Activities

315The latest information on progress in immunological research with particular relevance to allergy – that is what the audience can expect on September 15th, at 2 p.m. at the EAACI/DGAI Joint Symposium with the main theme ''Immune Regulation of Allergic Inflammation'' during the Allergy Congress 2004 in Aachen, Germany.

On Wednesday afternoon at 2 p.m., right at the beginning of the Allergy Congress 2004 in Aachen (Sept. 15th - Sept. 19th, 2004) there will be an international kick off symposium on the ''Immune Regulation of Allergic Inflammation". The event is a joint effort of the Immunology Sections of the German Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (DGAI) and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) with the aim to bring together members of both societies.

Eminent national and international scientists will present and discuss novel concepts and cutting edge data of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in allergic inflammation. Topics covered will be allergen carriers, pathogens, mucosal Langerhans cells, dendritic cells and regulatory T cells as modulators of allergic inflammation. The symposium is of interest for allergists of all disciplines, allergists in training, and graduate and postgraduate students involved in allergy research.

Invited speakers:

  • Cezmi Akdis, Davos, CH, (EAACI)
  • Thomas Bieber, Bonn (DGAI)
  • Thilo Jakob (DGAI/EAACI)
  • Joachim Saloga, Mainz (DGAI)
  • Frederica Sallusto, Bellinzona, CH, (EAACI)
  • Annika Scheynius, Lundt, Sweden, (EAACI)

On behalf of the DGAI and EAACI Immunology Sections I cordially invite you to participate in what promises to be a very exciting event right at the beginning of the Allergy Congress 2004 in Aachen.

Priv. Doz. Dr. med. Thilo Jakob
Secretary of the EAACI Immunology Section
ZAUM – Zentrum Allergie und Umwelt an der Klinik und Poliklinik für Dermatologie und Allergologie Biederstein Technische Universität München Biedersteinerstr.
29 80802 München;
Email: thilo.jakob@gsf.de

 

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Last updated 14 July 2009

Basic and Clinical Immunology Section - About Us

The immune system is able to distinguish self from non-self and dangerous from harmless. Allergic diseases represent the most notable failure in this system. The understanding, the research, diagnosis and management of allergies are therefore always related to immunology. Biologicals are becoming available that can selectively correct overshooting immune reactions. At the same time the costs of treatments increase and personalized approaches along with a sophisticated biomarker diagnosis are required to focus expenses to those patients who are most likely to benefit from it.

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