Patients
Everything you wanted to know
ABOUT ALLERGIES
" Have you got asthma?"

Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1. Pertussis and asthma
2. Anti-influenza vaccination of egg-allergic persons
3. Archive fungi (F) and occupational allergy
4. Exposition of asthmatic children to home fungal species
5. From rhinitis to asthma : the role of workplace humidity


1.  Pertussis and asthma

Theme: asthma, infection
Key words: asthma, pertussis, measles, anti-pertussis vaccination

The recent pertussis (P) outbreak in California, following that in Minnesota in 2004, despite vaccination, has induced C.R.Capilli of the Mayo Clinic (JACI 2012 129 4 957-963) to determine whether in a case-control population asthmatics (A) were more prone to contract P than non-asthmatics.

223 cases of P, identified in 2004 and 2005 by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) on nasopharyngeal sampling on As, were studied but only 164 subjects were enrolled with 328 controls. 50% were male, 80% white, with a median age 14. 62 (38%) of them were suffering from A before contracting P as opposed to 85 (26%) of the 328 controls (OR 1.73  P=.013).

To sum up the statistical data of the study, it appears that within a population like the USA’s with a high prevalence of A, the risk for an asthmatic person of catching P is 17%.

This means that asthmatics constitute a ‘target’ group for anti-P vaccination, with boosters and recall every 10 years at least, even in adults, and associated with anti-tetanus and anti-diphtheria vaccination, as is the case in France with the traditional DTCOQ.

Another point of view : P seems to be, like measles (M), a risk factor for child asthma, as shown by a study conducted in the Australian island of Tasmania by J.A.Burgess et al. (Chest  March 2012 early view on-line) among 7-year old children. The authors recorded over a 37-year period from a school medical data base, cases of children’s respiratory infections and their possible association with incidental, persistent or established asthma, all supported by a statistical logistic regression analysis. They were able to conclude that, while most children’s infections protected them against the occurrence of adult A, as well as against chicken pox or rubella, P and M were, on the contrary, significantly associated with adolescent incidence of A for the latter and pre-adolescent incidence of the former. Another reason, according to the authors, for recommending vaccination against P and M to reduce the incidence of asthma.

2.  Anti-influenza vaccination of egg- allergic patients

Theme: allergy, vaccination
Key words: anti-flu vaccine, egg, ovalbumin

The administration to an egg-allergic person of the anti-influenza vaccine (AIV) coming from an egg-grown virus and ovalbumin-laden virus is considered with some reluctance by doctors and families, above all when the child or the adult has a history of serious anaphylaxis (An) caused by this allergen. Yet AIV is unquestionably beneficial for public health, is generally harmless, and egg allergies are rare.

Two researchers from Philadelphia, USA (I.Feung et J.M.Spergel JACI 2012 129 4 1157-1159) undertook a retrospective review of 56 An-suffering children monitored between 2007 and 2009, who received 119 vaccinations using the Sanofi-Pasteur AIV (H1N1 excepted). 113 first underwent vaccine prick-tests (SPTs); children under 3 years of age received a 0.25-ml dose, those over that age 0.50ml in 2 or 3 doses.

Two children had a vaccine reaction : one of them, aged 2, had 2 reactions, he had had a positive SPT before the 1st vaccination but was not affected the following year, while the other, aged 18 months, suffering from asthma and for whom the SPT was not considered useful, had a reaction which was both moderate and reversible by simple anti-histamines.

On the whole, the authors concluded that AIV was harmless for the egg-allergic who have suffered a more or less recent An episode (on average 2 years before AIV). Besides, at the same time, 520 egg-allergy sufferers, without A, had only limited local reactions.

The authors refer to a few cases found in publications, from which it appears that AIV can be administered without serious problems to the egg-allergic, including subjects having had an An reaction.

The ovalbumin content (O) incriminated does not seem to play a negative role, as high O dosage vaccines did not provoke an increase in the risk of A. The AIV used in this study had a median ovalbumin concentration higher than those of other brands of vaccine.

As to the preliminary SPTs, these present no great interest, and neither does dose fractioning in 2 or 3 injections.

Allergists may therefore reassure their patients and families as to the harmlessness of AIV: post-vaccination monitoring of a few minutes or hours is nevertheless a necessity.

3.  Archives, fungi (F) and occupational allergy

Theme: allergens, environment
Key words: fungi, archives, Penicillium Chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Aspergillus versicolor

A French team of scientists from the Besancon University undertook an original survey on the possible contamination of the National Archives by fungi, trying to identify and quantify them through state-of-the-art techniques, to evaluate their concentration in the air and inside the documents, and finally to assess their effect on archivists’ and research assistants’ health, searching among other symptoms for allergic manifestations (S.Roussel et al Indoor Air 2012 22 2 early view). After an appeal on the National Archives website, the authors enrolled 10 volunteer centres for the survey.

2 techniques were used in the search for 50 or so F varieties: Air Impactor for the air, and Electrostatic Dust Collector for the archive zones.

2 methods were used and compared for F identification: culture-based analysis and quantitative PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). The criterion of 170 Colony Forming Units (CFU) per m3 was considered as potentially pathogen.

An inventory of symptoms suffered by subjects in contact with the archives was drawn up using a conventional self-report questionnaire distributed among the staff.

The results were as follows:

3 main F were isolated in terms of frequency and quantity : Penicillium Chrysogenum,  Cladosporium sphaerospermum and Aspergillus versicolor, with converging results for the two techniques (the PCRq also helped to isolate Stachybotris chartarum considered as a potent toxin generator). On the whole, archive contamination was found to be moderate. Median concentrations ranged between 30 and 465 CFU/m3, with 93% between low and medium : only 3% of the archives showed high concentrations.

As regards the question of health, subjects working in contaminated zones did not report more frequent allergy symptoms than their fellows. However, they did report headaches, eye and throat irritation, coughing and rhinorrhea. Only eye irritation was statistically significant.

These reassuring results corroborate observations made in rare similar studies conducted abroad, and which may concern a large number of subjects (over 1 million worldwide).

4.  Exposition of asthmatic children to home fungal species

Theme: asthma, environment
Key words: asthma, cladosporium, penicillium, aspergillus, basidiospores, epicoccum, pithomycea

Exposition to fungi (F) is known to play an important role in the development of asthma (A) and atopy, by increasing symptoms intensity and encouraging A exacerbation.

A group of American paediatricians from Kansas City focused on fungal species in the homes of asthmatic children, trying to identify them in a large number of Middle West homes, according to geographical location, seasons, and the presence of at least one asthmatic child (J.Meng et al Clin. Exp.Allergy 2012  21 March  accepted article).

Flats and houses enrolled in the study were part of a research project on home hygiene, which means that the more or less unsanitary ones were dropped and those with relatively comfortable conditions were given priority.

88 homes with one asthmatic child (aged 2-18) were then explored, particularly at the end of spring and in the autumn, when asthmatic and allergic subjects consult the doctor more frequently, and were compared to 85 control homes (with no asthmatic child), and during the influenza season depending on the frequency of paediatrician consultations.

The technique consisted in sampling fungal spores from the child’s bedroom and the living area, as well as in the outdoor environment, counting them per cubic metre of air, and cultivating them for CFU (Colony Forming Unit) identification and count.

Results reveal that 18 viable and potentially pathogenic species were isolated and 165 families out of 173 (97%) were host to at least one viable species.

Among them : Cladosporium in the first place, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Basidiospore, Epicoccum and  Pitomyces were identified more often and in higher concentration in homes with an asthmatic child than in control homes, even after adjustment for outdoor fungal spore concentration. The cultures confirm these observations after adjusting for seasonal factors. It is surprising to observe that Alternaria spores were not found more frequently in asthmatic homes than in controls. The responsibility of these fungi in the symptoms shown by the study asthmatics remains to be established through research already planned for the future (76% of them presented superior airway manifestations, 63% asthma-like symptoms, 43% skin signs). But we know that many of these F species are allergenic. This means that their detection followed by their elimination cannot but improve the treatment of asthma and benefit the asthmatic child.

5.  From rhinitis to asthma : the role of workplace humidity

Theme: asthma, environment
Key words: rhinitis, asthma, moulds, flooding, fungus index

It is well known that exposure to fungi in a damp environment increases the risk of allergic rhino-sinusitis, but there is little information on the progression of rhinitis towards asthma in an occupational context in a water-damaged building. American authors (J.H.Park et al Indoor air  avril 2012 early view) conducted 4 successive environmental and health surveys by questionnaires, in a 20-storey building in North East USA, built in 1985 and damaged by water flooding. Occupied in 1994, the building had been recognised as responsible for asthma cases and hypersensitivity pneumopathy among its occupants in the autumn of 2000, in relation with the inhalation of soil moulds. After several attempts to repair the damage in 2004, the authors monitored the evolution of 131 subjects between 2001 and 2007 initially suffering from rhinitis, compared to a control group of 361 other occupants.

Using logistic regression models they analysed the risk of asthma development among these two groups, adjusting for demographic data, possible smoking habits, duration of occupation of the premises and exposure to fungi, endotoxin and ergosterol expelled by fungal cell membranes.

The findings suggest that the rhino-sinusitis group were at least twice more likely to contract asthma than the control group (OR=2.2, CI95%=1.3-3.6). This risk was even higher when the rhino-sinusitis group was exposed to the building’s highest fungal concentration zones (OR=7.4, CI 2.8-19.9).

It is then possible to conclude with the authors that, in professional, water-damaged premises, the incidence of rhino-sinusitis among occupants may presage increased risk of asthma onset in the future.

An article in the same journal by a Japanese author (K.Abe  Indoor Air 2012 22 3 June 173-185 ) is therefore all the more interesting. It presents a fungus detector encapsulating as sensitizer either xerophilic fungus spores (Eurotium herbariorum or Aspergillus penicillioides) for use in not very damp premises, or hydrophilic fungus spores (Alternaria Alternata) in the case of extreme damp. This would mean that a fungus index could be set up, which would be of use to architects and owners of water-damaged business or residential premises, and in very different climates.


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Comments and questions welcome :

Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
*claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr **j.gayraud@orange.fr
Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1. Respiratory infection or allergy in infancy (or : Semiology rehabilitated by statistics)
2. Breastfeeding (BF) and allergy prevention – 1° : Epidemiologic data
3. Breastfeeding (BF) and allergy prevention – 2° :  Mechanisms
4. Nutrition and allergy : prebiotics and/or probiotics
5. Tuberculosis, BCG and allergy


1.    Respiratory infection or allergy in infancy (or : Semiology rehabilitated by statistics)

Theme: Asthma, infection
Key words: Asthma – Cough – Dyspnoea - Medoid

We know how difficult it is with coughing or breathless young children to differentiate between respiratory infection and allergy.

This is why a team of French researchers and paediatricians (Fanny Ranciere et al of the Health-Environment group : Isabelle. Momas : Ped.All. Immunol 2012 early view) undertook a very interesting and original study. They had previously monitored 2632 children of less than 1 year of age from a ‘Pollution and Asthma Risk’ cohort. Using the ‘medoid’ algorithm (Partitioning around medoids) which leads to a silhouette-graphed clustering, they had isolated 2 respiratory phenotypes : cough phenotype (CP) and dyspnoea phenotype (DP). They wanted to check whether these phenotypes were still valid at the age of 3, by following 2,084 children between 2003 and 2006 and clustering them according to symptoms, that is: sleep disturbing night cough, or dyspnoea. Purposefully, the term ‘wheezing’ was not used.

Parental questionnaires, family history of allergy, comorbidity, risk factors, domestic pollution, all the data analysed by multinomial logistic regression confirm the ‘medoid’ regrouping in 2 main profiles :
1)    CP : 14% of children, with dry night cough without dyspnoea, genetic factors of atopic predisposition, frequent allergic symptoms and presence of domestic allergens, as well as family problems such as parent separation or very ill mother.
2)    DP : 30% of subjects, with more severe symptoms, breathlessness disturbing sleep and daily life, day care centre attendance and infection risk factors, vulnerability to pathogens, domestic pollution (often chemical : tobacco, volatile organic components).

Thus, the 2 main symptoms of respiratory problems in 1- to 3-year old infants, i.e. cough and dyspnoea, when correctly analysed, help in discriminating between infection and allergy. Our Parisian colleagues should be thanked for having thus rehabilitated symptomatology, at a time of the apparent triumph of technology, and this, paradoxically, thanks to a cutting edge statistic tool.


2.    Breastfeeding (BF) and allergy prevention – 1° : Epidemiologic data

Theme: Atopy, atopy prevention
Key words: Breastfeeding – Asthma – Eczema - Infections

The role of breastfeeding in protection against allergic diseases is still arousing controversy : no less than 6 recent publications discuss it, mostly a confrontation between Europeans and Australians.

In ‘A tale of two cities’ (Brew et al: Ped.Allergy & lmmunol 2012 23 75-82), the authors confront the randomised data from 2 cohorts, one from Sidney (419 subjects) and the other from Stockholm (463), i.e. 882 subjects in whom the definitions for breastfeeding (at least for 3 months), asthma and allergy, were harmonized, and who were enrolled if they had at least one atopic or asthmatic parent and had a gestational age of more than 36 weeks.

After statistical analysis, it appeared that BF reduces the risk of asthma at the age of 4/5 and 8 years in children with family history of asthma. This effect is more marked in the Swedish than in the Australian cohort. It is also the opinion of some New Zealand authors (KM Silvers et al J. of Pediatrics 2012 January in press).

However a sceptical opinion can be found in a paper from Melbourne (Matheson et al : Clin & Exp. Allergy 2012 31 01 early view) which evokes an apparent protective effect of BF against asthma, but none against eczema or food allergy, nor any prevalence of sensitisation to airborne allergens. The authors believe that several confounders exist in the numerous epidemiologic studies, and wonder whether BF is not merely active in the prevention of infection, rather than actually reducing the risk of asthma. In the Australian cohort itself, BF may even act as risk factor for sensitisation to cow’s milk, eggs and peanuts at the age of 4/5 and, in both cohorts, at 8 years. Some authors had even suggested stopping it for under 1-year old children if some eczema or wheezing occurred, but the Melbourne authors found no evidence, in their joint study, that BF might have influenced any allergic manifestation.

On practical grounds, it is difficult for the clinician to adopt a dogmatic attitude in this matter, knowing however that in our Western countries it is recommended, depending on circumstances and environment, to breastfeed without exceeding 3 months.


3.    Breastfeeding (BF) and allergy prevention – 2° : Mechanisms

Theme: Atopy, atopy prevention
Key words: Maturation of innate immune responses – Cytokines – Polyunsaturated fatty acids

Epidemiologic data being not always convincing, BF supporters, including the WHO which recommends 3 to 6 months depending on the country, have tried to better define possible mechanisms.

Thus, a recent Anglo-Swiss study (C.M Dogaru et al. AJRCCM 2012 3 early view) of 1458 children, concludes that breast feeding has a favourable effect on the child’s future respiratory function by direct action on lung growth, particularly if the mother is asthmatic.

But a biology-focused Dutch group (M.G Belderbos et al : Ped.Allergy & Immunol 2012 2365-74), considering that the 1st month after birth is the most sensitive to environmental factors which can modulate the infant’s innate immune responses, undertook a prospective study of 291 healthy neonates (NN). They then statistically treated 6 exogenous factors (mode of delivery, BF, birth month, atopic siblings, passive smoking, pets), 7 types of total blood cells measured by flow cytometry (neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, dentritic myeloid cells, monocytes, natural killers, T lymphocytes) and 9 types of cytokines induced by Toll-like receivers (TLRs 1 to 9) revealed by the ELISA technique.

On the whole, it can be said that BF was found to be the determining exogenous factor for neonatal immunity, with 5 associated parameters : the production of TLR7-induced IL10 cytokine which is 4 times lower than for a formula-fed NN, whereas the TLR3-induced cytokine IL12p70 is 2 to 3 times higher, a sign of fast immunity maturation. On the other hand, the reduction of this latter cytokine is associated to the caesarean mode of delivery and could express an asthma risk for the infant. So, it is the 1st month immunity maturation which appears to provide the protective effect of BF.

Let us also quote the Barcelona survey (Eva.Morales et al Clin.Exp.Allergy 2012 30 January) conducted by parental questionnaires, with 580 children submitted to predominant BF during the first 4 to 6 months and whose long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) were dosed in colostrum. With high levels, a reduction in risk of wheezing and atopic eczema in 7- to 14-month old children is observed, as well as a lower risk of gastroenteritis in the first 6 months. This may account for the possible role played by nutritional factors in the preventive effect of BF, which some authors also attribute to the presence of TGFβ in mother’s milk.


4.    Nutrition and allergy : prebiotics and/or probiotics

Theme: allergy prevention
Key words: Intestinal micro flora – Infection – Antibiotics – Fatty acids – Prebiotics - Probiotics

The significant role of Intestinal Microflora (IMF) in the modulation of immunity is well known, with any change in its composition likely to trigger inflammation or allergy. Such is the case of antibiotics which, administered to children of less than 1 year, lead to allergic sensitisation. The high frequency of urban as opposed to rural allergies is also often explained by the presence in the former of a more limited microbe range. Food or ingredients are also likely to affect IMF. This is the case for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, but also for polyphenols and substances like prebiotics and probiotics, supposed to preserve or restore the microbial balance.

Prebiotics are carbohydrates, non-digestible by man, which, like inulin (produced by plants) or galacto-oligosaccharides, have a positive impact on IMF, by allowing the proliferation of bifido-bacterial type germs, the same germs that can be found in the breastfed baby. The International Association of Pre- and Probiotics has recorded more than 700 therapeutic trials with no formal conclusion, because the specific Prebiotic of a given microbial population is not known, neither the proper dosage.

As for Probiotics, which are living micro-organisms, these are under intensive research, both experimental and clinical, particularly in the food industry. One thinks particularly of yoghurts or other fermentation products, and of Lactobacillus (C.Wylliard  Nature 2011 479 S5-7). Many studies have been published of Lactobacillus casei administered to newborns in order to prevent eczema or asthma, or of Lactobacillus rhamnosus to infants or mothers before giving birth : more than 25 in 2008, randomised and often contradictory. In a recent Swiss paper (Wassenberg et al : Clin.Exp.Allergy 2011 4 565-573) the use of L.paracasei ST11 administered per os for one month in about 30 subjects, has shown some efficacy on the signs of pollen rhinitis. Other Japanese experiments were conducted successfully on mice with Clostridium (which has 46 different strains). But, on the whole and with the risk of playing the sorcerer’s apprentice, care must be taken in modifying or regulating IMF in order to combat or prevent allergic manifestations.


5.    Tuberculosis, BCG and allergy

Theme: allergy prevention
Key words: Tuberculosis – BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guerin) – Asthma - Eczema

An Anglo-Algerian epidemiologic retrospective randomised study, under the authority of the International Union against Tuberculosis and in the framework of the ISAAC study Phase 2 (C.Flohr et al Ped.Allergy & Immunol 2012 February early view), has attempted to discover whether previous tuberculosis (TB) or BCG vaccination in the first months of an infant could have a protective effect against the risk of allergy. 23,901 subjects, aged 8 to 12 and attending 20 different centres in developed and underdeveloped countries were the object of this study, conducted both by questionnaires and clinical examinations, concentrating on flexural eczema, and using skin prick tests. The odd ratios corresponding to a 95% confidence interval were calculated in the different centres according to the classical model. There were 245 TB cases and 66.3% of the children had received the BCG vaccine.

Findings showed that all allergic manifestations (asthma or wheezing, hay fever, signs of eczema) were significantly associated with TB the previous year. This was all the clearer for severe asthma and clinically established eczema. However, there is no association between TB and skin prick tests. As for BCG vaccination during the first year of life, it was in no way associated with subsequent allergic manifestation and does not seem to have a preventive effect against allergy.

All in all, this curious, positive association between TB and allergy does not, as the authors acknowledge, point to a causal relationship, but in view of the high number of subjects albeit in a cross-sectional study, it is possible to grant some value to this epidemiologic survey. It is above all interesting for those countries still struck by endemic tuberculosis.


-----
Comments and questions welcome :

Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
*claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr **j.gayraud@orange.fr


Centre for Immune Regulation (CIR) is a research centre established as a Centre of Excellence by the Research Council of Norway at the University of Oslo and the Oslo University Hospital. CIR is also a FOCIS (Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies) Center of Excellence. Our scientific goal is to identify and investigate mechanisms of immune dysregulation that contribute to allergic and autoimmune disease to advance the development of therapeutics. CIR consists of five research groups and approximately 100 people. The research environment is very dynamic and there is extensive interaction between the groups. CIR has an educational program which includes seminar series and invited internationally renowned guest professors. For more information, see http://www.med.uio.no/cir/english/

For a term of four years, the duties of editor include:

• The Editor supervises all editorial content of the Journal. S/he serves to preserve the editorial integrity and substance of Clinical and Translational Allergy in cooperation with the Editorial Board and the Managing Editor.
• Appointing editorial board members.
• Soliciting for manuscripts and overseeing the review process.
• Establishing editorial guidelines for journal contributions.
• Reviewing article proofs.
• Working with Publisher to ensure timely publication of each manuscript
• Managing the electronic manuscript submission and review process.
• Promoting communication among the many individuals involved in the publication of the Journal.
• Proposing innovations in content, emphasis, and form.
The Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI), Federal Institute for Vaccines and Biomedicines, is a world-renowned scientific institute devoted to
improving public health by ensuring the safety and efficacy of vaccines and biomedicines both in Germany and throughout the world.  PEI carries out its mission through scientific research and medicinal product regulation. Internationally competitive research is carried out in the fields of virology, microbiology, allergology, immunology, hematology and cell and gene therapy.

The following position is to be filled in the section "Clinical Allergology" within the division Allergology as soon as possible:

Medical Assessor (MD)
Closing date: 23 December 2011

The "Clinical Allergology" section is responsible for the assessment of pre-clinical and clinical data on test and therapy allergens resulting from
non-clinical studies and clinical trials. This also includes evaluation of national and European development programs.

Key responsibilities
Assessing pre-clinical and clinical data in clinical trial applications and in national and European marketing authorization applications for test or
therapeutic allergens in interdisciplinary project teams
Involvement in scientific and regulatory advice to manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies and sponsors of clinical trials on planning and
implementation of clinical development programs and clinical trials
Active participation in European regulatory procedures

Essential criteria for applying
Medically qualified and registered to practice within the European Community with the General Medical Council
With (or completing study towards) a relevant higher medical or scientific qualification
Excellent social, organisational and interpersonal skills and outstanding ability to work under pressure
Ability and readiness to work and communicate in interdisciplinary teams
IT skills appropriate for an information-based organisation and a fast-paced working environment (MS office applications, databases ...)
Good spoken and written communication skills in English (negotiation level)

The appointment will initially be for a limited period of five years.

The standard working week is currently 39 hours for employees in the public service of the Federal Republic of Germany; part-time employment
is also possible. The annual salary between € 45.000,00 and € 55.000,00 will be in accordance with German TVoD regulations (collective
bargaining agreement for employees in public service). If the provisions of German civil service code are fulfilled staff members may be granted
civil servant status.

Non-residents will be given assistance in finding accommodation. Relocation expenses and/or a special allowance for living away from your
present place of residence will be paid in compliance with the legal regulations. Disabled applicants shall be given preference if their skills and
qualifications are equivalent to those of non-disabled candidates. The Paul-Ehrlich-Institut is an equal opportunities employer and therefore
welcomes applications especially from women.

Please send your full application to:
Personnel Unit of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut
Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse 51-59, 63225 Langen, Germany
www.pei.de

For further information contact:
E-Mail bewerbungen@pei.de
Phone +49 6103 77 1100
Please quote job reference 31/2011.


The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is proud to have started its first open access journal in 2011 (Clinical & Translational Allergy: www.ctajournal.com). CTA is a peer reviewed scientific online-only journal publishing original work and reviews in any field of allergy.  After a successful startup stage, the Academy is now recruiting a new long-term Editor of the journal, with a four year term.  The journal has been online since February 2011, but was launched in June 2011. CTA is expected to be tracked by PubMed by the end of 2011, which is exceptionally quick for a newly launched scientific journal.

Description of Duties

The duties as editor of Clinical & Translational Allergy are:
The Editor supervises all editorial content of the Journal. S/he serves to preserve the editorial integrity and substance of Clinical & Translational Allergy in cooperation with the Editorial Board and the Managing Editor.
Appointing editorial board members.
Soliciting for manuscripts and overseeing the review process.
Establishing editorial guidelines for journal contributions.
Reviewing article proofs.
Working with Publisher to ensure timely publication of each manuscript
Managing the electronic manuscript submission and review process.
Promoting communication among the many individuals involved in the publication of the Journal.
Proposing innovations in content, emphasis, and form.
A limited honorarium is awarded an efficient editor at the end of each year, for the appreciation of the extra efforts made to maintain high quality and a rapid editorial process.

The Editor selection committee welcomes inquiries and applications for the position of Editor. Applicants should forward a letter of application and curriculum vitae by December 1st, 2011 to:
Michael Walker
EAACI Executive Director

Letters of application should include the following information:
1. A statement of interest in the position and unique contributions that could be made to the journal
2. Professional affiliations and CV including experience as an editor, editorial boards and reviewer
3. Publication list
4. Previous engagements with EAACI
EAACI Summit on Asthma Severity and Exacerbations
10 – 11 November 2011
Athens, Greece

The EAACI Asthma Section has identified that the critically important missing link in our asthma portfolio is in the area of severe asthma and asthma exacerbations. We will address this by developing an EAACI Statement on Asthma Exacerbations and Severity and by organising a summit linking together the endotype concept with severity and exacerbations, and will prepare and publish the report. Furthermore, it would be the perfect extension of the PRACTALL initiative on asthma endotypes.

The “EAACI Summit on Asthma Severity and Exacerbations” will take place 10 – 11 November 2011 in Athens, Greece (in the Grand Resort Lagonissi hotel - www.grandresort.gr). It will include 3 sessions on 4 main topics: asthma exacerbations; severe asthma; and early life predictors, genetics, epigenetics and management of severe asthma and asthma exacerbations. More than 20 invited experts will give their views on contentious topics. A number of key opinion leaders have confirmed their participation (please see the programme of the meeting).

25 Junior members will be invited to attend this summit and they will be awarded with travel grants to cover their expenses. The only criteria for the travel grant award will be the quality of the abstract presented (Abstract topics: severity, exacerbations, endotypes/phenotypes). Junior members will attend the round table discussions to witness the process of developing a consensus statement.



Abstract submission
will be open 1 - 30 September 2011.
Please click here to download abstract submission form.

This is the right time to mark the date in your calendar and work towards writing an abstract.

Please note that only invited speakers and 25 Asthma Section Junior members selected after abstract submission will attend this summit. There is no registration for this event – only invited participants.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts!
Yours sincerely,


Adnan Custovic                                                                        Cezmi Akdis
Organiser                                                                                 EAACI President
EAACI Asthma Section Chairperson
European Academy of Allergy Clinical Immunology is seeking new Executive Director

The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, EAACI, is a non-profit association with more than 6’000 members with the aim :

to promote basic and clinical research in the field
collecting, assessing and disseminating scientific  information
functioning as a scientific reference body for other scientific, health
and political organizations
encouraging and providing training and continuous education
promoting good patient care in this important area of medicine.

Role of the Executive Director: Responsible for management and development of the EAACI Headquarters; responsible for the everyday business, and to provide administrative support for the EAACI Board of Officers and Executive Committee.

Desired Qualifications: University level education or equivalent professional degree, preferably in public health and administration. 10 years of experience in administration and management of alliances and/or associations. 

For further details, you may download the attachment (click here).
Dear members,

The Section and Interest Group elections are now open and will close on 1 April at midnight CET.  Click here to vote!c

For each Section or Interest Group, 7 positions are open for election and the procedure is the following:

1.    If the Chairperson and Secretary are eligible according to the EAACI bylaws (link) and willing to serve a second term, their slots are open for election without competition

2.    Current regular Board members who are eligible according to the EAACI bylaws (link) and willing to continue to serve compete for election by the constituency for 3 slots by the single transferable vote system (STV).

3.    Members nominated as candidates to become new Board members compete for election by the constituency for 2 slots, by simple majority vote, or STV, depending on the number or applications.

4.    In case the Chairperson, the Secretary or several current Board members are not eligible or willing to stand for re-election, their slots are open to competition for new members, as described above under paragraph 3.

5.    The Chairpersons and Secretaries of the Sections and Interest Groups will be elected by their respective Boards.

We will inform you in due time of the outcome of the elections.

We thank you in advance for your active participation in these elections.

With best regards

Nikos Papadopoulos
EAACI Secretary General



Juniors

The JMA Working Group (WG) is composed by young members (age<35 y.o.) representing Sections and Interest Groups, one Webmaster and one Chairperson.

This year part of the JMA working group will be renewed: Asthma, ENT and Pediatric sections' representative persons, and all Interest Groups' representative persons will be newly elected.

Moreover, the new Chairperson will be elected among previous working group members who applied for election.

Please give your preference for all JMA WG positions, choosing one of the candidates for each position.
Some positions have only one candidate; please give your support to the candidate voting for him/her even if he/she is the only candidate for that position: this will be interpreted as your support to him/her"

Best Regards,
The JMA Working Group










In 1911, Leonard Noon, followed closely by John Freeman, published the first reports on allergen immunotherapy in The Lancet. One century later, EAACI is celebrating this pioneering work in 2011.

EAACI is developing different initiatives, in order to highlight the importance of this initial work, which has rendered in the actual state of the art in allergen immunotherapy. EAACI’s key goal regarding the 100 year celebration in the immunotherapy field in 2011 is to achieve greater attention to immunotherapy, to reach out to more doctors and to get more patients treated appropriately.

One of the highlights of this campaign is to dedicate an EAACI Noon Award to a scientist/doctor/researcher who has made an outstanding contribution in the “Immunotherapy” field. This Award will be presented during the EAACI Congress 2011 in Istanbul.

If you are an EAACI Member and you would like to participate in nominating one candidate of choice, please send us your name, name of the person you care to nominate and the reason why you believe this candidate should receive the EAACI Noon Award (1 sentence) by latest Sunday, 20 February 2011 to cristina.achiaga@eaaci.net.
The international PhD and MD/PhD Program Inflammation and Immunity (IAI) announces new openings for graduate student positions awarded to the best candidates on a competitive basis.

Requirements:
•    Highly qualified applicants from all over the world are invited to apply provided that they are not older than 28 years. Age limit extensions are applicable for special private circumstances; please contact the coordinator for details.
•    All applicants should be fluent in written and spoken English (TOEFL certificate or others)
•    All applicants must hold a university degree latest by October 2010 and should fulfill the official admission criteria for PhD students at the MUW (see §2 of the Curriculum of the PhD-Studies). The university degree should qualify for the start of a PhD thesis in their home country and ideally should be equivalent to a European university diploma.
•    All applicants should have excellent academic track records and demonstrate strong enthusiasm and talent for research.

Application:
By September 15, 2010 (deadline) applicants should mail or email the completed application forms containing the following information to the IAI PhD Program office:

•    a detailed CV demonstrating competence and motivation for science
•    all undergraduate level certificates including university grades. Foreign documents must be sent as certified English translations
•    a summary of technical and scientific experiences
•    the synopsis of the diploma thesis
•    a list of publications and/or presentations at meetings
•    names and address of 2-3 referees who will separately have to send letters of recommendation and a completed questionnaire to the IAI PhD Program office (see details below)
•    indication of at least 2-3 preferred laboratories / projects within the IAI program (click here for details) and explanation for these choices. This statement of preference will be considered by the IAI faculty but is not regarded as a strict commitment by either side.

Only complete applications can be considered for the selection procedure.
Reapplications will not be considered.

Application forms can be downloaded directly from this website or are available from the IAI PhD Program office at:
IAI PhD Program
att Ms. Marianne Wang

Institute for Cancer Research
Medical University of Vienna
Borschkegasse 8a
A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Tel: +43-1-4277-65131
phd-iai@meduniwien.ac.at

Deadline:
Deadline for receipt of completed application and reference letters is September 15, 2010

Letter of recommendation:
Letters of recommendation are requested from at least two scientists who are familiar with the academic work of the candidate and who can judge their potential as a PhD student. Applicants must forward the enclosed questionnaire letter to the referees and ask them to send their letters of recommendation directly to the IAI PhD Program office at the above address in a closed envelope or by email.
Please note that we will be unable to process your application without letters of recommendation. These letters are therefore an essential part of the application, and it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the referees write to us latest by September 15, 2010.

Selection procedure and admission:
Complete applications will be reviewed and ranked by a selection committee consisting of the IAI faculty. The short-listed candidates will receive invitations to visit our laboratories at the Medical University of Vienna for a 2-3 day period for interviews and information exchange. These interviews will take place in October 2010. Travel expenses will be reimbursed, and free accommodation will be provided. Offers of admission will be made to the successful candidates at the end of the interview period.

Benefits for students of the IAI PhD program:
Graduate students admitted to the IAI PhD program will have a regular employment with full social security coverage at the Medical University of Vienna and receive funding for at least 3 years according to the salary scheme of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF). Students will be assigned to a PhD thesis committee composed of the supervisor, one internal and one external advisor. Thesis research will be accompanied by an educational training program in the field of inflammation and immunity.
Additionally the PhD program will provide support for:

•    Travel expenses
•    Research stays abroad in collaborating international institutions / universities
•    Organization of special scientific workshops
•    Language courses
•    Special lectures on career awareness and soft skill trainings
•    Active involvement in teaching activities

Gender mainstreaming:
The IAI faculty aims at increasing the percentage of women in science. Qualified female students are therefore strongly encouraged to apply.


Download:
MUW Curriculum PhD Studies


EAACI JMA poster session winners:
  
Allergic immune response, Occupational and Hymenoptera allergy
Luliana Badiu

 

Asthma:  Epidemiology and Management
Smitha Nair
  
Asthma:  mechanisms
Melanie Albrecht
  
Clinical immunology and Urticaria/Angioedema
Zita Travnickova
  
Drug allergy:  Clinical aspects
Andreia Vasconcelos Pinela
  
Environment, allergens and allergy
Helen Brough
  
Food allergy & Laboratory tests for allergy
Vito Sabato
  
Food allergy:  Epidemiology and Mechanisms
Thomas Aldick
  
Immunity and sinonasal diseases
Stefanie Eyerich
  
Immunotherapies
Brinda Subbarayal
  
Miscellaneous
Paraskevi Maggina
  
Molecular allergology
Alina Neunkirchner
  
Peadiatrics
Kim van de Kant
  
Skin allergic diseases, Allergy prevention and Eosinophil/Mast cell disorders
Subhashree Mahapatra
  
  
EAACI JMA case report session winners:
  
Andreia Vasconcelos Pinela
  
David Spoerl
  
Diana Pérez
33th EAACI Congress
Copenhagen, Denmark

 

{tab=Sep 2008}

September 2008
Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

  • Puberty and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in young asthmatic patient
  • Maternal Food during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Asthma
  • Wheeze , Atopy and Bronchial Pathology
  • Hypersensitivity to Chemotherapy: desensitisation technique
  • Arginine Metabolism and Asthma

Puberty and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in the young asthmatic patient
Although Asthma affects mainly males in early childhood, it is a disease primarily of girls in adolescence. Since bronchial hyper reactivity is an important component of Asthma throughout life, it is interesting to know how such reactivity evolves, particularly spanning puberty. A group of American physicians, within the framework of multicentre treatment programme for childhood asthma, attempted to analyse this factor in a longitudinal epidemiological study that included 1041 , 5-12 year old children with moderate asthma and followed for a period of 8.6 +/- 1.8 years. (K.G Tantisira et al. Airway Responsiveness in Mild to moderate Childhood asthma. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2008; 178: 325-331).

The authors performed methacholine provocation tests in these patients, at the beginning of study, and yearly at 1 and up to 8 years, and evaluated PC 20 (the lowest dose inducing a 20% decrease in FEV1). 7.748 methacholine tests were carried out in order to determine the influence of sex and age on bronchial reactivity. The results were analysed using multiple linear regression tests with adjustment for confounding variables.

The principal conclusions of this important study were :
1) PC20 increases with age (thus, bronchial reactivity decreases) more clearly in boys older than 11 years than in girls (p¡Ü 0.001)
2) Reactivity significantly increases in girls after puberty, independently of any potential confounding factors

Overall, bronchial reactivity was more severe in girls than in boys and persists after puberty . The authors suggest the role of hormonal factors (but without any hormonal study in support of their hypothesis).

This interesting work is also a long term prospective study covering puberty and whose conclusions may be useful for considering changes in asthma therapy and prevention in the adolescent.

Maternal Food diet during Pregnancy and Risk of childhood Asthma
It is known that maternal food consumption during pregnancy may affect the development of airways in the child and promote a Th2-type response to allergens during foetal life, with the risk of subsequent development of allergies or asthma during childhood.

A group of Dutch researchers has therefore carried out a longitudinal, questionnaire-based study assessing the influence of the consumption of certain foodstuffs during pregnancy on the eventual development of asthma in children followed up between 1 and 8 years of age (M. Willers et al. Maternal food consumption during pregnancy and the longitudinal development of childhood asthma. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2008; 178 : 124-131). 4146 pregnant women (1327 atopic and 2819 non atopic) were submitted to a questionnaire about the frequency of their consumption of 1 to 8 principal food categories, particularly during the last month of pregnancy : fruits, vegetables fish, eggs, milk, nuts (including peanut), and peanut butter (commonly used in northern countries and which was included within the nuts group, in this study).

2832 children were followed up and the obtained data were complete.
The authors did not find any significant association between maternal food consumption and asthma in children. Nevertheless, consumption of fresh fruits seemed to protect children against the risks of asthma or allergies (borderline statistical significance), whereas daily ingestion of nuts increased the risk of asthma in comparison with an intermittent consumption.

The limitations of this study derive from the difficulties in the statistical interpretation of the data as well as from the various confounding factors such as life style, socio-professional class and region or country concerned. Thus, the study does not allow professionals to advise a precise food diet for the pregnant woman, apart from a diversified diet avoiding regular ingestion of a single food, particularly nuts.

Wheezing, Atopy and Bronchial Pathology
Various studies have shown that, in the atopic child, wheezing tends to persist into the adulthood, occasionally becoming asthma, whereas they generally regress during adolescence in non-atopic children.

In order to assess whether bronchial histology is different in these 2 types of individuals, the Italian authors from the Universities of Padua and Modena performed bronchial biopsies in 38 wheezing children, who had repetitive multitrigger episodes of cough, dyspnoea and wheezing, apart cold periods (18 were non atopic and aged between de 2 and 10 years, 20 were atopic and aged between 2 and 15 years, and 17 were healthy controls between 2 and 14 years old. (G.Turato et al. Non atopic children with multi-trigger wheezing have airway pathology comparable to atopic asthma. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2008 ; 178 : 476-482).

All pathological and histochemical criteria were similar in the 2 groups of children. When compared to healthy controls, patients had a statistically significant thickening of the basal membrane (p=0.0001), with an increased loss of the epithelium (p= 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). In the mucosa, there was also an increase of respectively angiogenesis, number of eosinophils, and expression of IL-4, all criteria statistically significant (only borderline significant for IL-5).
As in adults, a tendency towards the presence of more severe symptoms with a clearer decrease in FEV1 was observed in non atopic patients.

Thus, histological and histochemical changes were identical in wheezing children responsive to bronchodilators, and whose symptoms persisted, whether the child was atopic or not. So, when suggestive symptoms such multitrigger wheezing occur in non atopic children, the pathology is typical of asthma.

Hypersensitivity to Chemotherapy : desensitisation technique
In the presence of a hypersensitivity reaction to a chemotherapy drug, the doctor
faces a cruel dilemma : either to risk an anaphylactic reaction upon reintroduction of the product or to stop the treatment and use a less efficacious or ill tolerated drug.

A Boston university team (M.C. Castells et al. Hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapy. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2008 ; 122 : 574-580 ) developed a rapid and standardised desensitisation protocol in order to obtain at least temporary tolerance to 7 different drugs : carboplatin, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, paclixatel, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin and, which is original in this work, a monoclonal antibody: rituximab.

98 patients were thus treated using a rapid 12-step protocol, administered intravenously or peritoneally. The first injections were performed at an Intensive Care Unit and subsequent injections were given in an outpatient setting.
Safety and efficacy of the protocol were proven in all the cases.

In fact, out of 413 desensitisations performed, 94% were concluded without any side-effects or only with minimal reactions. There were no anaphylactic reactions or deaths and all the patients received the full target dose.
Reactions were more commonly reported during the final steps of the procedure.
Intravenous and peritoneal routes were equally effective.

Such a type of protocol had already been utilised for desensitisation to platin in some isolated cases as we had mentioned in our December 2004 Allergy Newsletter (www.egora.fr).

The interest of this study lies in the extension of this technique to a large number of patients and its application to several chemotherapy drugs including a monoclonal antibody.

Arginine metabolism and Asthma
As unique donor of a N ion in the synthesis of Nitric Oxyde (NO) as well as key participant in the urea cycle, Arginin (Arg) and its metabolites namely ornithin and citrullin are linked to cell respiration and inflammation.
Physicians involved in the Severe Asthma research programme of the NHLBI, USA, put forward the hypothesis that bioavailability of Arg might be associated to the inflammation and bronchial problems in asthma and also account for its severity.
Such bioavailability was therefore assessed by plasma Arg. dosage, relative to its metabolites and to NO synthase inhibitors and by the arginase activity in serum. This was performed in 258 patients : 232 asthmatic patients out of which 84 were severe and 148 who were moderate as well as 26 controls Simultaneously, were also studied lung function and inflammation parameters, including the fraction of expired NO (FE NO), but also IgE, skin prick tests to allergens, blood eosinophilia, and eventually broncho-alveolar lavage fluid. (A. Lara. Alterations of the Arginine metabolome in Asthma Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2008; 178 : 673-681).

Results were the following
Asthmatic patients had higher levels of Arg. bioavailability than healthy controls, but also an increased catabolism of Arg as shown by serum arginase activity and elevated levels of FE NO.

Inflammation parameters were related to bronchial obstruction, in a paradoxical way, in patients with moderate asthma but not in severe cases. By contrast, Arg bioavailability was related to bronchial obstruction in severe asthma, but not in moderate cases. This means that bioavailability of Arg is not a surrogate measure for inflammation (in contrast with FE NO) but it is strongly associated ,like arginase activity, with airflow abnormalities in severe asthma, and particularly with bronchial remodelling.

These results are all the more important that Arginase inhibitors are studied as protection against allergen induced bronchospasm in a experimental model of asthma in the guinea pig (H. Maarsing. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2008 ; 178 565-573) thereby opening new therapeutic avenues.

Source: CEFCAP

You may send your comments to these short news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

{tab=Oct 2008}

October 2008
Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

  • «Inflammometry» in the treatment of Asthma
  • Determining factors for pet ownership: their relationship with Asthma & Allergy
  • Allergists face to Primary Immune Deficiencies (PID)
  • Genetic approach to Primary Immune Deficiencies
  • Genetics, Asthma, and Passive Smoking

« Inflammometry » in the treatment of Asthma
Bronchial inflammation is, with more or less variable obstruction, one of the components of asthma. Its assessment entitled « Inflammometry » (I.D. Pavord et al. Lancet 2008; 372: 1017-1018) cannot be performed either clinically, apart from exacerbation periods, or by spirometry even when associated with multiple daily peak flow recordings. Thus, these authors tried to found eosinophils in spontaneous or induced sputum as well as to measure the fraction of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air (FE NO) which is currently facilitated by practical and cheap monitoring devices. Association of these 2 techniques allow ascertaining indication for therapy as well as appreciating the efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatment with corticoïds. Indeed, the authors acknowledge that induced sputum is a demanding technique and cannot always be easily performed in asthmatic patients whose expectoration is often scarce.
In addition, even if FE NO concentration (between 25 and 50 ppm) correlates well with the presence of eosinophils and justifies the indication for and maintenance of corticotherapy, its validity is far from being unanimous. Thus, S.J. Szefler et al (Management of Asthma based on exhaled nitric oxide in addition to guideline-based treatment for inner city adolescents and young adults : a randomised controlled trial : Lancet 2008; 372: 1065-1072)think it does not bring any benefit and rather may induce an unwarranted increase of inhaled corticosteroid doses.
Similarly, de De Jongste et al (Daily telemonitoring of exhaled NO and symptoms in the treatment of childhood asthma. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 17 October 2008) note that a sophisticated equipment do not have any advantage over the standard technique.

In conclusion in the treatment and monitoring of asthma, the assessment of airway inflammation is an interesting complement to clinical aspects and lung function testing. However, the former cannot replace the latter and vice-versa.

Determining factors for pet ownership : their relationship with Asthma and Allergy
It is known that the presence of a pet (cats and dogs, in particular) is regarded by some authors as a risk factor for asthma and allergy, whereas others assign them a protective role. Such divergence of opinion might be due to a wrong interpretation in epidemiologic studies which do not take into account all confounding factors.

This highlights the interest in this meta-analysis of factors determining ownership of a cat or a dog. This study involved the monitoring of 12 European cohorts from 7 different countries, each one including between 485 and 4089 allergic (rhinitis, eczema) or asthmatic children, in a total of 25056 families.
Questionnaires used included questions on previous history of allergies and Asthma in the children and their parents, parental educational level, the number of children in the family, access to residence (ground floor) the presence of one or many pets (E. Eller et al. Meta-analysis of determinants for pet ownership in 12 European birth cohorts on asthma and allergies: A GA²LEN initiative. Allergy 2008; 63: 1491-1498).

In this study, 14.9% of the families had at least one cat, and 12% at least one dog. A family history of allergy significantly decreased the opportunity of owning a cat (OR 0.91; CI 95% 0.85-0.99) or a dog (OR 0.90 ; 0.86-0.94).
A high level of parental education also decreased such opportunity, which was more evident for cats than for dogs.
Apart from this, the older the children are, the lower the chances are for a family to own a cat. That was not seen in the case of dogs.
Finally, the convenience of ground access is a factor which favours owning a pet, whereas the number of children is not associated with its presence.

Thus, socio-demographic factors such as family history of allergy, a high parental educational level, home ground access, must be taken into consideration in all european statistical study that may wish to analyse the influence of pets on allergy or asthma in children.

Allergists face to Primary Immune Deficiencies (PID)
PID include approximately150 identified diseases, 120 of which are due to genetic defects. They are relatively rare, and their diagnosis depends upon the sagacity of the doctor and the laboratory support in the area or region concerned.
This highlights the interest of the general review dedicated to « Common variable immunodeficiency » by English-speaking authors (M. A. Park et al. Lancet 2008: 372 ; 489-502) corresponding to Hypo- or Agammaglobulinemia or Humoral PID of the French litterature. It represents 65% of PID and is characterised by repetitive bouts of sinus and pulmonary infections, affecting the young adult, male or female, and in whom one detects a clear decrease of serum levels of at least two immunoglobulins: IgA , IgG or IgM.
The allergist or pulmonologist may therefore have to face these patients with upper (sinusitis) or lower (pneumonia) airway infections which mimic asthma or chronic bronchitis, and which are due to Hemophilus influenzae or Mycoplasma and may justify antibiotics in primary care .
However, the association with other symptoms may draws attention :
Auto-immune manifestations : thrombocytopenic purpura or haemolytic anemia, Pulmonary complications such as bronchectasis or granulomatosis resembling sarcoidosis, or Gastro-intestinal problems similar to Crohn’s disease or coeliac disease, or Non-hodgkin Lymphoma.

The diagnosis comprises 3 steps :
1st step : F.B.C. (Full blood count) and determination of serum Immunoglobulins, as well as search for proteins in the urine (to exclude a nephrotic syndrome)
2nd step : Determination of serum levels of IgG sub-classes (IgG1 to IgG 4), anti-diphteria and anti-tetanus antibodies and haemagglutinins as well as an antibody response to Streptococcus Pneumoniae type polysaccharide vaccination.
In fact, the absence of antibodies requires replacement treatment with intravenous or sub-cutaneous Immunoglobulins, as suggested by M.L. Moore and J.M. Quinn (Annals of Allergy 2008; 101: 114-121).
It is also relevant at this stage to quantify, by flow cytometry, B and T Lymphocytes as well as Natural Killer cells, whereas the study of B sub-populations will be part of the 3rd step.
3rd step : essentially genetic studies (which will be discussed next)

Genetic approach to Primary Immune Deficiencies
In the case of PID described beforehand, genetic studies are rarely indicated since corresponding mutations are rare and not always clinically relevant. In 15% of the cases, particularly when Agammaglobulinemia is associated with an absence or a very low percentage of B Lymphocytes, involved genes have been described : ICOS (Inducible T cell Costimulator) in 9 patients, TNF superfamily : 13 B in 17 patients and 13 C in one patient, and CD19 in 4 patients. As for the other PID, mainly seen in infants and children, their prognosis is often severe, and they present with different clinical phenotypes.
When a phagocytic deficit or a chronic septic granulomatosis are suspected, one should do a neutrophil count, study their chemotactic response and their phagocytic capacity using a Nitro-Blue Tetrazolium or a Dihydro-Rhodamine stain and flow cytometry for detection of expression of CD11/CD18 before studying the gene.
When one suspects that cell Immunity is affected, analysis should initially include a flow cytometry study of the percentage of T lymphocytes, and Natural Killer cell subpopulations as well as an in vivo and in vitro analysis of T cell function.

Several detailed tables of the most frequent PID and implicated genes are published in the paper by H.K. Lehman et al (The use of commercially available genetic tests in immunodeficiency disorders. Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008; 212-218) and include the addresses of Laboratories specializing in the study of these diseases in the US.

Such genetic studies must be performed after having obtained a written informed consent from the patients and/or their families. They are carried out in the blood or in oral scrapings, particularly in severely leucopenic patients (in whom the amount of necessary DNA may be insufficient in the blood) or in the case where a bone marrow transfer must be performed (which may contain donor blood cells).

In France, it is mainly at Hôpital Necker, in Paris, that after the internationally acknowledged contribution by C. Nezelof, the remarkable work by Alain Fischer on SCID (Severe Combined Immune Deficiencies, which are most often X-linked and potentially lethal) has applied gene therapy which has proven to be very efficacious, thanks to the introduction of genes using retroviral vectors(Thérapie génique des Déficits immunitaires Sévères. A. Fischer et al. Bull.Acad. Nat. Med. 2005; 189: 779-788)

Genetics , Asthma, and Passive Smoking
In a study involving the human genome, a group of French researchers had shown the association between certain genetic variations in chromosome 17q21 and an increased risk of Asthma. In order to elucidate this association, a larger study was performed involving various clinical phenotypes of the disease (Effect of 17q21 variants and smoking exposure in early onset asthma. E. Bouzigon et al. N. Eng. J. Med. 2008 359 19 November 6 1985-1994 ).

The methodology involved testing for 36 SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) in the 17q21 region in 1511 asthmatic patients from 372 families. The age at onset of asthma and early passive exposure to tobacco smoke (from parents) were also taken into consideration.

11 SNP were significantly associated with Asthma, of which 3 were very strongly and 4 were strongly associated with an early-onset asthma (4 years old or younger). By contrast, no association was observed with late-onset asthma.

Furthermore, a very strong association was seen between 6 SNP and early-onset asthma when the children had been early exposed, to passive smoking. A specific genetic variant (re8069176) was associated with a 3-fold higher risk of asthma than other genotypes.

Therefore this excellent study shows the joint effect of genetic (chromosome 17q21, in this case) and environmental factors (here tobacco-smoke) upon the pathophysiology of asthma, in the context of passive smoking by the young child.

Source: CEFCAP

You may send comments on these brief news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

{tab=Nov 2008}

November 2008

Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

  • Therapeutic innovation in Asthma
  • The beekeeper : a model of immunologic tolerance
  • Is anti-fungal treatment useful in Severe Asthma with sensitisation to Fungi ?
  • Mediterranean diet: Protective role for Wheezing in pre-school children ?

Therapeutic innovations in Asthma

1) Improvement of usual treatments
This excellent and comprehensive review (I. M. Adcock et al. New targets for drug development in Asthma. Lancet 2008; 372: 1073-1087) starts by highlighting that 90% of Asthma cases respond favourably to conventional therapy based upon inhaled corticosteroids and â2-agonists. Thus, the remainder consists of 5 to 10% of cases of severe Asthma, which are responsible for 50% of the costs associated with the disease and for which novel targets and new therapeutic approaches have to be developed. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the therapeutic arsenal, with the anti-IgE Omalizumab which is successfully used in the severe allergic forms of asthma. However, research must understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these severe forms of Asthma, thereby suggesting the possibility of several different phenotypes of the disease.

The authors analyse the development of the ultra long acting â2-agonist, which may act rapidly, their effects lasting longer than 24h (carmoterol, indacaterol) and may be only taken once-a-day. Another approach is the attempt to avoid the side- effects of corticosteroids via the use of a pro-drug.
These ways include:
a) using the pro-drug which is only activated in the airways (ciclesonide)
b) dissociating corticosteroids from their different effects by modifying the activation of their receptor (transrepression)
c) by addition of a biochemical NO-donor group , which has been experimentally efficient
d) through utilisation of novel inhalers which deliver mono-dispersed particles with sparing effect, and equivalent efficacy.

One may also mention the anti-lipid mediator drugs such as anti-leucotrienes (Montelukast, Zileuton), not very effective but may eventually be tested in « neutrophilic » cases of Asthma since they inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. Likewise,anti-prostaglandin PGD2 or anti-PAF drugs, are still at an experimental stage or at phase II of clinical trials. In any case, it is known that the inhibitory action upon a single mediator or receptor has little chances of being effective.

2) Therapeutic innovation in Asthma
The novel targets :
These are chemokines and their receptors, Th2-derived cytokines, transcription factors, enzymes and several immune cells. Chemokines are responsible for the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airways. There are 4 families classified according to their cysteine radicals. Several receptors exist and one of them, CCR3 which recruits eosinophils is a preferential target .Their levels are increased in Asthma and inhibitory anti-sense oligonucleotides have already shown their efficacy in inhibiting eosinophil inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity ( it is the case of TPI ASM8 from Topigen analysed in our February 2008 BUA).
However, other chemokines (CCL17, CCL22, CXCL8) may be important and their respective inhibitors are at an experimental stage or in phase II clinical trials.
Th2-derived cytokines have a role in chronic inflammation and airway modelling. If anti-IL-5 mAb have not been shown to be effective, blocking IL-4 and its á–subunit and IL-13 by Pitakinra (already mentioned in our BUA) has been shown to be an interesting approach, whereas anti-IL-13 as well as anti-IL-10 and anti-IL-12 mAb are currently being studied. Curiously, TNF-á has been shown to be a pro-inflammatory cytokine but its blockage was not associated with any clinical improvement of Asthma.
The authors also mention Suplatast tosilate which may inhibit IL-4 and IL-5 and has been slightly effective in a small clinical trial of moderate asthma.
Among the other targets
- phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as roflumilast and cilomilast, active by oral route, have side effects ,similar to those of theophylin, with nausea and vomiting;
- kinase inhibitors such as p38 MAPK, active by inhalation;
- transcription factors such as NFêB or IKK2 inhibitors useful in insensitive to corticosteroids asthma
- other nuclear factors such as PPAR (Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor) which, in association with corticosteroids may have an important anti-inflammatory role. Finally, the development of Immunotherapy targeting regulatory T cells (Treg) and Th17 cells, in combination with D3 vitamin and corticosteroids deserves to be mentioned.
This vast number of studies on biological or synthetic drugs, can be explained by the complexity of asthma mechanisms, but we must remind that targeting only one mediator, or receptor or enzyme is ineffective and meanwhile the development of distinct handprints of different subtypes of the disease, combination of therapies is clearly mandatory.

The beekeeper : a model of immunological tolerance
In an editorial in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (Published online November 10, 2008) Nicole Lebrasseur, quoting work from F. Meiler, observed with humour that better than a murine experimental model, the beekeeper fulfils an old Immunologist’s dream, by revealing that such an intrepid honey lover, kicks into action a group of T Lymphocytes which pass successively from an aggressive mode to a suppressive mode and vice-versa, just like Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.
In fact, due to the nature of their work, non allergic beekeepers receive when they collect honey, repetitive injections of high doses of bee venom antigens (a mean of 13 bee stings during the first week of the season is usual). In this 7 day period, the beekeepers develop tolerance which is associated with an inhibition of T cell responses, both in the skin (absence of late phase reaction) and in the blood (suppression of venom antigen-specific proliferation).

In fact, T cells which happily proliferate, in response to antigen, relax once the season starts and, instead of secreting Interferon-ã and IL 4 , by cytokine switch, start synthesising high levels of IL-10, which dampens immune reactions. These IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (Tr1) decrease the antigen-induced proliferation of other T cells in vitro. This T cell regulation continues as long as antigen exposure persists and return to in initial levels within 2 to 3 months after the season.

Such cytokine switch may require Histamine-related pathways; in fact, just like most allergens, bee venom sets off a release of histamine by mast cells and in vitro T cell studies show that the production of IL-10 and cell lethargy require the intervention of Histamine type 2 receptor (TGF-â does not seem to play an essential role in skin tolerance, in contrast with its action in mucosal tolerance).
It should be noted that such tolerance disappears at the end of the season, indicating a relatively transitory suppression of T cell activity. Afterwards, this cycle is repeated during the following season which allows one to reassure the beekeepers, if need be.

As far as bee venom-allergic individuals (who are generally deficient in IL-10) are concerned, there is no place for great enthusiasm about this finding since it shows that the success of allergen-specific immunotherapy entails a long and persevering maintenance of therapy.

Is Anti-fungal treatment useful in Severe Asthma with sensitisation to Fungi?
This is the question asked by the English authors from the University of Manchester as they analysed, in a randomised study, the response of asthmatic patients sensitised to one or various fungi, to Itraconazole (Randomized Controlled trial of Oral Antifungal treatment for severe asthma with fungal sensitization. D.W. Denning et al. Am.J.Resp.Crit.Care Med 2008, October 23).
58 subjets with severe asthma, treated with inhaled or oral corticosteroids (41% had already been hospitalised in the previous year) and having positive skin tests and/or specific IgE to one or various fungi: Penicillium, Candida, Cladosporium, Botrytis, Trychphyton, Alternaria, and Aspergillus (with the exception of subjets having precipitins against the latter) were recruited at 4 different hospitals. All the subjects had total serum IgE levels lower than 1000UI/ml.
Patients were treated either with Itraconazole orally (200mg/day) or with Placebo for 32 weeks and were subsequently followed for 16 weeks.
A standardised questionnaire with 32 items on Quality of Life of the asthmatic patient, followed by lung function testing, calculation of a rhinitis score and determination of total serum IgE levels were performed. Results were as follows:
At 32nd week, there was a significant improvement of the Quality of Life in nearly 2/3 of the cases (60%), when compared with the Placebo group. In fact, complete data were obtained from 41 subjects who have followed the treatment until the end of the study.
The Rhinitis score also improved, whereas it deteriorated in the Placebo group.
The levels of total serum IgE decreased significantly, dropping from 187 to 136 UI/ml, whereas they increased in the Placebo group, from 245 to 275 UI/ml.
Changes in lung function were modest: only morning peak expiratory flow significantly improved.
Overall, there were only a few cases of exacerbation of asthma (similar in both groups) which required an increase in the doses of corticosteroids or hospitalisation.
There were no severe side effects, but 7 subjects (5 of which were in the anti-fungal group) had to discontinue treatment.
The authors put forward some hypotheses to explain the favourable action of antifungal therapy (which progressively disappears after suspension of the latter): action on the eventual colonisation of airways by the fungi, synergy with corticosteroids, or direct stimulation of the immune system.

Mediterranean diet : Protective factor for Wheezing in pre-school children?
The Mediterranean diet (MD) is regarded in adults as protector for atherosclerosis and its cardio-vascular consequences. It is based upon increased ingestion of fruits and vegetables (anti-oxydants), n3- (fish oils) or n-6 (vegetable oil) polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a moderate ingestion of milk, meat, and avoidance of fast-food : hamburgers, fried foods, industrial cakes, pizzas…

A group of Spanish doctors had already shown that MD was a protective factor for allergy and asthma in children aged between 6 to 7 years (L. Garcia-Marcos et al. Thorax 2007; 62 : 503-508) and that, in contrast, obesity was a risk factor, particularly in girls. The same group (A. Castro-Rodriguez et al. J. Pediatrics 2008 ; 823-828) extended their epidemiological study to young children from 3 cities in the Southeast of Spain. They hand out questionnaires to the parents of 1784 children (mean age of 4 years), in searching children wheezing (asthma equivalent) in the previous year. The authors set up a score for MD according to the intake frequency of pro- and anti-MD foods.
A potent multivariate and logistic regression statistical analysis also incorporating family history of these children showed that, ingestion of Paracetamol, eczema, rhino-conjunctivitis and paternal asthma were significant risk factors for wheezing in children. In contrast, MD and the child’s older age were protective factors.

The authors acknowledge the difficulties in interpretation of these food questionnaires and cannot give advice on the amounts of such food necessary to ensure a protective effect. Therefore, they can only suggest a balance favouring pro-MD foods and pointing towards avoidance of risk foods.

Source: CEFCAP

You may send your comments to these short news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

{tab=Jun 2008}

June 2008
Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

• Recent data on Peanut Allergy
• Multiple sensitisation to Pollens : its interpretation
• Persistence of Di-isocyanate-induced asthma
• Angioedema due to angiotensin -converting -enzyme inhibitors
• Bakers’ asthma: an alternative to challenge tests

Recent data on Peanut Allergy
A comprehensive review on this topic reminds us that it is a major health problem in developed countries (A. Wensley Burks. Peanut Allergy Lancet 2008; 371: 1538-1546). It is important to point out : the increasing frequency of this type of allergy, particularly among under 3 years of age children, the characteristic symptoms (cutaneous, respiratory, gastro-intestinal, anaphylactic) that may arise within a few seconds to 2 h after ingestion of some mg of protein (let us remember that a single grain is equivalent to 300mg) or, among older patients after a simple skin or mucosal contact (the famous fatal kiss: Wuhtrich 1997); the treatment of anaphylactic shock, the prevention by correct labelling of food products (12 allergens of the European Directive 2003) are also mentioned.
Nevertheless the quality of life of these allergic patients and their families is severely impaired by the permanent anguish of a possible anaphylactic reaction.
Among recent data, let us stress the identification and cloning of various allergens (Arachis hypogea) : 8 are known : Ara h 1 and 2: the major allergens which are storage glycoproteins, Arah 5 is a profilin, Arah 8 belongs to the PR10 family. However, whereas in the case of aeroallergens IgE binding is conformational, it is linear for epitopes on Arah 1, 2 and 3 allergens, which might explain the severity of clinical signs. The diagnosis is most often made on the basis of clinical history, skin prick tests and specific IgE (CAP-RAST) whose levels must be higher than 14 kU/l. In doubtful cases, it is possible to perform skin prick tests with recombinant allergens . Only rarely is it necessary to perform double blind, placebo controlled peanut challenges.
The recent development of transgenic plants that produce hypoallergenic peanuts or the introduction of anti-sense RNA copies of the allergen or even the degradation of post-translational messenger RNA should be highlighted (one can question whether it is still a peanut after all these manipulations).
Indeed there is not yet a preventive treatment having proven its efficacy and tolerance in humans. Trials that are currently ongoing with recombinant allergens and eventually sub-lingual immunotherapy may be promising (as has been done with hazelnuts). However the author thinks that we will have a valid treatment within 5 years.

Multiple sensitisation to Pollens : its interpretation
Allergist has frequently to face this situation, often asks how to interpret skin and biological tests and wonders about their pertinence. J.F. Fontaine (Reims) has attempted to answer to the problem, by studying the molecular basis of cross-reactions among pollens as well as between pollens and foodstuffs, showing the contribution of recombinant allergens. (Les recombinants des panallergènes polliniques; application à l’interprétation des polysensibilisations Rev.Fr.d’Allergol. et Immunol.Clin 2007 47 129-132) A multiple sensitisation may include an allergy to grass pollens (Phleo p1 or p5) in association to a cross-sensitisation to other vegetals (birch, for example). Allergy to birch is either symptomatic, eventually associated with an oral syndrome (due to the allergen Bet v1) or asymptomatic (due to Bet v2). The author therefore suggests that, in cases which are difficult to interpret, one should resort, besides the classical RAST tests, to the CAP-RAST technique (Pharmacia®) using recombinant allergens of the profilin family (rBet v2 or rPhleo p12) or of the polcalcin family : calcium-binding allergens (rBet v4 or Phl p7).

Thus, for example, the presence, in an individual who is allergic to grass pollens, of specific IgE to rBet v2- or rPhl p 12- IgE without sensitisation to rBet v1 means that a positive skin test to birch is in fact, a reaction to profilins . A hypersensitivity to grass, tree and weed pollens corresponds to a sensitisation to polcalcines (rPhl p7).
Another example is related to the presence, in individuals with pollinoses.
of Bet v2-specific IgE frequently responsible for pauci-symptomatic or biological sensitisations to various foodstuffs These different molecular families of allergens that are called “ pan-allergens”, and the corresponding vegetables and foodstuffs, are detailed in a well documented table which completes this interesting article.

Persistence of Di-isocyanate-induced asthma
The Finnish Institute for Occupational Diseases has analysed the outcome of 17 patients with diisocyanate (DIs)-induced asthma after cessation of exposure and administration of inhaled corticosteroids (P.L. Piirilä et al (Inflammation and functional outcome in diisocyanate-induced asthma after cessation of exposure. Allergy 2008: 63: 583-591.
Exposure to DIs had stopped, on average, 7 months before the beginning of the study, and all reexposure was excluded after diagnosis. A challenge test with DIs was carried out and was followed, 48h afterwards, by a check-up including: spirometry, bronchial challenge test with histamine, bronchial fibroscopy with biopsy, and bronchoalveolar lavage. It was followed by the prescription of budesonide ®, 1600 ìg/day, given again after 6 months and 2-3 years.
Fifteen healthy subjects made up the control group. At the end of the study there was a decrease or vanishing of bronchial hyper reactivity (BHR) in many patients, except 5 individuals.
Spirometry showed a progressive and significant reduction of forced vital capacity (FVC), and a nearly significant decrease in forced expiratory volume /second (FEV1), without any changes in total lung capacity (TLC).
These changes were independant of smoking habits of the patients.
In terms of histochemistry, the most important aspect was the return to normal of the numbers of lung mast cells and an increase in the number of macrophages. In addition, there was an increase in the levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-15 and TNF-á, whose source are macrophages, in patients with BHR.

Overall, this study showed that there was a decrease in Th2-type inflammation and an association between BHR and inflammation, linked to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines mainly derived from macrophages.
This study allows us to understand that Dis-induced asthma, even upon cessation de l’exposition, may become perennial. Furthermore, it also demonstrates the absence of efficacy of inhaled corticosteroids, which underlines the need for therapeutically targeting the macrophage and its cytokines.

Angioedema due to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors
A retrospective, multicentre study involving 5 hospitals in US recorded the cases of Angioedema hospitalised in an Emergency Department following ingestion of drugs with cardiac and anti-hypertensive properties such as the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI).
Between 2003 and 2005, 220 patients were thus identified and demographic and etiological data from each patient were analysed namely in statistical terms (Multicenter study of patients with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema who present to the emergency department. A. Banerji et al ; Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol 2008; 100: 327-332).
Thirty percent of the cases of Angioedema diagnosed in these 5 centres were caused by ingestion of ACEI (95% CI : 26-34%).
The mean age of these mostly hypertensive patients was 60 years. There was a slight predominance of female patients; the prevalence of atopy was lower than in the general population (11% had asthma, 6% had food allergies, 4% had rhinitis, 1% has atopic dermatitis).
The most frequent clinical symptoms were : dyspnoea and swelling of lip, tongue and larynx.
Most patients had been treated with corticosteroids and anti-histamines ; 58% of them were discharged upon hospitalisation, but 11% had to be monitored in a specialised setting and 12% had to be admitted to an Intensive Care Unit, where intubation and ventilation was needed in 10 individuals . There was no death.

The involved drugs were Lisinopril® in 60% of cases, Enalapril ® in 12% of cases, and Benazepril® in 6% of cases . The patients had been on that medication for 6 months, on average (1 to 18 months). For most patients, that was the first episode of Angioedema.

The mechanism of this side-effect of these drugs may be related to the increased levels of bradykinin in the blood and it must be pointed out that clinical trials involving bradykinin receptor antagonists are currently ongoing, particularly for the treatment of Hereditary Angioedema.
The authors acknowledge the limits of interpretation of data in their study but insist upon the relative frequence of this etiology of Angioedema, and the severity of certain clinical forms.

Baker’s asthma: an alternative to challenge tests
V. van Kampen et al (Prediction of challenge test results by flour-specific IgE and skin prick test in symptomatic bakers. Allergy 2008; 63: 7: 897-902) attempted to see whether it was possible to predict challenge test results from the determination of specific IgE or skin prick tests, in flour-related baker’s asthma, like it has been done for other allergens, particularly food-related ones .
All 107 recruited individuals, who had oculo-nasal and/or bronchial manifestations, were submitted to bronchial and nasal challenge tests, serum specific IgE levels were determined and skin prick tests performed: 71 bakers were tested with wheat flour and 95 with rye flour. Positive and negative predictive values, as well as sensitivity and specificity were calculated for different concentrations of specific IgE and different sizes of skin prick test weals. A comparative analysis of IgE levels and weal size in relation to the challenge test, as well as sensitivity / specificity curves were carried out.

It became apparent that the minimal cut-off values, for a positive predictive value of 100%, were 2.32 kU/l of specific IgE (5 mm weal) for wheat, and 9.64 kU/l (4.5 mm weal) for rye. Although the combination of both techniques does not significantly raise the predictive values, their association is useful for quality control.
Indeed the determination of specific IgE is more sensitive, but the recommended lower threshold for skin prick tests seems to have a higher predictive value (particularly for rye flour).
Thus, these 2 criteria are good diagnostic markers among sensitised symptomatic bakers, which makes unnecessary the challenge test.

These texts has been translated in collaboration with L.TABORDA - Covilha (Portugal).

Source: CEFCAP

You may send your comments to these short news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

 

{tab=Dec 2008}

Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

  • Can paracetamol be a cause of Asthma in children ?
  • Objective assessment of Cough in Asthma
  • Is Helicobacter pylori (HP) a preventive factor for Allergy ?
  • Parasitosis in children and Allergy
  • Birch-induced allergic Rhinoconjonctivitis treated with recombinant allergens

Can paracetamol be a cause of Asthma in children?
This is the guesswork of a large European survey: ISAAC in its phase 3 (Association between paracetamol use in infancy and childhood and risk of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. R. Beasley et al. Lancet 2008 ; 372 : 1039-1048). Indeed, since the 80s, paracetamol (P) completely replaced aspirin as anti-pyretic and analgesic in children. This is due to risk of asthma, triggered by aspirin, particularly in atopic children but also Rye’s syndrome (encephalopathy with epileptic attacks and ocular problems.
The authors tried to find out whether exposure to P during intra-uterine life, or the first year of life in infant, as well as at the age of 6-7 years and also in adult, increased the risk of Asthma and/or Allergy. 205,487 children 6-7 years old, from 73 centres in 31 countries were included in this study (questionnaire given to parents). The results showed (multivariate analysis) that the administration of P (at least once per month) during the 1st year of life was significantly associated (OR 1.46) with an increased risk of Asthma at 6 to 7 years of age. Furthermore, usual utilisation of P was associated, in a dose-dependent fashion, with a risk of asthma (OR 1.6 to 3.23, according to moderate or high drug dose, respectively). Morover, use of P during the 1st year and at 6-7 years of age was associated with an increased risk of rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema. Although impressed by the size of the sample and its multi-nationality, the methodology and the power of this statistical analysis, one cannot exclude recall bias (in the responses given by the parents to the questionnaire, translated into various languages), or reporting bias (use of other antipyretics or viral infection).
So the doubt persists. In fact, if the association is plausible, the causal relation between P and Asthma or Allergy cannot be stated, as the authors acknowledge.
Moreover, what antipyretic or analgesic drug one should use in the young child ?. Ibuprofen suggested by some authors does not gather unanimity. Aspirin has not said its last word. Thus, we think that P at moderate doses, because its efficacy and safety profile spanning 50 years, should continue to be the first choice for the treatment of fever and pain, even in allergic or atopic children.

Objective assessment of Cough in Asthma
Few studies have focused on the prevalence of cough in Asthma, and most of those are based on subjective criteria. Some authors suggest that 61% of asthmatic patients complain of cough. Whether it occurs during the night or day, whether it is productive or not, it is not the main symptom mentioned by asthmatic patients. The interesting work reported by P.A. Marsden et al, from Manchester ( JACI 2008 ; 122: 901-907) is the first which performed comparative study between subjective and objective criteria. These latter were obtained through ambulatory monitors allowing 24 hour-long recordings with a count unit : the number of seconds of cough per hour.

The methodology is original and precise: it included a questionnaire (Leicester) with 19 questions on physical, social and psychological aspects, a thorough study of asthma involving lung function studies, a test of bronchial reactivity, an analysis of FeNO, as well as reflex sensitivity through inhalation of citric acid. The subjective scores included an analogue visual scale graded from 1 to 100 and a frequency score graded from 1 to 5. 54 asthmatic subjects were included (these patients were not selected on the basis of their cough) and were compared with a similar number of healthy control subjects. Results were thoroughly analysed statistically.
The conclusions were surprising and very interesting: It is obvious that the frequency of cough was higher in asthmatic patients than in healthy subjects of similar age.
However, the median time spent by asthmatic patients coughing was little , averaging 2.6 seconds per hour (range: 0.0 to 14.0).
In patients with asthma, Cough was more frequent during the day than at night (3.9 seconds per hour versus 0.3 Overall or daytime cough rates were not significantly different between female and male patients. However, women spent more time coughing at night than men. In addition, cough rate showed a weak but significant positive correlation with the subjects age.
Objective time spent coughing was weak to moderately associated with subjective cough scores and visual analogue scales. but was not correlated with functional tests, namely bronchial reactivity, FeNO or reflex sensitivity to citric acid.
In contrast, objective time spent coughing was strongly correlated with scores of quality of life questionnaire. These notions underline the interest of objective cough recordings for all therapeutic interventions directed towards this Asthma symptom, but also for all cough-inducing causes. In this regard let us also remember a physical discipline : strioscopy, which studies the dynamics of gas flows; its application to the study of cough has shown that its generates warm air with a mean speed around 8 metres/second.

Is Helicobacter pylori (HP) a preventive factor for Allergy?
The inverse relationship between bacterial colonisation by HP and the presence of Asthma or Allergy reported by Chen and Blaser (J. Infect. Dis. 2008 ; 198 : 553-60) led some scientists to study the mechanism accounting for this possible protective effect. Thus, an Italian team (G. Del Prete et al. Immunosuppression of Th2 response in Trichinella spiralis (TS) infection by HP neutrophil-activating protein. JACI 2008 ; 122 : 908-913) infected various murine strains with the TS parasite, which triggered eosinophilia, and increases in the serum levels of total and specific IgE, as well as those of IL-4 and IL-5. In this model, the authors showed that in animals treated with Neutrophil activating protein (NAP) there was an anti-Th2 activity with a decrease in eosinophilia and in the plasma concentrations of IgE, IL-4 and IL-4, associated with an induction of IL-12 and INFã expression.
In addition, the simultaneous administration of an anti-Toll Like receptor 2 monoclonal antibody abrogated the immunosuppressive action of HP-derived NAP on Th2 activity as well as its Th1-inducing activity.

This HP-NAP-derived immunosuppressive activity was confirmed by Codolo et al belonging to the same working group(Cell Microbiol. 2008 August 15) who showed, in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma, that systemic and mucosal administration of recombinant NAP abrogated pulmonary eosinophilia, and reduced the serum levels of IgE and Th2 cytokines.

Thus, the HP- NAP / asthma antagonism, suggested by clinical observations and confirmed experimentally, deserves to be considered.
In this context, recombinant NAP might represent, in the future,
a novel strategy for prevention of Allergic disorders

Parasitosis in children and Allergy
A group of doctors from Latin America (Brazil and Ecuador), in collaboration with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, has tried to find if, like Hygiene hypothesis in developed countries, intestinal helminthic infestation during early childhood might account for a lower prevalence of allergic reactions and asthma later in childhood and intervene upon the immune system, to induce a lower allergen skin test reactivity.

The investigators have, therefore, selected 1055 children whose stool examination had shown, in another previous study, intestinal infestation with an helminth : Trichuris Trichiura (TT) in early childhood. Then they performed skin prick tests in these children, a few years later, with common aeroallergens and collected information on potential confounding variables in their statistical analysis (L. C. Rodrigues et al: Early infection with Trichuris trichiura and allergen skin test reactivity in later childhood. Clin. Exp. Allergy 2008 ; 38 : 1769-1777). The results are as follow: Children with heavy infections with TT in early childhood had a significantly reduced prevalence of allergen skin test reactivity in later childhood, even in the absence of intestinal infestation at the time of skin testing.

Thus, for these authors and in emerging countries, massive infestation with TT
in early childhood seems to play a protective role against skin reactivity to aeroallergens. Novel treatments programming immune regulation in the early child by mimicking the effects of the TT parasite might offer a new research avenue for the prevention of allergic diseases.

The chapter of correlatins between Parasites and Allergy, which is quite complex and has been the subject of many but not always concordant results, , is thus enriched with an innovative study showing an unexpected positive relationship.

Birch-induced allergic Rhinoconjonctivitis treated with recombinant allergens
The European task force of Recombinant allergens, led by Gabrielle Pauli (Strasbourg) reports a randomised, multicenter, study on birch-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis treated by the recombinant (r) allergen (JACI 2008;122: 951-960). Three types of allergens were compared: rBet v1, a patented birch pollen extract ; nBet v1, a purified natural allergen and a placebo group. 134 adult subjects participated in this study. They were given a weekly injection of the product for 12 weeks, followed by a monthly maintenance administration of 15µ Bet v1 for 2 years (2004 and 2005). All subjects were followed up on a regular basis in clinical and biological terms : 33 subjects on rBet v1, 29 on nBet v1, 29 on Birch pollen extracts and 36 on Placebo.
Results were as follows:
A significant reduction in about 50% of symptoms, rescue medication and cutaneous sensitivities in the 3 treated groups, as compared with the placebo.
group. Clinical improvement was accompanied by an increase in the levels of Bet v1-specific IgG, which was higher in the Recombinant Bet v1 group.
No new IgE specificities were observed in the rBet v1 and nBet v1 groups, whereas there were 3 in the one treated with pollen extract. There were no severe side effects in the Recombinant group. This study thus confirmed the efficacy and safety of recombinant allergens for the treatment of birch pollinosis and the skill of genetic recombination DNA technology for the manufacture of allergen extracts for vaccines.

A novel approach for conversion of allergens as vaccines is the dissociation of allergen molecule between IgE and IgG immunologic activity. This approach was carried out in an animal model by N. Mothes-Luksch et al (Disruption of allergenic activity of the major grass pollen allergen Phl p2 by reasembly as a mosaic protein. J. Immunol. 2008 ; 181 : 4864-4873) who fragmented Phleum allergen into peptides of similar length, then re-assembled them in a different order, which lead the mosaic protein so expressed to the loss of its tridimensional structure, its capacity to bind IgE, and its allergenic activity whereas induced high levels of IgG molecules bind to Phl p2 blocks its binding to IgE.

Source: CEFCAP

You may send comments on these brief news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

 

{tab=May 2008}

Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

• Severe asthma in children and bronchial remodelling
• Justification for Sub-Lingual Immunotherapy (SLIT)
• IgE, atopic eczema and food allergy
• The various facets of asthma in Olympic athletes
• Impact of stress upon asthmatic adolescents

Severe asthma in children and bronchial remodelling:
A French hospital-university team (Lille/Paris) compared structural changes in bronchi after the occurrence (or not) of a bronchial obstructive syndrome in children with severe Asthma (according to American Thoracic Society criteria). (Airway remodeling is correlated with obstruction in children with severe asthma : I.Tillie-Leblond et al Allergy 2008 63 May 533-541). For this study, 25 children aged between 5 and 14 years were recruited : 15 had bronchial obstruction (FEV1 lower than 80% of predicted and not responding to bronchodilators) and 10 did not have bronchial obstruction. A bronchial biopsy was taken and thoroughly examined using immuno-histochemistry . It was concluded that a large number of features were the same in the 2 groups : that applied to basal membrane thickening, epithelial integrity (analysed using EGF and EGF-R markers), collagen I and III deposition in the mucosa (using TGF-â as a marker), the number of eosinophils or neutrophils in the bronchi or gland thickness.In contrast, there was a statistically significant correlation between bronchial obstruction, the thickness of the smooth muscle wall (with increased expression of the MLCK: Muscular Light Chain Kinase enzyme, which reflects contractility) and the extension of the vascular network within the bronchi (as determined by expression of CD31) .Thus, the hypothesis of bronchial remodelling as a consequence of chronic inflammation remains uncertain, given that the age of Asthma in these children did not affect the results. It should also be stressed that structural changes predominantly involving smooth muscle and vascular factors develop early in the natural course of this form of asthma and explain the low efficacy of corticosteroids. It is therefore adequate to envisage a revision of classical therapeutic targets in these severe forms of asthma in children (and subsequently in adults).

Justification of Sub-Lingual Immunotherapy (SLIT):
Three recent articles dedicated to SLIT justify its definitive adoption by the European allergic community, followed by the anglo-saxon one. In a general New England Journal of Medicine review on this issue, A.J. Frew (Sublingual Immunotherapy: NEJM 2008 22 May 358 2259-2264) discusses the indications, the mode of action and the effects of such therapy with its dosage, duration of treatment, its minor secondary effects, its yearly cost, but also its uncertainties concerning, among others, allergen standardisation in line with the absence of an international consensus. Nevertheless, although FDA has not yet approved this form of therapy, the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology has acknowledged, since January 2008, its efficacy and safety for the treatment of pollen-induced allergic rhinitis and asthma. This method, which was initiated in Italy, is currently widely used in Europe. Authors from Madrid have had the idea of comparing the immunological effects of 2 immunotherapy methods: SLIT (11 patients) and SCIT (sub-cutaneous: 12 patients) in 23 house dust allergic children, after a 2 year-long follow up period : Antunez C. et al…2 years follow-up of immunological response in mite-allergic children ; comparaison with sub-cutaneous administration Pediatr.Allergy Immunol 2008 19 3 210-218. Clinical improvement was similar and a decrease in specific IgE /IgG4 ratio was observed from the 1st month onwards with SCIT, after 2 years with SLIT. The authors also observed, in the long run, an increase in CD4/CD8 ratio as well as a decrease in the production of TNF-á and IL-2.
In contrast, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ subpopulation and a decrease in CD8+CD25 subpopulation were only observed with SCIT, with a slight change in the INF-ã/IL-4 ratio, reflecting a re-orientation from a Th2 response to a Th1 one.
There seems to be a slight difference in the immunological response in the peripheral blood during SCIT. In contrast, is there a mucosal protection with SLIT? That is what the authors suggest. And the recent observation by K.C. Bergmann et H. Wolf: Effect of Pollen-specific SLIT on Oral Allergy Syndrome: an observational study WAO Journal May 2008 1(5) 79-84 seems to confirm this hypothesis. For this study, 102 patients with pollen-induced allergic rhinitis, 9 out 10 had a more or less intense oral syndrome to food allergens associated with pollen allergens (such as apple-birch, Artemisia - celery, tomato – grass pollen). They were treated with SLIT for 1 year. The oral allergy syndrome improved in 3/4 of the cases concurrently with an improvement of rhinitis. According to J. Ring (journal editor) this is encouraging in terms of foreseeing a possible future treatment of food allergies by SLIT.

IgE, atopic eczema and food allergy
An international group of paediatric allergists (Early Prevention of Asthma and Allergy in Child study group) investigated IgE responses in young children with atopic eczema (IgE antibody responses in young children with atopic dermatitis U.Wahn et al Pediatr.Allergy Immunol 2008 19 332-336). In this study, 2184 infants, between 13 and 24 months of age, with atopic eczema (Scorad 5-59, representing a moderate eczema score) were tested with the 8 most common allergens. Results showed that 18.7% were sensitised to a single allergen, and 36.8% were polysensitised. The frequency of positive IgE responses to aeroallergens and foodallergens (>0.35 kU/l) correlated with the severity of the cutaneous manifestations. Among these young children, a minority had elevated food allergen-specific IgE levels, which would suggest that there is an increased risk of acute clinical reactions to these allergens (7% to egg, 3% to cow’s milk, 4% to peanut). These observations confirm classical data namely the prevalence of IgE responses to food allergens which is highest during the first year of life whereas respiratory allergens develops between 1 and 2 years of age or later. The approach of this association between atopic eczema /food allergy is discussed in the review about this issue by F. Rancé, from Toulouse (France) (Food Allergy in children suffering from atopic eczema Rancé F. Pediatr.Allergy Immunol.2008 19 279-284) ; 2 cases are discussed as an example: one of the cases is a young child with early onset and severe eczema in whom a food diet excluding suspected allergens improved cutaneous lesions; the second case is that of an older child in whom such diet might have deleterious effects on growth without any improvement of the cutaneous state.

This article is followed by a MCQ type questionnaire such as those build-up for Continuous Medical Education (CME).

The various facets of asthma in Olympic athletes
The experience of the athletes of the Finnish Olympic team was analysed in the publication by Haahtela T. et al (Mecanisms of asthma in Olympic athletes – Practical implication. Allergy. 2008 Jun;63(6):685-9).
Extreme exercise conditions among elite athletes may be the source of respiratory manifestations. So, in short duration speed and power efforts or endurance tests in swimmers and long distance skiers, hyperventilation (≥ 200 l/m) has a cooling and drying effect on the airways, and also stimulates vagal nerve endings and bronchoconstriction. Among swimmers, aspiration of a large number of droplets of water full of chemical products (chlorinated products, in particular) induces, by irritation, a vagally-mediated bronchoconstriction as well as bronchial hyperreactivity. Hyperventilation is also associated with the inhalation of important amounts of allergens, domestic aeroallergens and/or pollens depending on the environment (indoor or outdoor exercise), and constitutes, a risk factor for atopy and asthma as reflected by the increase in prevalence of IgE-dependent manifestations among young athletes. The mechanisms vary according to the sport and individual athlete, depending on the aetiology but also on clinical phenotypes. At least two phenotypes are evident, thereby reflecting the existence of distinct mechanisms : the phenotype of early onset infant asthma, which is atopic and combines hyperreactivity to metacholine and an eosinophilic inflammation of the airways with an increase in exhaled NO ; and the other phenotype which includes late onset manifestations (developing during the sports career), bronchial hyperreactivity with the isocapneic hyperventilation test, and not necessarily with metacholine challenge, and which is not associated with markers of atopy.
A mixed type of bronchial inflammation, both eosinophilic and neutrophilic seems to specifically affect swimmers, ice hockey players and long distance skiers. In this case, inflammation may be both allergic and irritant.
It should be stressed that asthma in athletes is under- or over-diagnosed and is therefore an important source of therapeutic problems.
In general, in order to assess the temporal link between asthma and competition sports practise, one must take into account individual predisposition, environmental factors, and the intensity of training.
See at www.cefcap.com the file on Allergy and Sport and the file on Asthma in 2005 Updates.

Impact of stress on asthmatic adolescents
Recent studies suggesting that psychosocial factors may have an impact on asthma, account for the work of Turyk ME et al (Stressful life events and asthma in adolescent. Pediatr. Allergy Immunol. 2008 19:255-263).
The 2026 participants, high school students from Catholic Private Schools of Chicago as well as from State public schools, were aged between 12 and 14 years. Diagnosis of asthma and information on types and number of stressful events, during the previous 12 months, were the object of an anonymous questionnaire.
This questionnaire included a 15-item stressful life events inventory that encompassed traditional items featuring in established life event instruments, family life elements, sources of ill being, relationship and school difficulties and items relating to inner city youths such as gang violence, stabbings and shootings.
Anonymity of the questionnaire, facilitated the collection of information regarding drug use. Of all the participants, there were 315 asthmatic adolescents 1711 non-asthmatic, served as a control group. Overall, asthma was significantly associated with the number of stressful events faced by urban adolescents. Similar results were observed for respiratory symptoms and the other markers of morbidity : school absenteeism, hospitalisations, and physician visits due to asthma.
These associations were independent of exposure to tobacco smoking in the family, use of inhaled substances, sociodemographic factors, or home dampness.
On their own, these results do not allow to conclude to a formal cause-effect link between asthma and stress. However, by analysing and listing the effects of stressful events, the clinician may be helped in terms of preventive and therapeutic approach to the disease among these adolescents.

These texts has been translated by L.TABORDA Covilha (Portugal).

Source: CEFCAP

You may send your comments to these short news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

 

{tab=Apr 2008}

Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE
Paris (France)

  • Occupational respiratory allergy in apprentices and Atopy
  • Insight into the pathophysiology of asthma and bronchial hyperreactivity
  • Asthma during pregnancy and congenital malformations
  • Bêta-blockers and asthma :
  • Are beta-blockers useful in Asthmatic patients ?
  • Are beta-blockers a good option in elderly asthmatic patients ?
  • Can all proteins become allergens ?

Occupational respiratory allergy in apprentices and Atopy :

The team of JL Malo, in Montreal, specialised in occupational allergy and asthma, has carried out a long term (8 years) study on the outcomes of 408 apprentices exposed to high molecular weight allergens, such as flour, latex, and laboratory animal allergens (Long term outcomes in a prospective cohort of apprentices exposed to high-molecular-weight agents : American J. Resp. Crit Care Medicine 20008 177 871-879 D.Gautrin et al). The objectives of the study were to assess the frequency of new and persisting sensitisation, rhino-conjunctival symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in relation with job history after ending apprenticeship and to examine characteristics significantly associated with the incidence and remission of these outcomes.

A respiratory symptom questionnaire, skin prick-tests with the suspected allergens, spirometry and metacholine challenge test were used for this study together with an appropriate statistical analysis. Within the group of individuals who, at a given time of the observation period of the study, held a job related to their apprenticeship (78% of the cases) the incidence of sensitisation, rhino-conjunctival symptoms, bronchial symptoms or bronchial hyperreactivity was, respectively, 1.3, 1.7, 0.7 and 2.0 per 100 person-years. Within the group of individuals who started a job different from that of their apprenticeship, a remission was observed respectively in 18.5, 9.6, 9.6 and 12.4 per 100 person-years. The authors stressed that allergic reactions acquired during apprenticeship did not dissuade individuals from engaging in an activity in the same field (8 out of 10) and they don’t seem to have regretted it since, overall, the incidence of allergic manifestations was lower during the work period than during their apprenticeship. In addition, a high proportion of individuals who started an activity different from the one they had during their apprenticeship had a remission of symptoms. This is a particularly interesting result for atopic individuals who are normally advised to avoid careers where they may be exposed to the inhalation of high molecular weight particles (Laboratory Animal Caretaker or Dental Hygienist or Baker). As mentioned in the editorial of the review, this may be the “end of the tunnel” in this context for atopic individuals.

Insight into pathophysiology of asthma and bronchial hyperreactivity
In a previously work GL. Chupp et al, observed that the serum and pulmonary levels of a component of human cartilage, YKL-40 protein, also known as chitinase 3-like 1 protein, was correlated with asthma severity and bronchial remodeling.

The genetic aspects of this finding is related in a recent publication (Ober et al : Effect of variation in CHI3L1 on serum YKL-40 level, risk of asthma and lung function ( NEJM 2008; 358 : 1682-91,).

The study involves 1893 individuals from various populations: 753 Hutterite farmers, a sect of German descent living in South Dakota, Two control groups of European descent, with one including 638 children living in Freiburg, and the other 296 adults and children living in Chicago, as well as 206 children from Wisconsin, of European descent at high risk of asthma, belonging to COAST (Childhood Origins of Asthma Cohort Study),.

Links between the genetic polymorphism found at the CHIL3 (SNP – 131 C→G) susceptibility locus and the serum levels of chitinase-3 like 1 (YKL-40) protein were investigated.

Within the Hutterite population, increased YKL-40 levels were conditioned by the – 131 C allele (found in CC and CG genotypes) which was correlated with asthma, bronchial hyperreactivity, and lung function changes, in contrast with the protection afforded by the -131G allele. The -131C allele also allowed the prediction of asthma within the two control cohorts at Freiburg and Chicago.

In addition, within the group of children from the COAST study, analysis of CHI3L1 SNPs allowed to predict the levels of YKL-40 in the cord blood and as well as in peripheral blood, until children were 5 years old.

Given the proliferation of genetic studies in asthma, these findings need for large epidemiological studies to be confirmed. However it may be observed that the switch at a single amino acid within the terminal portion of the CHI3L1 gene is associated to disease or to protection against asthma.

In spite of absence of correlation between the levels of YKL-40 and asthma beyond 6 years of age, or between YKL 40 and atopy, this work opens the way to research projects on pathophysiology of asthma and bronchial hyperreactivity.

 

Are beta-blockers useful in Asthmatic patients ?

This is an apparently paradoxical question since it is known that they are clinically contra-indicated in asthmatic patients where they may cause acute bronchospasm.

However, the concept of such antagonism as defined by Sir James Black (Medicine Nobel Prize 1972) between â2-agonists such as Salbutamol and Beta-blockers (Bbls) has been discarded by a recent experimental study (L.P.Nguyen et al :Chronic exposure to beta-blockers attenuates inflammation and mucin content in a murine asthma model Am.J.Cell.Mol.Biol 2008 38 256-262).

Chronic administration of beta-blockers for 7 to 28 days, in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma, decreased bronchial hyperreactivity, reduced eosinophilic inflammation, decreased IL-13, IL-10, IL-5 and TGF-â1 secretion and reduced mucin content within the bronchial epithelium. This was achieved using 2 types of Bbls : a non selective one : Nadolol (Corgard®) and a selective one : ICI 118551 (not yet sold in pharmacy) .

Can we extrapolate these results to humans?

Various recent studies on the effects of Propranolol (®) and Metoprolol (®) in asthmatic or COPD patients with heart failure have shown deleterious side-effects on their respiratory status. Only Celiprolol (Celectol(®)) and, possibly Nadolol would be relatively tolerated by asthmatic patients, maybe at low doses in mild asthma and in prolonged administration. However, in any case, it is necessary to assess benefit/risk ratios. This implies a close collaboration between allergo-pulmonology and cardiology specialists. In practical terms it is still advisable to avoid Bbls in asthmatic patients, even by ocular route (as one of us had the opportunity to note in a patient). The taboo is still valid!

 

Are beta-blockers a good option in elderly asthmatic patients ?

In order to try and answer this other question, a meta-analysis including 29 prospective studies was performed in 2002 by Salpeter SR et al (Cardioselective beta-blockers in patients with reactive airway disease. a meta-analysis : Ann intern Med. 2002 ;137 :715-725). These authors did not observe any changes in FEV1, or in the clinical status, after the administration of beta-blockers (Bbls) in individuals with bronchial hyperreactivity. However beta-blocker administration did not exceed 4 weeks and the study only involved a limited number of patients 40 to 51 years old.

Another retrospective study (M.A. Rank et al: â blockers prescription in elderly patients with asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Apr;121(4):1061-2.) included 390 individuals between 65 and 85 years of age, who were selected by randomisation between 2004 and 2006. All had asthma and coronary disease . 200 patients with isolated coronary disease, and similar age range, form the control group.

The authors aimed at answering four questions :

- Are Bbls prescriptions on the increase ?

- Are Bbls less frequently prescribed in elderly asthmatic patients ?

- Are doses prescribed to this type of patients lower ?

- Does the degree of asthma severity influence Bbls prescription ?

 

Taking as a reference the pilot study by Gottlieb et al, ((Effect of Beta-Blockade on Mortality among High-Risk and Low-Risk Patients after Myocardial Infarction….NEJM 1998339 :489-497), we can observe, , a clear increase in the rate of Bbls prescriptions, which went from 34% to 56%. Such prescriptions were, however, less frequent in the group of patients who had both coronary disease and asthma (45% versus 75%). In contrast, Bbls doses prescribed are equivalent in both groups, and prescription rates are independent of asthma severity degree, which allows to think that the elderly patients tolerates Bbls more than is currently accepted.

However the results of this study should be confirmed by prospective studies.

Asthma during pregnancy and congenital malformations

Are asthma exacerbations during the first trimester of pregnancy associated with congenital malformations? This has been the object of a study involving a cohort of 4344 pregnant asthmatic patients (Lucie Blais et al : Asthma exacerbations during the first trimester of pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformations among asthmatic women, JACI 2008 Apr 12; [Epub ahead of print] ). Clinical episodes were recorded on the basis of corticosteroid prescriptions, visits to emergency departments and hospitalisations due to asthma, whereas the presence of malformations was assessed at birth and during the first year of life. Thus, within this cohort of asthmatic patients, 398 (9.2%) newborns had at least one malformation and the latter had a major feature in 261 of them. The prevalence of these congenital malformations was 12.8% and 8.9%, respectively in pregnant women that had had asthma exacerbations during the first trimester of their pregnancy or not, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for malformations of 1.48 (95% IC, 1.04-2.09) in favour of the former. If applied to major malformations, OR would be 1.32. These statistically significant results demonstrate, according to the authors of this study, the risk of fetal congenital malformations in case of asthma inadequately controlled in early pregnancy and suggest that increased surveillance of the respiratory status of asthmatic pregnant women should be increased during the first trimester.

(Cf Consequences of asthma on pregnancy)

 

Can all proteins become allergens ?

We know that allergens are most frequently proteins. The question is to know whether allergenic proteins have features that are different from those that are not allergenic and whether the sensitisation to the former depends upon their concentration, their source and/or exposure route (respiratory, cutaneous or digestive) . The usual classification between aero-allergens and food allergens had allowed the realisation that there were common features between some protein families (Profilins, Tropomyosin, Bet v1) .

In a recent study based on the fusion of european (Allergome) and international (Allfam) databases, a group of Austrian and Italian authors have put forward a new classification based on sequence, structure and functions of proteins.

Allergens are distributed into few protein families and possess a restricted number of biochemical functions C. Radaeur et al JACI 2008 124 847-52.

Thus it seems that out of 3012 known families of proteins, only 5% of them contain allergens and most can be grouped into some functional classes such as : hydrolytic enzymes, metal-, lipid- or polysaccharide-linked proteins, storage proteins and proteins of cytological skeleton. For instance, the Der p1 major allergen of house dust is a cystine protease which directly acts on immune system cells, particularly on dendritic cells, by cleaving surface proteins. Food allergens are characterised by their high content in dissulphide bridges which ensure their stability and allow them to resist to heat and digestive secretions.

Thus, structural and functional features that turn a restricted group of proteins into allergens, allow a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen sensitisation and open the way to novel therapeutic targets, at the onset of such allergic process.

 

These texts have been translated by L. Taborda, Covilha (Portugal).

Source: CEFCAP

 

You may send your comments to these short news to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

 

{tab=Mar 2008}

Claude MOLINA and Franz MARRACHE

  • Anaphylaxis to Monoclonal Antibody : Cetuximab
  • Eosinophil markers and corticosteroid tapering in Asthmatic patients
  • Classical Alternaria Alternata-specific immunotherapy: Randomised study
  • Mepolizumab and Hypereosinophilic Syndrome
  • Geohelminthiasis and anti-IgE treatments : potential risks

Anaphylaxis to a Monoclonal Antibody : Cetuximab

 

Monoclonal antibodies are the therapeutic innovations of the beginning of the 21st century, successfully used in Allergy (Omalizumab) and in Oncology.

Cetuximab (Erbitux® or Mabthera® ) is a chimeric mouse-human IgG1 Monoclonal antibody_ against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor or EGFR. It is approved for the treatment of - colo-rectal cancers and squamous tumors of the head and neck . In some areas of the US hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with a high frequency (prevalence of 22% of cases in Tennessee and North Carolina but of 1% in the Northeast, and - an average 3%, as mentioned by drug company leaflets).

That is - why the group of Prof. Platts-Mills analyzed serum samples for anti-Cetuximab IgE antibody, particularly in individuals who had had severe allergic reactions anaphylaxis-type at the beginning of Monoclonal antibody perfusions (Cetuximab-induced anaphylaxis and IgE specific for Galactose-á-1,3-Galactose : C.H. Chung et al NEJM 2008 158 1109-1117).Then they extended their study to 76 individuals who had been on Cetuximab treatment (in Tennessee, Arkansas and North Carolina) and 72 controls in Tennessee, 49 individuals with head and neck cancers in California and 341 female control individuals in Boston. Among 76 treated individuals, 25 had hypersensitivity reactions to drug and 17 of these had Cetuximab-specific IgE antibodies, before treatment. In contrast, there was only one individual with Cetuximab-specific IgE among the remaining 51 individuals . Within the the 2nd group (control), 15 out of 72 had IgE antibodies against Cetuximab (20.8%). In the 3rd group, there were 3 Cetuximab-specific IgE+ individuals out of 49 (6.1%). Within the 4th group, there were 2 Cetuximab-specific IgE+ individuals out of 341 (0.6%). These IgE antibodies were shown to be specific for an oligosaccharide which is present on the F(ab’)2 region of Cetuximab heavy chain : Galactose-á-1,3-Galactose. They are not anti-murine protein antibodies (there is no connection with the other monoclonal antibodies such as Rituximab or Infliximab); in contrast, there is a clear correlation with antibodies against non-primate mammalian proteins : cat, dog and cow, but not against mites or pollens. The authors cannot explain the regional differences observed, but they draw attention to the need for detection of anti-Cetuximab IgE prior to treatment with this monoclonal antibody since in most subjects who had ractions to the drug, IgE antibodies were present before therapy. One may also ask whether this notion also applies to other monoclonal antibodies.

Eosinophil markers and tapering of corticosteroids in Asthmatic patients

It is known that the association of Long acting beta-agonists (LABA) to corticosteroids is more efficient than isolated drugs, and allows corticosteroid tapering. A group of Danish authors has tried to evaluate the risk associated with corticosteroid tapering, based on eosinophil markers (EM) which are regarded as signs of bronchial inflammation. 61 patients recruited in 5 Danish hospitals, and efficiently treated with doses between 750 and 1000mcg/day of Corticosteroids were randomised into 2 groups : one of the groups received the minimal dose of 500mcg Fluticasone® + 50mcg Salmeterol ®, and the other group were given 500mcg Fluticasone alone. Once Asthma was well controlled, corticosteroid doses were reduced every 6 weeks, as clinical parameters and EM were monitored, until asthma symptoms eventually reappeared or patients kept on placebo (Asthmatics able to step down from inhaled corticosteroid treatment without loss of asthma control have low serum eotaxin/CCL11 : H. J. Hoffmann et al, Clinical Respiratory Journal 2008; DOI:10.1111/j.1752-699X.2008.00054.x.)

9 patients could be kept on placebo for 6 weeks, 36 patients developed mild Asthma symptoms , 16 had severe symptoms . EM were monitored in 39 cases (blood eosinophils, EPO, ECP, and chemokines : eotaxin/CCL11, eotaxin 2/CCL24, eotaxin 3/CCL26) and Th2 cytokines : IL1-â, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-á, INF-ã. Among the EM, eotaxin/CCL 11 seemed to be the most discriminating variable : patients who were able to be kept on placebo without developing severe symptoms had noticeably lower eotaxin levels than those who developed moderate or severe Asthma.

Thus, eosinophilic chemokines are, according to the authors, a useful guide for the tapering of corticosteroids in Asthmatic patients.

Alternaria Alternata-specific classical immunotherapy : Randomised study

Fungi are, after house dust mites and pollens, the 3rd most important cause of respiratory allergies. Among allergy-inducing fungi, besides Aspergillus and Penicillium,Cladosporium is the most frequent one in the North of Europe whereas Alternaria seems to predominate in Mediterranean regions. In any case, desensitisation to fungi does not have a great reputation of efficacy or tolerance induction. Spanish authors carried out a treatment with a metabolic extract -previously standardised and controlled, (by skin prick testing and immuno-enzymology) in a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study, involving 28 patients between 7 and 29 years of age (of which 14 were controls) who had Rhinitis with or without associated Asthma and were monosensitised to Alternaria . (Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Alternaria alternataAna I. Tabar et al Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, February 2008 Volume 19 Issue 1 Page 76-81). immunotherapy: Clinical efficacy and safety

The protocol followed was a classical one, performed in accordance with the criteria of the EAACI. : one injection per week of a progressively higher dose of allergen extract until a maintenance dose was achieved (or the maximal tolerated dose), then once monthly for 6 to 12 months ( 1670 BE Units, corresponding to 0.167mg of lyophilised extract containing 0.1µg Alt a 1 ).

23 patients were able to complete the treatment with only 2 developing minimal side effects such as cutaneous pruritus.
It took 6 months to observe a significant improvement in all respiratory symptoms (measured clinically and with daily clinical scores) in the treated group. FEV1 was also significantly increased, but not in the placebo group. Asthma severity was decreased only in the treated group, but the symptoms of rhinitis or rhino-conjunctivitis were decreased in both after one year of treatment .

Thus, in this randomised study involving a limited number of patients and including a regular count of Alternaria spores in the environment of both randomised groups of patients, desensitisation, which was well tolerated, was efficacious at decreasing respiratory symptoms and function, but its effects were less clear upon rhino-conjunctivitis .

It is nevertheless a kind of rehabilitation of specific immunotherapy at a time where its efficacy is doubtful, even among allergists.

Mepolizumab and hypereosinophilic Syndrome

 

Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) includes a group of illnesses that are associated with blood eosinophilia > 1000 eosinophils/ml and eosinophil tissue influx into affected organs. Manifestations may be variable and may include respiratory, cardiac, gastro-intestinal, muscle and skeletal, cutaneous and neurological symptoms. Efficacy of corticosteroids in most HES cases is acknowledged, but is associated with side effects that may involve an important morbidity.

Taking into consideration the involvement of interleukin-5 (IL-5) in the development of eosinophils from their bone marrow precursors, as well as its role in the maturation, differentiation, mobilisation, activation and survival of this cell type, it was thus logical to ask whether using a humanised anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody might be associated with corticosteroid-sparing effects in HES.

An international, multicentre, double blind study was performed between March 2004 and March 2006 by the Mepolizumab Group. NEJM published the results in a recent article (M.E. Rothenberg et al , Treatment of Patients with theEosinophilic Syndrome with Mepolizumab. NEJM march 20, 2008 vol. 358 no. 12)

Out of 107 recruited patients who were negative for the FIP1L1–PDGFRA fusion gene (which allows exclusion of cases of myeloproliferative HES, which usually require treatment by Imatinib) 87 individuals were selected and randomised into 2 goups : Mepolizumab group (MG) and placebo group (PG). All selected patients were clinically stabilised on a daily dose of 20 to 60 mg prednisone or prednisone equivalent, and their blood eosinophilia was < 1000/ml. Mepolizumab at a dose of 750mg or placebo were given as intravenous perfusion every 4 weeks for the duration of the study (36 weeks). The main objective of the study was to decrease prednisone or prednisone- equivalent to 10mg/day or even less for 8 consecutive weeks or even longer.

Within the MG group, 36/43 participants (84%) were able to achieve the protocol until its conclusion whereas in the PG only 36% of patients were able to do so. The clearly more frequent patient dropouts within the PG group were particularly linked to the re-occurrence of symptoms due to the decrease in corticosteroid dose.

The objective was attained in 84% of patients of the MG group versus 43% within the PG group. A reduction in corticosteroid doses to < 10 mg/day without destabilisation of the clinical status or an increase in eosinophilia was possible for a period of 8 weeks in almost all MG patients whereas it was only possible in 41% of PG patients.

Severe reactions, not associated with the drug, were observed with a similar frequency in both groups (5 to 7 patients). Drug-related side-effects were varied, not severe and were not more frequent in any of the groups.

In conclusion, Mepolizumab, which targets eosinophils, seems to allow a steroid-sparing effect in HES patients that are negative for the FIP1L1–PDGFRA fusion gene.

Geohelminthiases and Omalizumab : potential risks

 

If the role of IgE antibodies in anti-parasite defense is not denied, their place deserves to be clarified as mentioned byP.J. Cooper et al, (Geohelminth infections: a review of the role of IgE and assessment of potential risks of anti-IgE treatment, Allergy 2008: 63: 409–417).

In order to try and assess the potential role of IgE responses against helminths in humans and the possible risk associated with treatment by Omalizumab, the authors cite the study carried out by Cruz AA et al (Safety of antiimmunoglobulin E therapy with omalizumab in allergic patients at risk of geohelminth infection. Clin Exp Allergy2007;37:197–20).

In this study, 137 Brazilian patients, with a high risk of parasitic infection, aged between 12 and 30 years, with asthma or perennial allergic rhinitis were selected. Before the beginning of the study, an adequate anti-helminthic treatment was given to the patients in order to free them from any parasitic infection. In this double blind, placebo-controlled, 52 week-long study, participants included in the active group were given one sub-cutaneous injection of Omalizumab every 2 to 4 weeks.

At the end of the study, the rate of parasitic infections was practically identical in both groups. There was a slightly higher, but not significant, morbidity within the actively treated group, with a more relevant propensity of these individuals for re-infection.

Overall, risks that allergic patients on Omalizumab treatment face depend upon the type of population, the degree of exposure and the nature of the parasitic infection :

- negligible risk for populations who live in the European Union or the US, in case of minimal exposure, and very low risk in case of short exposure, as when on holidays, for instance;

- low risk for prolonged stays such as those involving volunteers that work in missions abroad (risk that depends upon the nature of the parasite);

- low to moderate risk for migrants originating from endemic areas;

- in contrast, increased vigilance is necessary for individuals having had previous infection with Strongyloides, given the ubiquitous feature of this parasite.

 

Source: CEFCAP

 

You may send your replies or comments to these notes to: cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

 

 

A must-attend event for CME Professionals, Providers and Supporters interested in International CME.

1357Mara Xatzipsalti

Second Dpt of Pediatrics“P & A Kyriakou”
Children’s Hospital
23-27 Makrigianni str.
11742, Athens

Tel: +306974456750
marax5873@hotmail.co.uk

 

 

 

I studied Medicine in Athens at National & Kapodistrian Medical University. After my graduation I started my PhD studies, which I have successfully completed in 2005. My thesis dealt with the immunological response to rhinovirus, its survival and the relationship with the asthma exacerbation. This project was conducted in the Allergy Research Laboratories of the Second Dpt of Pediatrics of the University of Athens, under the supervision of Dr N G Papadopoulos. During this period I have been also working as a S.H.O in General Paediatrics of General Hospital  of Asclipio Voula in Athens.

Then I worked as a Research Fellow at Brooke Laboratories, Allergy and Inflammation Research, at the University of Southampton (Prof S. Holgate), where I investigated the deficient immune response of Differentiated Asthmatic Bronchial epithelial cells to Rhinovirus. During my post-doc time I was also working as Clinical Attachment in the outpatient Paediatric Allergy clinic of General Hospital of Southampton.

Since October 2006 I am completing my specialisation in General Paediatrics at the First Dpt of “performing research work in clinical center.

My main research interest focus on interaction between virus infections and asthma with particular emphasis on rhinovirus infections.

JMA Working Group Meeting Minutes

Hannover, 28th of September, 2006

 

Present: Ulrike Raap (UR), JMA Chairperson

Marcin Kurowski (MK), JMA Representative in Immunology Section

Luis Miguel Borrego (MB), JMA Representative in Pediatric Section

Elena Borzova (EB), JMA Representative in Dermatology Section

Chrysanthi Skevaki (CS), JMA Webmaster

Peter Hellings (PH), JMA Representative in ENT Section

 

Apologies from David Groneberg (DG) JMA Representative in Asthma Section

 

  1. Welcome and a report from the task force meeting on the European Exam.

UR welcomed JMA WG in Hannover and congratulated with the beginning of Hannover Allergy School. She also informed about the progress with preparation of the European Exam in Allergy and Clinical Allergology and plans for launching the exam at EAACI Congress in Barcelona, 2008. UR welcomed the suggestions for multiple-choice questions to be sent to her.

 

  1. Reports of JMA Representatives of their section activities.

LMB reported on junior involvement in Anaphylaxis Symposium prepared by Pediatric Section in Lisbon, Portugal. He informed about telephone conference of pediatric Section scheduled for 10th of October.

 

MK informed about the involvement of juniors in EAACI-GA2LEN Davos Meeting, 2007 prepared by Immunology Section.

 

CS presented a report about Allergy School in Chalkidiki and announced the successful start of Case-report series on EAACI website

 

EB presented an annual survey of junior membership of EAACI Dermatology Sections, informed that hand-out materials from Contact Dermatitis Workshop held in Vienna will be e-mailed to Section members. EB reported on JMA involvement in preparation of PG course organized by Derm Section for EAACI Congress in Göteborg.

 

PH reported on participation in preparing of position paper on Chronic Synusitis and Nasal Polyps by ENT Section.

 

UR reported that JMAs are free of charge to join the PG courses which was announced at the latest ExCom meeting. Our group was welcomed to suggest and organize PG courses like the sections.

 

  1. Applications (letters of intention and CVs) for two new open JMA WG positions of JMA Representatives in ENT Section and Pediatric Section were reviewed. There were 3 potential candidates for each section. One application was not accepted because the applicant would reach the age limit at the time of assuming the position in JMA WG. It was agreed to change in JMA WG election procedure that JMA candidates should be 34 years old or under in the year of becoming JMA WG member. The e-mail election voting of new JMA WG members is planned for December 2006 to end of January 2007 and will be announced on EAACI website (UR).

 

  1. It was decided to prepare a leaflet and slides in order to increase of JMA participation and involvement in EAACI activities. MK prepared the content for slides.

 

  1. JMA activities for Göteborg were discussed:

§ JMA Poster Session will be chaired by UR and LMB.

§ JMA Clinical Educational Workshops/PG course is planned by the ENT section, PH is involved as a speaker. EB prepared a JMA PG course on a dermatological topic.

§ JMA Forum “Rocketing airway inflammation” will be chaired by LMB and MK. The speakers at the forum: Chrysanthi Skevaki (Greece), Johanna Makowska (Poland), Gernot Rohde (Germany), Tibor Verres (Germany). UR welcomed chairs to approach speakers and announce their titles as soon as possible.

§ JMA postgraduate course on Biostatistics will be planned. George Konstantinou is suggested as a speaker. The second speaker will be announced.

§ Educational session: “Design and ethics: important tools for the success of your study” will be chaired by EB and PH.

Programme:

i. How to design an experiment (Martin Church, UK)

ii. Ethics in research and clinical studies (Kristof Nekam, NL)

§ was proposed to prepare a survey of the results of EAACI Fellowships (the number of papers published, etc). Arrangements were made to obtain the list of winners from ExCom.

 

  1. Allergy Schools:

§ Hannover Allergy School: CS will prepare the report on HAJ for EAACI website

§  Meeting in Lisbon in October, 2006: LMB is included in the organizing committee

§  Winter School: MK is invited to participate.

 

  1. AAAAI Meeting in San Diego, 2007: MK and EB expressed interest in going.

 

  1. JMA WG decided to prepare a report on JMA perspective reflecting current activities, achievements and perspectives of JMAs in the EAACI together with the last historian Ignacio Ansotegui for publication in Allergy journal.

 

The next JMA WG business meeting is planned for Göteborg, June, 2007.

 

Elena Borzova

EAACI JMA Representative of Dermatology Section

 

Ulrike Raap

EAACI JMA Chairperson

115Ioana Agache
Romania
Faculty of Medicine, Brasov

ibrumaru@unitbv.ro

Education
M.D. 1994, University Carol Davilla Bucarest
Specialist in Allergology and Clinical Immunology 1999

Lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine in Brasov in Clinical Immunology since 1996

Scientific area
Immunopathology of acute coronary syndromes and miocardium diseases, immunology of chamydial infection in atherosclerotic lesions, incidence and clinical profile of the antiphospholipid syndrome, clinical application of immunohistochemistry in an interdisciplinary approach, the value of immunofixation in defining monoclonal gammopathies

627Allergy Research Laboratories
Second Dpt of Pediatrics
“P & A Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital
University of Athens
41 Fidipidou str
11527 Athens
Greece
Tel: +30-210-7776964 (ext14)
Fax: +30-210-7774383
E-mail: cskevaki@allergy.gr

I studied medicine at the Semmelweis University of Medicine, Budapest, Hungary. For the last three years, I have been working as a scientific collaborator in the Infectious Diseases Unit (Prof D A Kafetzis) of the Second Department of Pediatrics of the University of Athens. During this time, I gained interest in pulmonary medicine and more specifically in the field of interactions between infections and asthma. Therefore, during the last year I have started a PhD project, which deals with the influence of rhinovirus infection upon the expression and production of molecules associated with apoptosis, in the context of airway remodeling in asthma. This project is conducted in the Allergy Research Laboratories of the Second Department of Pediatrics of the University of Athens, under the supervision of Dr N G Papadopoulos.

621I studied medicine at the Medical University of Luebeck and Hannover in Germany. My medical thesis about the programmed cell death of peripheral blood eosinophils (summa cum laude) was awarded with the Clemens of Pirquet award in 1999 by the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAI).

During my post-doc time at the Department of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics (Prof Dr Harald Renz) at Marburg University I investigated the functional role of neuropeptides and neurotrophins in murine models of allergic inflammation. The work was awarded with the Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation Award in Berlin 2001 and funded by an investigators grant of the Kempke-Foundation in Marburg. Back at Hannover Medical University I am working as a full specialist for dermatology and allergology at the Department of Dermatology and Allergology (Prof Dr Alexander Kapp). Besides the daily business with the outpatients I am involved in several studies on immunotherapy. My fields of interest are neuroimmune interactions in chronic inflammatory diseases such as allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis, which is funded by a young investigators grant for science of the Hannover Medical University since 2002.

Elections to the Board 2007-2009
EAACI Section on Pediatrics

 

Candidates for 4 open positions:

  • Maarten Hoeckstra,
    Sponsors: Tony Dubois, Hans de Groot
    link to CV
  • Susanne Lau
    Sponsors: Magnus Wickman, Andrea von Berg
    link to CV

EAACI

SECTION ON PEDIATRICS

We hereby cordially invite all members of the Section on Pediatrics to join the:

Annual Business Meeting in Göteborg
Sunday June 10th, 2007, 17:15 – 18:15
Venue: Göteborg EAACI 2007, Congress Center
Room J1
Agenda

§ 1. Opening by the Chairman (Philippe Eigenmann)
§ 2. Registration of members present by name and address
§ 3. Further topics proposed by members to be discussed
under § 11.
§ 4. Election of new board members (Philippe Eigenmann, Election Committee)
§ 5. Financial report for the Section (Antonella Muraro )
§ 6. Education in Europe (Arne Høst, José Lopes dos Santos)
§ 7. “EAACI-Clemens Von Pirquet Foundation” (Philippe Eigenmann)
§ 8. Financial report for the Foundation (Bodo Niggemann)
§ 9. Future meetings, other activities and new projects (Philippe Eigenmann, Antonella Muraro)
§ 10. Further points to be discussed according to § 3.
§ 11. Next Annual Business Meeting in Barcelona, Spain,
June 7 – 11, 2008
§ 12. Closing of the Business Meeting.

Padua, May 2007

 

Philippe Eigenmann Antonella Muraro
Chairman Secretary

XXVIII EAACI Congress
Monday, 8 June 2009
13.30 – 15.00

Severe Asthma: An unmet need?
Chairpersons: Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium, Gunilla Hedlin, Sweden

■ The epidemiology of severe asthma in Europe
Peter Burney, United Kingdom
■ Experiences from a British network of severe asthma in adults
Chris Brightling, United Kingdom
■ Severe problematic asthma, not one entity, but several
phenotypes throughout childhood
Kai-Håkon Carlsen, Norway
■ Towards a global definition of severe asthma
Jean Bousquet, France

The EAACI Section on Pediatrics invites you to the Annual Business Meeting during the XXIII EAACI Congress in Amsterdam, June 2004.

 

 

Three projects have been planned and partly initiated under the EuroBAT collaboration:

1. C. Mayorga has initiated a multicenter drug allergy trial for beta-lactam antibiotics, in which one confirmed drug allergic, one confirmed non-allergic and one allergic patient will be compared. One reference protocol is compared to individual protocols.

2. H.J. Hoffmann and G Sturm have initiated a round robin of basophil activation tests in which maximal response and sensitivity will be determined for one reference protocol and individual protocols. Data sharing will confirm to the MiFlowCyt standard.

3. C Brits and D Ebo plan to compare gating strategies for identifying basophils.

These projects will be discussed at the EuroBAT meeting after the in Warsawa and at the next EuroBAT meeting in the autumn of 2009.

1719The 9th Allergopharma Award, 2009 in the value of Euro 10,000

The Award was first established in 2000 on the initiative of Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG and in collaboration with the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. It is intended that the Award should recognize scientific achievement on the part of younger members of the EAACI in the field of allergy and encourage their engagement in further research. Applications for the Award are therefore restricted to members or affiliates of the EAACI, under the age of 40 years, who have conducted their research in a European centre.

An application for consideration for the award shall take the form of a full research paper published in an international peer reviewed journal in 2006/2008, together with a covering letter and curriculum vitae including a list of publications. The applications will be considered by an ad hoc Commission nominated by the EAACI Executive Committee and Allergopharma. The 9th Award will be presented during the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Congress, Warsaw 2009.

Applications should be submitted before 31 December 2008 electronically to both the EAACI Executive Office (executive.office@eaaci.org) and Allergopharma (oliver.cromwell@allergopharma.de).

The research paper, curriculum vitae and a covering letter should be included as three separate attachments. If this is not possible, then postal applications can be sent to:
EAACI Executive Office
Karlavägen 108, P O Box 24140
115 24 Stockholm, Sweden
Tel.: +46-8-4596623

Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG is committed to furthering excellence in allergy diagnosis and specific immunotherapy through investment in scientific research.

Further information can be obtained from: Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG, 21462 Reinbek, Germany, Phone +49 40 72765-185, Fax +49 40 72765-318, website www.allergopharma.com, e-mail: oliver.cromwell@allergopharma.de.

EAACI and the Local Organising Committee offer 100 travel grants for the XXVII EAACI Congress in Warsaw, 06 -10 June 2009 to EAACI Junior Members and Affiliate Junior Members, with an accepted abstract.

The travel grant application should be made in connection with the electronical abstract submission. The application deadline is 14 January, 2009.

Please note that to apply properly you need to fill in the following, otherwise your Travel Grant application will not be considered:

  • That you wish to apply for the Travel Grant (tick the box)
  • Date of birth (Only juniors up to 35 years can apply)
  • EAACI membership number (You must be a Junior Members or Affiliate Junior Member to apply)
  • If you have received the Travel Grant before
  • Name and e-mail of your supervisor

You must also upload your personal CV.
Those who are awarded a travel grant will receive free registration to the Congress, shared accommodation in a twin-bedded room (up to 4 nights) and travel costs refunded up to 500 EUR.

Two hotels for Juniors will be arranged to facilitate social contacts and the use of common transports. More information about the JMA hotel will be published later.
Travel grant recipients who do not wish to stay at JMA hotel will receive free registration and up to 500 EUR for travel expenses.

Those JMAs who do not receive a travel grant but are anyway interested in reserving this hotel at their own expense can contact Congrex and they will get accommodation on a first come first served basis.

Travel costs will be refunded on site at the Congress, upon presentation of your original tickets and travel receipts.

If the abstract is accepted but your grant application is not approved, you must register and pay the registration fee before 31 March 2009. Otherwise your abstract will be cancelled from the programme and the abstract book.

For abstract submission, click here.

For questions about Travel Grants, please contact the Congress secretariat at eaaci2009abstract@congrex.com
* Virtually Informed: The Internet as (New) Health Information Source
Vienna Interdisciplinary Research Unit for the Study of (Techno)Science and Society VIRUSSS
Date: 25-26 January 2008
Place: Vienna, Austria
For more information email at sec.wissenschaftsforschung (at) univie.ac.atImpressum or go to http://www.univie.ac.at/virusss/rubrik/1002///.

* Joint symposium of the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain
Date: 30 January 2008
Place: Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, London
More information: http://www.rpsgb.org/worldofpharmacy/events/
Click here to download the brochure.

* Egyptian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (ESPAI)
6th International Congress
Date: 21-22 February 2008
Place: Cairo, Egypt

* 64th AAAAI Annual Meeting
Date:14-18 March 2008
Place: Philadelphia, PA, USA

* DGAKI Allergy Workshop
Date: 07 - 08 March 2008
Place: Mainz, Germany
More information: http://www.dgaki.de/

* World Immune Regulation Meeting 2008 - WIRM 2
Date: 17 - 20 March 2008
Place: Davos, Switzerland
Focus on Regulatory Cells and Th17 cells
Abstract submission prolonged until 8 December 2007
More information: http://www.wirm.ch/WTM/Overview.html

* Basic and Clinical Allergy
Date: 31 March - 03 April 2008
Place: London, UK
The programme covers current and emerging concepts as well as an overview of basic principles. To view the announcement for the meeting click here.
More information:http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/nhli/events

* GA²LEN Annual Conference, 10-12 April 2008, Paris, France
GA²LEN plenary session: 11 April 2008
GA²LEN Public Day - francophone: 12 April 2008
More information: www.ga2len.net - GA²LEN Office office@ga2len.net

* 2nd AllergoOncology Symposium
Date: 11-12 April 2008

Place: Lecture Halls of the Medical University Vienna

Level 7, Waehringer Guertel 18-20 1090 Vienna, Austria
Tel: +43 (0)1 40 400 – 5120
Click here to view the program!

For more info click here !!

* 3rd International Symposium on Molecular Allergology
The event is supported by the EAACI and promoted by the Interest Group on Allergy Diagnosis
Date: 18-20 April 2008
Place: Salzburg, Austria
For more information, pleaso go to http://www.isma2008.eu/ .

 

* Drug Allergy for Clinicians
Date: 1 May 2008
Place: Governors Hall, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
For more information, pleaso go to http://www.allergycourses.org or tel. +44 208 906 7778

* 11th EFA Conference Equality in Health for People with Allergy, Asthma COPD in Europe
Main theme: From prevention and self-management to better quality of life
Date: 30 May- 2 June 2008
Place: Sofia, Bulgaria
For more information go to EFA website, http://www.efanet.org/

* GA²LEN Symposium at the EAACI 2008 Congress
Date: 9 June 2008, 10:30 - 12:00, Barcelona, Spain

* 22nd Congress of the European Rhinology Society
27th International Symposium of Infection & Allergy of the Nose
Date: 15-19 June 2008
Place: Crete, Greece
For more information email at ers2008isian@frei.gr
or click on the website http://www.ers2008isian.com/

* ROYAN International Twin Congress
9th Congress of Reproductive Biomedicine - 4th Congress on Stem Cell Biology & Technology
Date: 27-29 August 2008
Place: Tehran, Iran
For more information please go to the website www.royaninstitute.org .

* 12th International Paul - Ehrlich Seminar
Regulatory Control and Standardization of Allergenic Extracts
Date: 24 - 27 September 2008
Place: Bad Homburg, Germany
For more information please go to the website www.pei.de/ipes2008 or download the seminar brochure.

* 2nd Gaslini Advanced Course in Basic and Applied Immunology
Date: 20-25 September 2008
Place: Villa Quartara, Badia della Castagna, Genoa, Italy
Registration deadline: 25 August 2008. Click here to download the Registration Form. Click here to download the Programme of the course.

* ERS Congress
Date: 04-08 October 2008
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information email at info@ersnet.org or visit the website http://dev.ersnet.org.

* 2nd Congress of the European Academy of Paediatrics
Date : 24-28 October 2008
Place: Nice
Congress Venue: Nice - Acropolis
Country Congress: France
Tel: +41 22 908 0488
Fax: +41 22 732 2850
For more info please visit the congress website http://www.kenes.com/paediatrics or contact the secretariat at paediatrics@kenes.com

* XIX World Congress of Asthma
Date: 05-09 November 2008
Place: Monte-Carlo, Monaco
For more information email at wca2008@publicreations.com
or click on the website www.aim-internationalgroup.com/2008/wca

* ERS-GA2LEN Research Seminar: Post Genome Respiratory Epidemiology II:
An interdisciplinary challenge
Date: 06-08 November 2008
Place: Cernay, France
For more information please visit www.ga2len.net

* 7th Symposium on Experimental Rhinology and Immunology of the Nose (SERIN)
Organised by the EAACI ENT Section.
Date: 13-15 November 2008
Place: Dubrovnik, Croatia
For more information please visit the official website www.hdorl.net/serin2008.

* EAACI-GA2LEN Allergy School
Theme: Epidemiology of Allergy and Respiratory diseases
Date: 25-28 November 2008
Place: London, United Kingdom
For more information click here.

* The 16th International Rhinology Update Course
Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital and in cooperation with The Free University of Brussels, Belgium
Date: 24-28 November 2008
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
For more information email at sispi@mahidol.ac.th .

* 3rd International Consensus Meeting on Urticaria
Date: 04-05 December 2008
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information please go to http://www.allergie-centrum-charite.de/index.php?id=1146.

* International Congress on Cytokines in Immune Regulation and Disease
Date: 04-06 December 2008
Place: Palazzo dei Congressi, Auditorium, Florence, Italy
To download the programme click here. For more information click on the website www.cytokines2008.com

The 8th Allergopharma Award was instituted in association with the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to recognise excellent research conducted by younger members of the Academy in the field of mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.The eight Award was presented by the President of the European Academy, Professor Roy Gerth van Wijk, to Dr. Georgina Xanthou during the XXVII Congress of the Academy in Barcelona, Spain.

Dr. Xanthou is a graduate of the University of Athens. The work for her PhD was conducted in the Department of Pathophysiology at the University of Athens Medical School and concerned the role of chemokines produced by antigen presenting cells in the autoimmune disease Sjogren’s syndrome. Chemokines were a continuing theme in her post-doctoral studies with Professor Tim Williams at Imperial College London. Here, she investigated the functional cross-talk between chemokine receptors and the influence on different lymphocyte subsets during immune responses. She returned to Athens to take-up a faculty position at the Biomedical Research Foundation where she is now an Assistant Professor.

Her current work focuses on the role of cytokines, and in particular Osteopontin and Activin-A, in the induction and regulation of T-helper lymphocyte immunity, and the dysregulated immunity associated with allergy and autoimmunity. Dr. Xanthou was chosen to receive the Allergopharma Award on the basis of a publication in Nature Medicine which presents evidence that Osteopontin exhibits dual and opposing effects on T-helper lymphocyte reactivity in allergic disease through regulation of dendritic cell sub-sets.

 

The winner, Georgina Xanthou with (from left) Prof. Wahn, EAACI past president, Lars Ingemann, Allergopharma, and EAACI president Prof. Gerth van Wijk.



 

EAACI offers a number of Educational Grants each year to help members in financial difficulty to cover the cost of their yearly membership. The educational grant includes a subscription to the journals ''Allergy'' and "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology''. All Individual and Affiliate Members in EAACI who can motivate their application are welcome to apply for this grant.

2008 Educational Grant Winners:

Rosa Torres-Blanch
Ahmed Mahrous
Mohammad Fereidouni
Peyman Amini
Sophia Tsabouri
Mona Al-Ahmad
1681Göteborg 2007, Sweden

XXVI EAACI Congress
9-13 June, 2007
CME Accredited.

XXV EAACI Congress in Vienna 2006

10 - 14 June 2006
Vienna, Austria

CME Accredited

The XXV Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 10-14 June, 2006. The meeting’s main theme is “Basic Science in Allergology and Clinical Immunology: a Prerequisite for Improving Patient Care” and it is combined with the celebration of “100 Years of ALLERGY as defined by Clemens von Pirquet”. The EAACI 2006 is hosted by the Austrian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology at Austria Center Vienna, “located between the towers of the "Donau City" and the United Nations headquarters in the most modern part of Vienna” (R Valenta).

710

Source: ''Wien Tourismus''

Vienna, a capital of the “Holy Roman Empire” and the Habsburgian Monarchy is a true melting pot for many European cultures. Additionally, it holds a strong record in the scientific allergy community as it is where the Austrian pediatrician Clemens von Pirquet coined the term ALLERGY for the first time, in 1906, just 100 years ago. It is therefore allergy’s centennial birthday !!!

 

Scientific Programme

The rich scientific programme in Vienna 2006 follows a tradition of the highest standards set in all previous EAACI Congresses. Integrated plenary sessions, symposia, workshops, postgraduate courses, pro- and con- sessions on controversial and topical issues are all included in the scientific agenda, set out “to meet the educational and scientific needs of all clinicians and scientists involved in understanding and managing allergic disorders” (A J Frew). Poster Sessions, one of the most powerful and popular activities of the Congress, will be the meeting point for all attendees, covering topics on basic and clinical allergy, asthma and immunology.

 

The full scientific programme is now available on-line.

 

EAACI General Assembly:12th June 2006, 12.15-13.30 pm.

 

Social Programme
A day at the EAACI Congress never ends on the closure of the sessions. The social programme for Vienna 2006 is planned with daily tours in the historic city center of Vienna,visits to famed and distinguished museums, operas, and short excursions to small wineries and vineyeards.

 

55A special event is included for the first time in the Social Programme. The 1st EAACI Allergy 10km Run took place on Saturday, 10 June 2006, at 10.00 am (20 EUR).

 

Registration

On-line registration to the Congress is available from Congress website www.congrex.com/eaaci2006/.

For travel grants and more information, please visit www.congrex.com/eaaci2006.

 

See the Photo Album!

 

The XXV EAACI Congress will be CME Accredited

 

For more information click on the Congress Website: www.congrex.com/eaaci2006/

Report from XXVI EAACI Congress in Göteborg 2007

The XXVI Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, which took place from 9-13 June, 2007 in Göteborg, Sweden proved to be a highly successful meeting with more than 5,200 participants from 95 countries world wide. The Congress was very well covered by press, TV, and radio both internationally and in Sweden. The main theme was “Prevention and Treatment of Allergy and Asthma”, focusing on the exploration of asthma as an allergic disease along with the basic mechanisms, clinical care and consequences on health economics and the overall quality of life. However, all aspects of allergic disease, such as Urticaria, Rhinitis, Dermatological-, Food-, and Drug- allergy, as well as topics on inflammatory cells and mediators, functional genomics and proteomics and many more were covered by a great range of symposia, oral abstract sessions, postgraduate courses, poster discussion and “meet the experts” sessions.

The Congress started off with an exciting Opening Ceremony, taking place at the Goteborg Convention Center where all delegates had a taste of a pure Swedish evening including an amazing Abba Show and traditional food. The social program also involved a series of events, such as the Linnaeus expedition and the Archipelago evening, all together making everyone’s stay an enjoyable and unforgettable experience. Goteborg, situated on the verge of the North Sea, provided the ideal setting for a very fruitful scientific experience as well as for an exciting interaction among clinicians and basic researchers from all over the world.

All photos taken during the Congress are now available via the Congress Web Site www.congrex.com/eaaci2007 for you to download and print, free of charge for personal use.
1004Date: 7-11 June, 2008
Place: Barcelona, Spain

The European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology has the honor to announce the invitation to the XXVII EAACI Congress which will take place in Barcelona, Spain, 7-11 June 2008, under the main theme: Clinical Features of Allergy: From Pediatric to Geriatric. A specific Pediatric track will also be available during the whole Congress. 

All EAACI members are kindly invited to contribute to the scientific programme,by submiting proposals for suggested topics, symposia, speakers, etc. Any kind of contributions to make this Congress an outstanding event in terms of good science, collegiality andculture are also welcome.

Abstract submission deadline: now closed.

Registration
Deadline for late registration: now closed, 2008

For more information on the Congress please go to the official Congress website here.

422Allergy has been increasing all over the world. The "Western" world in particular has not only one of the heaviest burdens, but also the most demanding patients, frequently expecting to be completely cured with a 'magic' pill.

Contemporary medicine cannot, unfortunately, offer this. Resisting our fervent research efforts the cure for most allergic diseases remains unreachable. This is probably the main reason why a considerable number of patients seek relief in 'alternative' or complimentary treatments.

The fundamentally different approach to health and disease most such systems take, makes it difficult to objectively assess their effectiveness. In some occasions it may not even be about effectiveness at all !

Our responsibility as allergists is to ensure optimal treatment for our patients. If any approach works, or seems it could work we should certainly evaluate it and even endorse it! However, according to a recent poll, only a few of our members are convinced that there's any benefit in alternative medicine (table 1).

Actually, supporters were half of those considering these systems of little value or even a fraud! Still, the most popular vote was for the scientific approach: more studies are needed to verify or reject. In my view, this reflects the ethos of our Academy: it is a privilege of science to view novelty, even in radical form, without prejudice.

Nikos Papadopoulos

EAACI Website Editor

EAACI offers a number of Educational Grants each year to help members in financial difficulty to cover the cost of their yearly membership. The educational grant includes a subscription to the journals ''Allergy'' and "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology''. All Individual and Affiliate Members in EAACI who can motivate their application are welcome to apply for this grant.

2007 Educational Grant
Download the application form and send it
by post:
EAACI Executive Office
P O Box 24140
104 51 STOCKHOLM, Sweden
Visiting address: Karlavägen 108, elevator V, 8th floor.

by email: executive.office@eaaci.org

by fax:    +46 8 663 38 15
telephone +46 8 459 66 23

2007 Educational Grant Winners

Jan Gutermuth                          Germany
Jose Laerte Boechat                  Brazil
Alfredo Arias Cruz                      Mexico
Kateryna Gashynova                  Ukraine
Emilija Vlaski                             Rep. of Macedonia
Simona Eva Zitnik                      Slovenia
Jordan Minov                            Rep. of Macedonia
Loreta Bagdonaite                     Lithuania
Roksolyana Holovyn                   Ukraine
Nanneth Tiu                             Philippines
Valentina Cvejoska-Colakovska    Rep. of Macedonia|Ilija Kirovski                                   Rep. of Macedonia
Zhiyi Guo                                China
Nektaria Spanoudaki                 Greece
Paraya Assanasen                    Thailand
Jahja Zacharia                         Indonesia
Hartono Gunardi                       Indonesia
Zijadin Hasani                          Kosovo
Tiia Voor                                 Estonia

881MSc Allergy
The School of Medicine, University of Southampton

The School of Medicine at The University of Southampton has places available for students on the following MSc Allergy courses which are held at Southampton GeneralHospital.

2006 - Nasal Disease and Its Management
(Dr Peter Howarth)

Monday 9th & Tuesday 10th October 2006

a.m. Examination - Wednesday 11th October 2006

 

2006 - Introduction to Respiratory Disease
(Dr Peter Howarth)

p.m. Wednesday 11th & Thursday 12th October 2006

Friday 13th October 2006 & p.m. Examination

 

2007 - Mechanisms and Management (I) of Allergic Disease

Tuesday 16 January 2007

Wednesday 17 January 2007

Tuesday 27 February 2007

Wednesday 28 February 2007

Examination : Wednesday 28 March 2007

 

2007 - Dietetic Management of Allergic Disease

Tuesday 13 March 2007

Wednesday 14 March 2007

Case Presentations:

Tuesday 26 June 2007 & Wednesday 27 June 2007

 

2007 - Skin Disease and Its Management
(Prof Peter Friedmann)

12 & 13 June 2007

Exam : Monday 16 July 2007

 

2007 - Nasal Disease and Its Management
(Dr Peter Howarth)

Monday 8th & Tuesday 9th October 2007

a.m. Examination - Wednesday 10th October 2007

 

2007 - Introduction to Respiratory Disease
(Dr Peter Howarth)

p.m. Wednesday 10th & Thursday 11th October 2007

Friday 12th October 2007 & p.m. Examination

 

This programme aims to develop your interest in and knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms and management of allergic disease including the immunological basis, diagnostic testing, pharmaceutical preparations, management programmes and research techniques. The course is open to the wide range of people who require a basic understanding of allergic disease and who come into frequent contact with potential allergy sufferers e.g. doctors, nurses, midwives, health visitors, and school nurses. It is also suitable for specialist registrars and scientists who require a basic training in order to carry out research in allergy.

 

All modules can be taken alone or in combination with others as part of the MSc Allergy programme. A candidate for the MSc may also be a candidate for the subsidiary award of a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits).

For further information and an application form please contact:

Dr. Jill A Warner Tel: 44 (0)2380 796941
email jaw4@soton.ac.uk
Mrs. Brenda Colwell Tel: 44 (0)2380 796379
Email b.colwell@soton.ac.uk

Website:

http://www.soton.ac.uk/PostgraduateTaught/MedicineHealthandLifeSciences/Allergy/

 

http://www.som.soton.ac.uk/prospectus/postgrad/msc_allergy/default.asp

 

EAACI Accreditation Council
May 31st 2002

EAACI Accreditation Council Coordinating Secretariat has been operating for 12 months, since the first Accreditation of the Berlin European Congress, May 9th, 2001. Since that event a lot of effort has gone into effect, trying to develop a working strategy for CME and its diffusion among the affiliated Societies.

CME is an ever growing reality in Europe, and it's not by mere chance that we have begun alongside the very institution for CME, EACCME. EACCME is the UEMS` Accreditation Council, designed specifically to implement upon international recognition of educational events. In an imperfect society, represented by the various countries of the European Union, UEMS has designated EACCME as a clearing-house for those events that strive for international recognition and exchange of CME Credits in a reciprocity status. National Authorities, represented by the medical associations, are the governing national bodies that bestow and authorize Credits for educational events to the physicians attending them.

The need for transfer and acquisition of Credits by Doctors that take part in events around Europe, as well as in the USA, has bolstered the strengthening of EACCME in developing more Credit validation. In fact EACCME has started its operation in the year 2000, with only 15 events accredited. In 2001, we had already 102 events, and the current trend is expanding ever more, judging by the information received and by our own activity.

Even in our medical field we represent one of the higher entries, ranging around 10 % of the total, along with Oncology and Cardiology events. European Societies such as ours are playing an important and essential role in this growth, acting as an "umbrella" system that helps developing CME in various countries and national medical societies.
This fact is enhanced in those instances where we don't have a national Operating CME system, such as in Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, and until recently, in Italy.
In these case the European societies, among which stand out FECS (Cancer), EBAC (Cardiology), EBAP (Neurology), and naturally EAACI, act as authorities to accredit international events that couldn't otherwise distribute Credits to attending Physicians.

The system is working and spreading, forming a strong bond among national societies and a rich educational texture that works smoothly along the same guidelines and ethical pathways. We consider this mission inevitable and fulfilling the noblest purpose that stands at the base of the very
essence of the medical profession, represented by the quest for excellence and good practice in the interest of the patient.

A lot remains to be done, working on our strong points, and following suit with the weakest areas. This past year alone we have had the first accreditations ever, not only the Allergology and Clinical Immunology field, but in any event ever, in countries such as Hungary, Spain, Poland and Portugal.

Our friends and colleagues in those countries are grateful for the effort of developing CME there, promoting rapidly new opportunities for medical education, and its merging into the other systems. A lot is happening in Europe and in the rest of the world in this field, and the more advanced systems,
such as in the USA, U.K, and others, are leading the way for improved development.

Distance Learning, Continuing Professional Development, creation of Providers delegated to independently implement UEMS-EACCME operations in Europe, are all quests and goals that will be soon achieved, spreading worldwide.
The ever-growing need for a global focus on the reality of the medical profession is the engaging force behind this operation, and EAACI is surely playing a major role in it.

Dr. Alfonso Negri, CME Consultant,
EAACI Accreditation Council,
Coordinating Secretariat
Milan, May 31st, 2002
Continuing Medical Education, CME, as a moral and ethical tool, is the reason why every doctor has to adapt his knowledge and working experience to the ever-changing world of medical practice and the relationship with professional roles. A revolution in health care is occurring as a result of changes in the practice of medicine and the nature of modern society.These include changing demographics and the pattern of disease, with new technologies and innovations in health care delivery.

A new increase in consumerism, patient empowerment and authonomy, puts an emphasis on effectiveness and efficiency in changing medical awareness.
CME has proven itself a valuable tool to grasp and profit in the technological innovations provided by scientific research, applied to medical practice, translating into optimal care and
service for the patient. CME and medical economics represent a necessary bonding, with a natural tendency
to represent the basis for professional fees, career advancement and professional recertification.

Some countries in Europe have adopted a compulsory system, such as in Holland, UK and Italy, following the
U.S. example where you can have fiscal benefits thanks to your CME activity. Scientific Societies are called
to act as quality controllers of scientific contents in educational procedures. One way is to supply its own
members with a rich international events programme, controlled by UEMS. Another role is, in accordance
with EACCME, to function as an accreditating body for events held in countries that have not developed a
full system of CME.

EAACI will undoutedly have a major role in its Allergology and Clinical Immunology field, as in other proven experiences, such as Cancer, Cardiology, Respiratory, Nephrology, Neurology, etc.

The CME system has progressed from a prestigious factor to a moral necessity and an economic advantage, due to the possibility of financing the very same Societies through the accreditation of their events. After an initial investment in secretarial structures, the accreditation, certification and publishing fees of their events, can result in a very profitable result.

We have to bear in mind that, besides the classic residential
events, such as congresses, workshops, courses, etc.,UEMS is considering shortly the accreditation of distance learning events for CME credits (on-line, self-assessment publishing etc.) This will be needed to fulfill the needs of an ever growing demand for medical education, certified and controlled in its quality output.

Alfonso Negri March 18, 2002

In June 2000, following the AMA-UEMS 1998 letter of intent, the AMA Council on Medical Education has developed a Pilot Project for the recognition of CME credits authorized by EACCME ( European Accreditation Council for Continuing
Medical Education), for live events, based on a system of shared international standards.

UEMS is a Brussels-based organization composed of 17 National Associations from the European Union, with 37 specialist organizations, to act as clearing house in helping medical specialists in the Common Market develop uniform standards in medical education. The goal of the pilot Project has been to establish a system of International Credit, encouraging physicians from the US and Europe to collaborate and participate in international congresses. EACCME does not provide accreditation of CME activities directly, thus not superseding national Authorities on accreditation of CME, rather validating the event on the agreed quality criteria.

The AMA is notified of each internationally relevant event, and US State and Professional bodies have an agreement
with AMA to convert EACCME credits into AMA credits as well. On 14 June 2002, a joint AMA-UEMS council approved unanimously to extend the reciprocal recognition till 2006, with an interim report in 2004.

There is, also a firm commitment between UEMS/EAACME, the ACCME and AMA not only on the exchange of credits,
but also on the matter of quality policy. There is an ACCME-Canadian document, by and large consistent with UEMS policy, that allows for common ground in a reciprocal credit system. This could very well be the base for moving towards a system of universal recognition of " International Credits", issued by qualifying accreditation bodies worldwide. A quality assessment statement could be based on a scientific program with educational input, peer review, outcome measurements, quality requirements.

A further step proposed by the Joint AMA-UEMS Council, will be the organizing of a joint meeting of accrediting organizations in Europe, USA, Canada, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand, South-East Asia, in order to explore joint interest and possibilities for " International Credits". This meeting could possibly take place at the end of 2003. EAACI has been accrediting with EACCME about 18 events this year alone, in 8 different countries in Europe.

Physicians attending these events received UEMS/EACCME Credit Certificates, that can be tranferred to any other European System in CME, and American Physicians can receive immediate validation from AMA/ACCME, through AAAAI. This opens invaluable avenues both for American Doctors attending European events, as well as for European ones in the U.S., thanks to the automatic system started this year. This will continue in a very widespread fashion, as more events and countries will develop accreditation policies
through EAACI Accreditation Council, and could very well benefit Anerican Physicians, inviting them to attend European events.
Perhaps a more active advertising of this new system could benefit both sides, through exchange of programs and published calendars on respective websites.
*Open Forum on the Future of Networks of Excellence - Will the investment be lost?
Place:Royal Institute of Natural Science, rue Vautier 29, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium
Date:20 November 2007
Link:www.supportresearchnoes.eu

For more information click here!!

* The First North African Course on Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Place:Hammamet,Tynisia meeting
Date: 25-28 October 2007
Tel: +216 71 843 317
Fax: +216 71 791 833
For more information click here!!

* IX International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections  Sponsor: The Macrae Group
Date: 3 - 6 March 2007
Place: Mandarin Oriental, Excelsior Hotel,Causeway Bay, Hong Kong
Tel: (+1) 212.988.7732
E-mail: TheMacraeGroup@comcast.net
Link: www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* 2e Congress Francophone d' Allergologie - CFA 2007
Date: 11-13 April, 2007
Place: Palais des Congress - Porte Maillot, Paris - France
For more information please click on www.cfa2007.com

* 2007 World Immune Regulation Meeting
Main Theme: Special Focus on Regulatory Cells
Date: 11-15 April 2007
Place: Davos, Switzerland
For more information click on the website http://www.siaf.unizh.ch/WTM/Overview.html

*Ist International Allergooncology Symposium in Vienna,2007
Date: April 16  2007,
Place: Vienna, Austria
For more information click here!!

*Basic and Clinical Allergy Course 2007
Date: 16-19 April 2007
Place:London, UK
E-mail: k.dixon@imperial.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7351 8172 
For more information click here!!

*GA²LEN Annual Conference 2007
Date: 20 April 2007
Place: Imperial College London, UK
For more info click here!!

* V European Asthma Congress
Date: 21-24 April, 2007
Place: Moscow, Russia

* World Asthma Meeting
Date: 22-25 June 2007
Place: Istanbul, Turkey
For more information go to www.toraks.org.tr or email at edagli@superonline.com

* 2007 Joint Technical Symposium
Date: 28-30 June
Place: Toronto, Canada
For further details either visit:  www.jts2007.org
For information send mail to : info@jts2007.org
Tel: 323-463-1500

* The British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2007 Meeting
Date: Monday 2nd - 4th July 2007
Place: Burleigh Court International Conference Centre, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK
For further details either visit: www.bsaci.org or email: info@bsaci.org
Tel: +44 (0)207 404 0278

*Gaslini Advanced Course in Basic and Applied Immunology
Date: 9-13 July 2007
Place: Villa Quartara, Genoa (Italy)
For further details please visit www.sispge.com/immunology
Tel:+39 010 5636554 - 5636805  
Fax +39 010 3776590

* 25th International Congress of Pediatrics
Date: 25-30 August 2007
Place: Athens Congress Hall, Athens, Greece
For more information click on the website http://www.icp2007.gr/

* 17th ERS Annual Congress
Date: 15-19 September, 2007
Place: Stockholm, Sweden
For more information please visit www.ersnet.org

* 9th Baltic Summer School (BSS) course / workshop Inflammation :­ A Key to Common Complex Disease
Dates & place:
Theoretical course, 2nd - 13th September, 2007, Lund, Sweden &
Practical course, 17th - 21st September, 2007, Lund, Kiel and Copenhagen.
Additional information is available on the website: http://www.balticsummerschool.net

* 1st International Congress on Exacerbations of Airway Disease (ICEAD)
Sponsor: The Macrae Group
Date:  4-7 October 2007 
Place: Ritz-Carlton Hotel, San Juan, Puerto Rico
Tel: (+1) 212.988.7732
E-mail: TheMacraeGroup@comcast.net
Link:  <http://www.TheMacraeGroup.com> www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* Jordanian Society of Allergy & Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 10 October 2007 
Place: Amman, Jordania
E-mail: ababnehhani@yahoo.com

* Turkish National Society of Allergy & Clinical Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 16-20 October 2007 
Place: Antalya, Turkey
Contact: www.aid.org.tr
E-mail: okalayci@hacettepe.edu.tr

* Israel Association of Allergy & Clinical Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 18-20 October 2007 
Place: Afule, Israel
Contact: drwerner@012.net.il

* Portuguese Society of Allergology & Clinical Immunology October Meeting
Date: 18-20 October 2007 
Place: Estoril, Lisabon, Portugal
For more information: www.spaic.pt

* Congress of Slovak and Czech Allergists and Clinical Immunologists
Date: 24-27 October 2007 
Place: Trnava, Slovakia
For more information: www.csaki.cz

* Meeting of the Spanish Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date: 25-27 October 2007 
Place: Santander, Spain
For more information: www.seaic.es

* EAACI-IUIS-STI Course
Main Theme: 1st North African Course on Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Date: October 25th-28th, 2007
Place: Yasmine-Hammamet,  Tunis

*Cytokines in Health & Disease
Fifteenth Annual Conference of The International Cytokine Society
Date: October 26-30, 2007
Place: San FRancisco, California
For more information go to www.cytokines2007.org
Email: info@cytokines2007.org
Fax: 706-228-4685

* Meeting of the Finnish Society of Allergology & Immunology
Date: 14 November  2007
For more information: http://www.terveysportti.fi/kotisivut/sivut.koti?p_sivusto=435

* Meeting of the Norweigan Society of Allergology & Immunopathology
Date: 14 November  2007
Place: Oslo, Norway
For more information: www.legeforeningen.no

* Meeting of the Dutch Society of Allergology
Date: 17 November  2007
Place: Utrecht, Netherlands
For more information: www.nvva-allergologie.nl

* Ukrainian Society for Clinical Immunology and Allergology
Date: 19-21 November  2007
Place: Poltava, Ukraine
For more information: www.immunology-ua.org/ua

* Meeting of the Swedish Society for Allergy
Date: 29 November  2007
Place: Stockholm, Sweden
For more information: www.sffa.nu

* World Allergy Congress 2007
Date: 2-6 December 2007
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
For more information click on the website http://www.congrex.com/wac2007/

* Meeting of the Hungarian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Date: 3-6 December 2007
Place: Budapest, Hungary
For more information: www.makit.hu

* 12th Congress of the International Rhinologic Society
Date: 5-8 December 2007
Place: Venice, Italy
For more information click on the link www.irspinocchio2007.org
Contact Details:  MCA Events srl - via G. Pellizza da Volpedo 4, 20149 Milano, Italy,
Tel. +39 02 3493440
Fax +39 02 34934397
info@mcaevents.org

* Annual Meeting of the Austrian Society for Allergology and Immunology
Date: 13-15 December 2007
Place: Alpback in Tirol, Austria
For more information: www.oegai.org

* Virtually Informed: The Internet as (New) Health Information Source
Vienna Interdisciplinary Research Unit for the Study of (Techno)Science and Society VIRUSSS
Date: 25-26 January 2008
Place: Vienna, Austria
For more information email at sec.wissenschaftsforschung (at) univie.ac.atImpressum or go to http://www.univie.ac.at/virusss/rubrik/1002///.

* Joint symposium of the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain
Date: 30 January 2008
Place: Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, London
More information: http://www.rpsgb.org/worldofpharmacy/events/
Click here to download the brochure.

* Egyptian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (ESPAI)
6th International Congress
Date: 21-22 February 2008
Place: Cairo, Egypt

* 64th AAAAI Annual Meeting
Date:14-18 March 2008
Place: Philadelphia, PA, USA

* DGAKI Allergy Workshop
Date: 07 - 08 March 2008
Place: Mainz, Germany
More information: http://www.dgaki.de/

* World Immune Regulation Meeting 2008 - WIRM 2
Date: 17 - 20 March 2008
Place: Davos, Switzerland
Focus on Regulatory Cells and Th17 cells
Abstract submission prolonged until 8 December 2007
More information: http://www.wirm.ch/WTM/Overview.html

* Basic and Clinical Allergy
Date: 31 March - 03 April 2008
Place: London, UK
The programme covers current and emerging concepts as well as an overview of basic principles. To view the announcement for the meeting click here.
More information:http://www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/nhli/events

* GA²LEN Annual Conference, 10-12 April 2008, Paris, France
GA²LEN plenary session: 11 April 2008
GA²LEN Public Day - francophone: 12 April 2008
More information: www.ga2len.net - GA²LEN Office office@ga2len.net

* 2nd AllergoOncology Symposium
Date: 11-12 April 2008

Place: Lecture Halls of the Medical University Vienna

Level 7, Waehringer Guertel 18-20 1090 Vienna, Austria
Tel: +43 (0)1 40 400 – 5120
Click here to view the program!

For more info click here !!

* 3rd International Symposium on Molecular Allergology
The event is supported by the EAACI and promoted by the Interest Group on Allergy Diagnosis
Date: 18-20 April 2008
Place: Salzburg, Austria
For more information, pleaso go to http://www.isma2008.eu/ .

 

* Drug Allergy for Clinicians
Date: 1 May 2008
Place: Governors Hall, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
For more information, pleaso go to http://www.allergycourses.org or tel. +44 208 906 7778

* 11th EFA Conference Equality in Health for People with Allergy, Asthma COPD in Europe
Main theme: From prevention and self-management to better quality of life
Date: 30 May- 2 June 2008
Place: Sofia, Bulgaria
For more information go to EFA website, http://www.efanet.org/

* GA²LEN Symposium at the EAACI 2008 Congress
Date: 9 June 2008, 10:30 - 12:00, Barcelona, Spain

* 22nd Congress of the European Rhinology Society
27th International Symposium of Infection & Allergy of the Nose
Date: 15-19 June 2008
Place: Crete, Greece
For more information email at ers2008isian@frei.gr
or click on the website http://www.ers2008isian.com/

* ROYAN International Twin Congress
9th Congress of Reproductive Biomedicine - 4th Congress on Stem Cell Biology & Technology
Date: 27-29 August 2008
Place: Tehran, Iran
For more information please go to the website www.royaninstitute.org .

* 12th International Paul - Ehrlich Seminar
Regulatory Control and Standardization of Allergenic Extracts
Date: 24 - 27 September 2008
Place: Bad Homburg, Germany
For more information please go to the website www.pei.de/ipes2008 or download the seminar brochure.

* 2nd Gaslini Advanced Course in Basic and Applied Immunology
Date: 20-25 September 2008
Place: Villa Quartara, Badia della Castagna, Genoa, Italy
Registration deadline: 25 August 2008. Click here to download the Registration Form. Click here to download the Programme of the course.

* ERS Congress
Date: 04-08 October 2008
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information email at info@ersnet.org or visit the website http://dev.ersnet.org.

* 2nd Congress of the European Academy of Paediatrics
Date : 24-28 October 2008
Place: Nice
Congress Venue: Nice - Acropolis
Country Congress: France
Tel: +41 22 908 0488
Fax: +41 22 732 2850
For more info please visit the congress website http://www.kenes.com/paediatrics or contact the secretariat at paediatrics@kenes.com

* XIX World Congress of Asthma
Date: 05-09 November 2008
Place: Monte-Carlo, Monaco
For more information email at wca2008@publicreations.com
or click on the website www.aim-internationalgroup.com/2008/wca

* ERS-GA2LEN Research Seminar: Post Genome Respiratory Epidemiology II:
An interdisciplinary challenge
Date: 06-08 November 2008
Place: Cernay, France
For more information please visit www.ga2len.net

* 7th Symposium on Experimental Rhinology and Immunology of the Nose (SERIN)
Organised by the EAACI ENT Section.
Date: 13-15 November 2008
Place: Dubrovnik, Croatia
For more information please visit the official website www.hdorl.net/serin2008.

* EAACI-GA2LEN Allergy School
Theme: Epidemiology of Allergy and Respiratory diseases
Date: 25-28 November 2008
Place: London, United Kingdom
For more information click here.

* The 16th International Rhinology Update Course
Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital and in cooperation with The Free University of Brussels, Belgium
Date: 24-28 November 2008
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
For more information email at sispi@mahidol.ac.th .

* 3rd International Consensus Meeting on Urticaria
Date: 04-05 December 2008
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information please go to http://www.allergie-centrum-charite.de/index.php?id=1146.

* International Congress on Cytokines in Immune Regulation and Disease
Date: 04-06 December 2008
Place: Palazzo dei Congressi, Auditorium, Florence, Italy
To download the programme click here. For more information click on the website www.cytokines2008.com

Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG is committed to furthering excellence through research in

ALLERGY DIAGNOSIS • ALLERGY THERAPY • ALLERGY PREVENTION

980

The presentation of the 7th Award will be made in recognition of scientific achievement in the field of Allergology during the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Congress, Gothenburg 2007.

A submission for the award shall take the form of one full research paper published in an international peer reviewed journal in 2004/2006, together with a curriculum vitae.

Applicants must be members or affiliates of the EAACI, under the age of 40 years, and the research that is the subject of the application must have been conducted in a European centre. Special consideration will be given to research concerning the mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.

Submissions should be made before 31 December 2006
and addressed to:

EAACI Executive Office
Allergopharma Award
c/o Ms Ostrom
Karlavägen 108, elevator V, 8th floor
104 51 STOCKHOLM, Sweden

Further information can be obtained from:
Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG
21465 Reinbek, Germany
Phone: + 49 40 727 65 185
Fax: +49 727 65 318
Website: www.allergopharma.com
E-mail: oliver.cromwell@allergopharma.de

115Ioana Agache
Romania
Faculty of Medicine, Brasov
ibrumaru@unitbv.ro

Education
M.D. 1994, University Carol Davilla Bucarest
Specialist in Allergology and Clinical Immunology 1999

Lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine in Brasov in Clinical Immunology since 1996

Scientific area
Immunopathology of acute coronary syndromes and miocardium diseases, immunology of chamydial infection in atherosclerotic lesions, incidence and clinical profile of the antiphospholipid syndrome, clinical application of immunohistochemistry in an interdisciplinary approach, the value of immunofixation in defining monoclonal gammopathies
by Peter W. Hellings, JMA Representative ENT Section

In the beginning of April, the Advanced Sinus Surgery Course took place in the Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, organized by Prof. Wytske Fokkens, present head of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the AMC and chairman of the ENT Section of the EAACI.

This two-day course aimed at extending both the theoretical knowledge as well as practical skills of ENT surgeons beyond the boundaries of the sinonasal cavity. This first course was attended by 55 participants from 10 different countries. The teacher of honour was Professor Valerie Lund, London, U.K., authority in the field of sinus surgery and well-known for her contribution to sinonasal tumor surgery. The lectures by the board of teachers covered a wide range of topics, from image-guided surgical navigation and powered instrumentation, to mucocoeles, hypophysectomy, frontal sinus surgery, endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy, orbital decompression, sinonasal tumor surgery and handling of complications after sinus surgery.

During the course, participants were allowed to actively train their operative skills in endoscopic sinus surgery on cadaver heads. The facilities made available for each of the participants were high-standard, including whole skulls, CT scans of the skulls, own monitors and powered instruments (cfr. pictures). The dissection manual was especially designed for the course and guided the participants step-by-step through the different sinus surgery techniques with emphasis on helpful tips and highlighting pitfalls of sinus surgery.
As an ENT surgeon, I recommend this course to ENT surgeons with special interest in sinus surgery as most participants rated the quality of the course from very good to excellent. The next course will be held in April 2005.

347 346

Pic 1: Overview of training facility in the dissection room.
Pic 2: Professor Wytske Fokkens in discussion during the sinus surgery training session.

2006-2007 Board Members

President
Prof. Anthony J. Frew
Secretary General
Prof. Jan Lötvall
Past President
Prof. Ulrich Wahn
1:st Vice President
Prof. Roy Gerth van Wijk
Vienna President
Prof. Rudolf Valenta
Göteborg President
Prof. Jan Lötvall
Barcelona President
Prof. Ignacio J. Asotegui
Warsaw President
Prof. Marek L. Kowalski
SPC Coordinator
Prof. Cezmi Akdis
JMA Working Group Chair
Ulrike Raap
Asthma Secretary
Dr. Ioana Agache
ENT Secretary
Dr. Glenis Scadding
Paediatrics Secretary
Dr. Antonella Muraro
Immunology Secretary
Dr. Barbara Bohle
Dermatology Secretary
Prof. Torsten Zuberbier

2003-2005 Board Members

President
Prof. Ulrich Wahn
Secretary General
Prof. Anthony J Frew
Treasurer
Prof. Marek L. Kowalski
Past President
Prof. Paul van Cauwenberge
1:st Vice President
Prof. Jean Bousquet
Amsterdam President
Prof. Roy Gerth van Wijk
Munich President
Prof. Johannes Ring
Vienna President
Prof. Rudolf Valenta
Gothenburg President
Prof. Jan Lötvall
CME Co-ordinator
Dr. Sergio Romagnani
Asthma Secretary
Dr. Antonio M. Vignola +
ENT Secretary
Dr. Joaquim Mullol
Paediatrics Secretary
Dr. Maria A. Muraro
Immunology Secretary
Dr. Thilo Jakob
Dermatology Secretary
Dr. Thomas Bieber

* Pediatrics Meeting: The management of pediatric allergy: in whose hands? From bench to bedside
Date: 20th-21st January 2006
Place: Hotel Executive, Milan, Italy
In cooperation with ACAAI and EAACI.
For more information click on http://www.mcaevents.org or email at info@mcaevents.org. To download the programme click here.

* EAACI ENT Section Meeting
Date: 9-11 February, 2006
Place: Barcelona, Spain
For more information email at serin2006@pacifico-meetings.com or click on the website http://pacifico-meetings.com/serin2006.

* 4th EAACI-GA2LEN DAVOS  Meeting
Basic Immunology Research in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date:16-19 February 2006
Place: Eibsee-Hotel, Grainau, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany

* 1st International Symposium on Molecular Allergology Allergen Molecules: Basic and Clinical Aspects
Date: March 31 – April 1, 2006
Place: Rome, Italy
For more information click on www.allergome.org/meetings/rome.html

* GA2LEN Annual Conference
Date: March 29- April 1st, 2006
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information click on the website www.ga2len.net

* Training Course in Food Allergy
Date: April 8-11, 2006
Place: Middelfart, Denmark

* 2nd International Drug Hypersensitivity Meeting
Clinical Management, Basic Mechanisms, Genetics and latest research on Drug Hypersensitivity.
Date: 18-21 April, 2006
Place: Liverpool, England
For more information click on the website
http://pcwww.liv.ac.uk/drughypersensitivity/index.htm

* IV European Asthma Congress
Date: 22-25 April, 2006
Place: Tenerife, Canary Islands
For more information click on www.immunopathology.org

* 2006 EFA Conference
Date: 10-13 May, 2006
Place: Prague, Czech Republic
For more information click on the EFA website http://www.efanet.org

* IX International Congress of Polish Society of Allergology
Date: 10-13 May, 2006
Place: Wisla, Poland
For more information click on the website www.kongrespta.pl

* HB 2006  Buildings
Creating a healthy indoor environment for people
Date: 4-8 June 2006
Place: Lisboa, Portugal
For more information email at hb2006@fe.up.pt or click on the website www.hb2006.org

* ERS & ISIAN 2006
21st Congress of the European Rhinologic Society
25th International Symposium of Infection and Allergy of the Nose
Date: 11-15 June, 2006
Place: Tampere, Finland
For more information click on www.ers2006isian.com

* 2006 BSACI Annual Meeting
Date: 10-12 July, 2006
Place: Burleigh Court International Conference Centre, Loughborough, UK
For more information click on http://www.bsaci.org/annualmeeting.html

* XVIII World Congress of Asthma
Novel Concepts in Pathogenesis and therapy
Date: 15 -18 July, 2006
Place: Beaulieu, Lausanne, Switzerland
For more information click on www.worldasthma2006.ch

* 14th Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Date: 19-22 August, 2006
Place: Buenos Aires, Argentina
For more information email at latamcong@alergia.org.ar

* 16th ERS Annual Congress
Date: 2-6 September 2006
Place: Munich, Germany
For more information click visit www.ersnet.org.

*Symposium on Aging Research in Immunology: the Impact of Genomics (ARIG)
Date: September 4-5, 2006
Place: Coeur Defense Conference Center, Paris, France.
Student travel grants are available! For more infromation please visit www.arig.ac.at .

* ACAAI - HSACI Joint Allergy Symposium
Allergy update in Greece
Date: 6-9 September 2006
Place: Athens, Greece
For more information click on www.joint-allergy2006.gr

* 17th Annual Scientific Meeting 2006
Australian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy Inc.
Date: 7-10 September 006
Place: Manly Pacific Hotel, Manly Beach, Sydney, Australia
More information at education@allergy.org.au or at the website www.allergy.org.au (available in late 2005).

* III International Congress "Modern Methods of Diagnostics and Treatment of Allergy, Asthma and Immunodeficiency"
Date:24-27 September 2006
Place: Sheraton Metekhi Palace Hotel, Tbilisi, Georgia
More information at info@wipocis.org and iaaci@mail.ru.

* 5th Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group
Main topics:Mucosal innate immunity, microbiota and probiotics, inflammation, regulation of immune responses, mucosal vaccines
Date: 5-7 October 2006
Place: Prague, Czech Republic
For more information click on the website www.congressprague.cz/emig2006.

* EASL Monothematic Conference
Main theme: Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis
Date: 7-8 October 2006
Place: University Collegr London, London, UK
For more information click here. Download the Registration Form here.

* XVIII World Congress of Asthma Interasma
International Association of Asthmology
Date: 14-17 October 2006
Place: Hilton Hotel, Guadalajara, Mexico
More information at the website http://www.worldcongressofasthma2006.com/

Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG is committed to furthering excellence through research in

ALLERGY DIAGNOSIS • ALLERGY THERAPY • ALLERGY PREVENTION

680

The presentation of the sixth Award will be made in recognition of scientific achievement in the field of Allergology during the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Congress, Vienna 2006.

A submission for the award shall take the form of one full research paper published in an international peer reviewed journal in past years, together with a curriculum vitae. Applicants must be members or affiliates of the EAACI, under the age of 40 years, and the research that is the subject of the application must have been conducted in a European centre. Special consideration will be given to research concerning the mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.

 

Further information can be obtained from:
Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG
21465 Reinbek, Germany
Phone: + 49 40 727 65 185
Fax: +49 727 65 318
Website: www.allergopharma.com
E-mail: oliver.cromwell@allergopharma.de

Section on Pediatrics, EAACI

2006 – 2007 Annual Report

Members of the board

 

Luis Miguel Borrego, Junior Member Affiliate (JMA)

Philippe Eigenmann, Chairman of the Section

Frank Friedrichs, Member

Susanne Halken, Member

Gideon Lack, Member

Antonella Muraro, Secretary of the Section

Antonio Nieto, Member

Fabienne Rancé, Member

 

The Section on Pediatrics-EAACI has currently 867 members with voting rights.

 

During the last year, we continued to focus on our main activities, which are the following:

 

Post graduated education - continuous education in pediatric allergy for trained pediatric allergists as well as continuous education for primary care physicians - patient education - promotion of research - elaboration of guidelines for better care of children with allergies.

 

The Education and Training Committee in Pediatric Allergy (ETC-PA), has continued evaluation of pediatric allergists fulfilling the requirement outlined in the Training Syllabus for European Pediatric Allergists. In the last year, 96 colleagues from Spain received their diploma of Pediatric Allergists. In addition, 12 pediatric allergists from Switzerland have also fulfilled the requirements and were provided with their diploma. Currently, the curricula of colleagues from France, Portugal and Italy are evaluated. We strongly encourage pediatric allergists from other European countries to apply for their diploma. Application should be made through their national delegates. The list can be obtained from Jose Lopes Dos Santos, the Secretary of ETC-PA. In the near future, main training centers in various European countries will be evaluated and accredited.

 

In 2006, we had a very successful congress in Vienna, with several sessions devoted to Pediatric Allergy. In Goteborg, sessions of interest to pediatric allergist will be specifically labeled. At the 2008 EAACI Annual Congress in Barcelona, a complete pediatric track will be devoted to pediatric allergy, allowing pediatricians to have a large exposure to post-graduated courses and state-of-the-art sessions devoted to their specialty.

 

In 2006 and 2007, there were two PAPRICA sessions for primary care physicians. The first one took place in Macedonia and Albania and benefited from a great interest from specialists as well as primary care physicians from these countries. In April 2007, two sessions took place in the Netherlands, in Utrecht and in Groningen. There, the attendance was exclusively by primary care physicians who were most interested to have a direct exposure to pediatric allergy during their continuous educational program. An additional session is schedule in the autumn 2007, in Lithuania.

 

This autumn will also see a 2nd edition of the Food Allergy Training Course that we initially organized together with the Section on Dermatology and the Food Allergy Interest Group in 2006, in Denmark. This session will take place in Cork (Ireland). As there were many more applicants in 2006 than places available, we strongly encourage early application for the Cork training course.

 

Our Bi-Annual Common Meeting with the ERS Pediatric Chapter will take place in Estoril (Portugal), 20-23 October 2007. This will be a unique opportunity for pediatric allergist and pediatric pulmonologists to be exposed to the latest news in their specialty. It is most important for us to gather on a regular basis, and we strongly encourage the members of the Section to attend this meeting.

 

It took approximately two years to establish the new Pediatric Allergy Foundation, which is called “EAACI-Clemens von Pirquet Foundation”. This Foundation was established with the remaining assets from the former ESPACI. The Foundation is devoted to support Education and Research in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. As a first activity, the Foundation together with the Section and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) is organizing a Pediatric Allergy Immunology Research Brainstorming in order to define future directions for research in pediatric allergy and immunology. This meeting will take place prior to the Estoril meeting and proceedings should be published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

 

The Section has recently closed the work on the task force “Anaphylaxis in Children”. Their recommendations will be published in the June issue of Allergy and will be of great help to all practicing allergists. The Section plans to implement these guidelines as widely as possible. The Section has also launched a new task force “The Allergic Child in the School".

 

At the business meeting in Goteborg, new elections to the board will take place. I take this occasion to thank all current members for the friendly and nice atmosphere that allowed many projects to be fulfilled and to wish to the new board all the best for their work in supporting our specialty.

 

It has been a pleasure to work with you in the last 4 years, and thank you to all for your commitment.

 

 

 

 

Philippe Eigenmann

Chairman

Section on Pediatrics, EAACI

May 2007
EAACI Section on Pediatrics

Members of the board


Luis Miguel Borrego, Junior Member Affiliate (JMA)

Philippe Eigenmann, Chairman of the Section

Frank Friedrichs, Member

Susanne Halken, Member

Gideon Lack, Member

Antonella Muraro, Secretary of the Section

Antonio Nieto, Member

Fabienne Rancé, Member

 

The Section on Pediatrics-EAACI has 818 members with voting rights.

 

During the last year, we continued to focus on our main activities which are the following:

 

Post graduated education - continuous education in pediatric allergy for trained pediatric allergists as well as continuous education for primary care physicians - patient education - promotion of research - elaboration of guidelines for better care of children with allergies.

 

The section closely collaborates with the education and training committee in pediatric allergy (ETC-PA). ETC-PA is currently chaired by Arne Høst (Denmark) and coordinated by José Lopes Dos Santos (Portugal). ETC-PA started in 2004 to establish lists of individuals qualified to obtain the Certificate of European Pediatric Allergist. In 2005, ETC-PA has accredited Finish pediatric allergists, and the registration process of our Lithuanian colleagues will be finished by the time you read this report. Further countries, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Switzerland among others will start the review process soon. It's most important that as many pediatric allergists as possible will have the title of European pediatric allergist in the future. If your country has not started the registration process, I would encourage you to get in touch with your national representatives or your national pediatric allergy society as soon as possible.

 

2005 and early 2006 has seen four major events for continuous education in pediatric allergy. The annual EAACI 2005 Congress has been hold together with the World Allergy Congress in Munich in June. Several sessions have been devoted to pediatric allergy. Most of them have been visited by a large number of delegates. We expect this year’s meeting to be as successful.

In 2004, the section has launched the PAPRICA Program for continuous education of primary care physicians. The session of 2005 took place in Ukraine, and close to 150 participants enjoyed a full day program with state-of-the-art lectures. Delegates from the whole country enjoyed this unique opportunity to have in their country an international meeting in pediatric allergy. For the speakers it was a very enjoyable experience and it generated many interesting questions and personal contacts.

Last fall, the section had together with ERS-Pediatric Assembly a meeting in Prague. Besides top science, it was an important possibility for us to meet between pediatrician with a common interest in chest diseases and in allergy. It was decided that we should hold this meeting every other year. The next meeting will probably take place in Portugal Please bookmark this meeting in your agendas. in fall 2007.

In April 2006, the section on pediatrics together with the section on dermatology, and the food allergy interest group organized a food allergy training course in Denmark.Close to 100 delegates had the possibility to attend state-of-the art presentations as well as practical hands-on courses and interesting case presentations. Unfortunately, half of the applicants could not to be accepted to this course. We will definitely have to repeat it in a close future.

 

On "behalf" of the former ESPACI, the section launched a new foundation for promotion of education and research in pediatric allergy. After a written consultation of the section members, it was decided that the most suitable name for the Foundation would be "Clemens von Pirquet Foundation". The Foundation will start its activities with assets of over 200'000 Euros. The Foundation will work together in close collaboration with EAACI, and in particular the section on pediatric.

 

Finally, the section was also instrumental in two task forces. The Atopy Patch Test task force was initiated together with the Section on Dermatology. Its final report will be published this summer in Allergy. The task force on Anaphylaxis in Children is also close to the final conclusions and will publish it's recommendations this year. Please visit the sessions devoted to this topic during this year's annual meeting

 

 

Again, it would not have been possible to fulfill all achievements of this past year without the continuous work of the board member, the people involved in ETC-PA, as well as many other members and friends of the section. Thank you for your commitment.

 

With your continuous help, I look forward for a fruitful 2007.

 

 

 

Philippe Eigenmann

Chairman Section on Pediatrics, EAACI

May 2006

We hereby cordially invite all members of the Section on Pediatrics to join the:

Annual Business Meeting in Amsterdam
Monday June 14, 2004, 17:45 - 18:45
RAI Congress Centre Room P

The annual business meeting is a unique opportunity to have a yearly contact between the board and the members of the section. We warmly encourage you to come in order to actively contribute to future activities.

 

Padua, May 2004

Philippe Eigenmann
Chairman

Antonella Muraro
Secretary

We hereby cordially invite all members of the Section on Pediatrics to join the:

Section on Pediatrics Business Meeting
Education and Training in Pediatric Allergy
Monday, June 14 th, 16.00 - 17.30
Room P. RAI Congress Centre

 

 

Padua, June 2004

Philippe Eigenmann
Chairman

Antonella Muraro
Secretary

Minutes from the Section on Pediatrics Business Meeting
Amsterdam, Monday June 14, 2004, 17:45 - 19:00

 

1. Present:
Joanna Rijntjes, Andrea von Berg, Cristina Pascual, Bodo Niggemann, Fabienne Rancé, Magnus Wickman, Arne Host, Bulent Sekerel, Marzia Duse, Alessandro Fiocchi, Ed Van Leer, Zsolt Szepfalusi, Wolfan Rebien, Isidor Huttegger, Frank Friedrichs, Susanne Lau, Yolanda Meijer, Paola Miglioranzi, Tine K Hansen, Irina Sidorenko, Angela Gaspar, Luis Garcia-Marcos, Roger Rolland, Daniel Caillot, Roger Launer, Photini Sayonij-Papageorgor, Nikos Papadopoulos, Christian Moller, Marisdna Kuhar, Vesna Plevnik-Vodusek, Armando Di Fazio, Michele Rana, Liliane De Swert, José Lopes Do Santos, Philippe Eigenmann, Antonella Muraro.

Apologies:
Osmar Yusuf, Johanes Forster, Ernst Rietschel, Frans Timmerrmans, Stephan Strobel.

 

2. Commemoration of Herman Neijens

3. Report from the Chairman Philippe Eigenmann
Promotion of Education:
The education and training Committee on Pediatric Allergy ETC-PA chaired by Arne Host (Secretary José Lope Dos Santos) met on June 14, 2004 in Amsterdam. José Lope Do Santos, Section’s liaison officer in CESP, reported on the opportunity that the Section on Pediatrics has to start a provisional accreditation of the existing pediatric Allergists. This programme will begin on January 2005. Detailed instructions will be provided on the website soon. Accordingly, an accreditation of the Pediatric Allergy Centers in the European countries can commence including a visitation programme. Eastern pediatric allergists are encouraged to join the ETR-PA.

Within the Educational activity of the Section two other initiatives were activated. The first of these is PAPRICA symposia (acronymous for Pediatric Allergy for Primary Care Physicians) in collaboration with EAACI and Ga2LEN: the first symposia is scheduled for Ireland on Fall 2004. The next country involved in this activity will be Ukraine in Fall 2005. The second of these initiatives is the collaboration with WHO regarding the implementation of pediatric allergy in underdeveloped countries.

Early Diagnosis Campaign:
The Campaign started in June 2003 in Paris. At present 8 European countries are involved. The Business Office of EAACI coordinates the Campaign while the Section contributes to the Scientific part. Pharmacia will act as sponsor.

Some issues still need to be clarified. In Italy, the general pediatricians left out the pediatric allergists community in the project they had drawn for the Campaign. In Austria it appears that members of the Section were not chosen as EAACI representatives for the Campaign by the sponsor. A similar situation seems to have occurred in Belgium since EFA people started the Campaign with the patients without involving pediatric allergists and in particular Section members. It was decided to compose a list of the EAACI Section on Pediatrics representatives for each country to be sent to the EAACI Office in Brussels. This list should be distributed to Pharmacia and to EFA. The EAACI Section on Pediatrics representatives in each country will be the national representatives present in the ETC-PA Committee endorsed by their national allergy or pediatric allergy societies. Arne Host will provide an update of this list to Antonella Muraro.

Next meetings:
A meeting with the Section on Immunology is scheduled for February 3-6, 2005 in Davos. The meeting is devoted to young Scientists and members are encouraged to send fellows and residents.

A joint meeting with ERS Pediatric Assembly is scheduled from November 12-15, 2005. Information about the scientific programme and the deadline for the abstracts will soon be available on the website.


4. The cash report (Bodo Niggemann):
The Section on Pediatrics had some funds from the previous ESPACI. At present the budget has a positive balance and has been unanimously approved by the assembly.


5. Situation of ''Pediatr Allergy Immunol'' (Philippe Eigenmann)
The Board of the Section needs some feedback from the members regarding PAI. The attendants agreed that a pediatric allergy journal should continue to be published and that they prefer to receive PAI in hard copy in addition to the one available on-line. It was discussed whether or not other EAACI members should receive PAI in hard copy and it was proposed to use some of the Section’s funds to support this initiative. However this matter will be discussed with Blackwell as far as the costs are concerned.

6. Future activities (Philippe Eigenmann)
A collaboration with WHO was started. The aim is to provide guidelines for better diagnosis in pediatric allergy in underdeveloped countries.
A task force on Anaphylaxis in children, chaired by Antonella Muraro, will be constituted jointly with the Food Allergy Interest Group.


7. Next Business Meeting
The next Business meeting will be held at the EAACI Congress in Munich, June 26 – July 1, 2005.

 

 

Padua, June 2004


Philippe Eigenmann Antonella Muraro
Chairman Secretary

218A total of 24 presentations were offered over the two-days course, varying from dietary and environmental prevention to new therapeutic approaches and diagnoses of specific conditions. Whilst a detailed examination of each topic discussed would be impossible to relate in this forum, it was decided to highlight a number of the take home messages from the abstracts as a reminder to all of us of the specialized topics that comprise the multi-faceted and intervolving nature of Pediatric Allergy.

 

The sessions held on Friday 14 November produced insights ranging from allergy prevention at the prenatal stage to the problems involved in properly diagnosing food allergy. Opening with a discussion of the importance of the maternal environment and its impact on the immunological development of the child (C. Thornton), the morning sessions encompassed dietary and environmental prevention methods.

The dietary recommendations should be based on prospective randomised studies when possible (A. Høst). Based on an analysis of extant material some recommendations can be extrapolated for all infants: no special diet during pregnancy or for the lactating mother and exclusively breastfeeding for at least 4 months. Further recommendations can be suggested for high-risk infants: a documented hypoallergenic formula is recommended if supplement is needed during the first 4 months. As regards breastfeeding, randomisation is impossible and unethical, and for that reason recommendations on breastfeeding are based on prospective controlled non-randomised studies of high quality. Its role in prevention of allergic disease was confirmed in a recent metaanalysis published in Allergy.

As far as environmental recommendations are concerned, indications were provided against parental smoking and in favour of the avoidance of furry animals in families where in some members already have reactions (M. Wickman). It was pointed out that it is necessary to give practical advice to patients on allergen avoidance and to provide a rationale for such to increase adherence (A. Boner).

 

Moving into the realm of accurate diagnoses and testing, a presentation (P. Eigenmann) underscored the fact that a good knowledge of the mechanism of allergy is prerequisite for using allergy tests in clinical practice. Mosty IgE-related tests are extensivelly scientifically validated. Others might be used with care, by taking into account their sensitivity and specificity when defined. Notwithstanding all sophisticated diagnostic tests, clinical observation (e.g. by allergen challenge tests if necessary) remains the basis of allergy diagnosis.

Early allergic diagnosis (U. Wahn) is the essential prerequisite for correct measures of secondary prevention. Diagnostic tests combined with clinical history can only indicate possible clinical allergy and only elimination in combination with challenge tests can prove clinically significant allergy (S. Dreborg). In effect some clinically allergic children have non IgE to the causative allergen. At least some of these children have a cell-mediated allergic reaction. Allergy testing is furthermore most important before specific immunotherapy is prescribed (G. Hedlin).

A discussion of the mechanisms of food allergy asserted that food allergy is a malfunction of the gastrointestinal immune system to dietary antigens (K. Beyer). The majority of food allergic reactions are IgE-mediated. However even in non-IgE mediated food protein induced gastrointestinal disorders the duodenal presence of IgE-bearing cells has been shown suggesting a localized IgE mediated response. Though food-specific IgE is often present without clinical reactivity, the concentration of specific IgE correlates positiviely with the risk of reactions.

On the topic of clinical management of cross-reactivity (C. Pascual) it was indicated that this is a laboratory concept imported to the clinic and the meaning of cross reactivity varies for every group of allergens.

Regarding the pitfalls in food allergy diagnoses, sensitization is not the same as clinical allergy and elimination diets may only be provided on the basis of the individual proof of clinical relevance (B. Niggemann). The mainstay of food allergy management today remains the education of patients and their caregivers in appropriate food allergen avoidance techniques, early recognition of allergic symptoms, and early self-treatment of food allergic events (H. Sampson).

 

Atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) was the main topic of one of the sessions held on Saturday 15 November. It was imparted that in the “allergic” form of AEDS, patient symptoms may be exacerbated by a variety of food and airborne allergens (H. Sampson) and that food allergies play a role in one third of children with AEDS while diagnoses of this should be based on double-blind, placebo controlled food challenges (F. Rancé). The role of topical immunomodulators in AEDS was evaluated (T. Hoeger). In order to avoid serious side effects, use of TCS in children with AD should be restricted to class I and II (mild and moderate) steroids. Topical calcineurin antagonists (TCA) have been shown to be effective in children with AD. Pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have been licensed for use in children >2 years of age; recent studies have also demonstrated their efficacy in infants. Unlike TCS, TCA do not induce skin atrophy and might therefore be suitable for long-term therapy. Given their potent suppression of cytokine synthesis, there are a number of unresolved issues regarding their use in children. Until long term studies (extended to 5-10 years) are available, TCA should be regarded as useful and effective antiinflammatory agents supplementing, but not completely replacing topical steroid therapy. As a precautionary measure, regular use of sunscreens on UV-exposed areas treated with TCA should be strictly recommended.

In the session devoted to the role of allergy in the lung and the nose it was recognized that the exposure to allergens is an important factor in initiating and maintaining allergic airway inflammation in atopic asthmatics (SH. Arshad). Generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines causes amplification and persistence of the inflammatory process by cell recruitment and activation. Repeated exposure to low levels of allergen may result in persistent chronic inflammation. In addition there may be interaction between allergic and virus induced responses (RSV) that contribute to the development and/or persistence of inflammation.

Longitudinal studies have allowed the clearer definition of distinct wheezing phenotypes (G. Lack), as well as risk factors for the development thereof, it is hoped that the correct and early recognition of the asthmatic will allow for early environmental and therapeutic intervention.

The interplay between hay-fever and asthma was discussed (S. Halken), pointing out that allergic rhinitis and asthma often coexists. Effective treatment of allergic rhinitis may also improve coexistent asthma. SIT has the potential for preventing the development of asthma in children with hay-fever though, further studies will be necessary to determine whether early pharmaceutical treatment may prevent the progression from hay-fever to asthma.

 

Drug allergies are iatrogenic diseases and need a careful evaluation of the severity during the acute stage to advise the patient correctly. Distinct T cell functions can be associated with distinct clinical symptoms; cytoxic reaction are always involved in delayed reaction (W. Pichler). It is crucial to assess immediate reactions within a few months (A. Romano). The patient’s history continues to be crucial. In choosing diagnostic tests, it is important to distinguish between immediate and non-immediate reactions and to consider whether the clinical phase is acute or late (i.e., 3 to 4 weeks after recovery). Patch testing is useful, together with delayed-reading intradermal testing, in assessing non-immediate reactions, particularly maculopapular eruptions such as those occurring during anticonvulsant therapy. With regard to in vitro tests, determination of serum specific IgE levels (radioallergosorbent test or RAST and immunoenzymatic assay or ELISA) is the most common in vitro method for evaluating immediate reactions. In selected cases with negative allergologic tests, provocation tests could be useful. They are very sensitive, but should be performed in specialist centers with intensive care facilities, in the remission phase. Provocation tests can reduce the number of children falsely labelled as “drug allergic”.

The number of infections, the type and localisation of the infections and factors such as e.g. failure to thrive should be carefully considered in evaluating a child with recurrent infections (R. Lauener). For the differential diagnosis, consider primary immunodeficienceis, but also other diseases, such as e.g. secondary, acquired immune deficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis, ciliary dysfunctions.

The specific allergy treatments were discussed in the final session.

A review on specific immunotherapy was done by E.A. Cuesta.

Advise was given on how to manage an elimination diet with particular attention to nutritional adequacy (A. Muraro). Tips in instruction of patients and family were provided with regards to the “hidden ingredients”, food contamination as well as the evaluation of compliance.

The complexity and diversity of the allergic response can explain individual differences in the response to the treatments (A. Nieto). Strategies (agonistic or antagonistic) addressing specific factors of the allergic response are now available, or under advanced investigation. The identification of key factors in each patient, and the selective approach to them would suppose a safer and more effective control of allergic diseases.

a) Assignment of EAACI Congresses

The organisation of EAACI Congresses is assigned by the EAACI Executive Committee (ExCom) to a National Member Society of EAACI.

National Societies wishing to organise a Congress must apply in writing to the EAACI Secretary General not less than five years in advance. This letter should indicate the names of the President of the Congress and (if possible) some of the members of the Local Organising Committee (LOC).

Applicants will then be invited to make a formal oral presentation to the ExCom of their bid. This presentation should include a detailed and realistic description of the proposed Congress (venue, date, congress facilities, accommodation, transfers, financial plan, scientific programme overview etc.). In the event that a large number of bids are received, the board of officers may make an initial selection of candidates based on the feasibility of the bids.

The assignment of any EAACI Congress is regulated by a contract between EAACI and the LOC. The contract must be agreed and signed according to a timetable which is laid out by the Administrative Programme Committee (APC) and discussed at the time of the bidding process.

The LOC of the event proposes the place and date of the congress but these are subject to approval by the ExCom. The responsibilities of the LOC are laid out in Article 1(f). The LOC is aided and advised in its work by the EAACI Programme Committee (EPC).

b) Denomination, Venue, Languages

The denomination of the congress must be worded as follows: “European Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology”, followed by the relevant roman numeral.

On the letter-head paper, circulars and programmes, the official emblem of EAACI must be used with the exclusion of all others.

The host city should be easily accessible and have adequate hotel and transportation facilities.

The congress facilities should have a total minimum capacity of 5,000 participants. The main hall should accommodate at least 70% of the participants. In special cases this may be extended by internal video transmission, Two additional halls should accommodate at least 500 persons each.  In addition, 8 - 12 medium-sized to small-medium-sized rooms should be available for scientific sessions. Small rooms for committee meetings, secretariat and hospitality suites should be conveniently located.

An area for a commercial exhibition, allowing a minimum of 1,200m2 rentable space, should be available close to the congress facilities.

The official language of EAACI congresses will be English.

c)  EAACI Programme Committee

The EPC has the ultimate responsibility for the overall programme and consists of two parts: the Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) and the Administrative Programme Committee (APC). The SPC consists of the SPC Co-ordinator, President, Secretary General, 1st Vice President, Past President, the secretaries of the EAACI sections, and one representative (the Congress President or anyone named by him/her) of each of four consecutive EAACI congresses (the current year’s congress and the following three congresses). The Executive Manager is an adjunct member of the SPC. The SPC is chaired by the Secretary-General or their designated deputy. The work of the SPC is organised and coordinated by the SPC Co-ordinator, who is appointed by the Executive Committee. The SPC Co-ordinator is appointed for a term of two years, which may be preceded by a year acting as Assistant Co-ordinator, in order to learn the duties of the SPC Co-ordinator role.

The APC consists of the EAACI Treasurer, one ExCom representative, and the EAACI Executive Manager.

d) Professional Congress Organiser

The EAACI may appoint a Professional Congress Organiser (PCO) to organise EAACI Congresses.  Relationships between EAACI and PCOs are regulated by a contract approved by the ExCom. The PCO interacts with the APC and the LOC. The PCO provides the ExCom with six-monthly reports on the current status of the congress.

e) removed

f)  Local Organising Committee

The LOC is proposed by the National Member Society hosting an EAACI Congress. The LOC works in close collaboration with the SPC and PCO to help EAACI to organise its events and ensure the highest scientific and logistical standards.  The LOC accepts responsibility for all EAACI obligations in relation to organisation of the event deriving from the Constitution and By-laws, or from existing contracts and agreements (between EAACI and sponsors, publishing companies, etc.). The LOC is responsible for the preparation and realisation of:

1. Scientific aspects of the Congress

  • A scientific programme, proposed by the LOC to be
    approved by the SPC.
  • The receipt, selection and organisation of the 
    abstracts of posters and free communication
  • The editing and printing of an Abstract Book.

2. Social activities

  • The preparation of a social programme for delegates and accompanying persons, intended to stimulate personal contacts between the participants of the meeting. It should include one main social event open to all participants.
  • The organisation and financing of a Presidents’ Dinner.

3.Programmes and Publicity

  • The LOC is responsible for making the publicity necessary for the success of the Congress (information to various medical journals, national institutions, etc.) All major items of publicity material should be shown to the EAACI President and Secretary-General prior to printing (especially 1st & 2nd announcements).
  • An Invitation Programme (the Second Announcement) including Registration and Abstract forms, should be sent to all members of EAACI and to all members of EAACI National Member Societies, Affiliate Societies and co-operative Societies nine months before the congress.  The Invitation Programme should also include the main subjects to be discussed and, if possible, the names of the invited speakers as well as the main social activities.
  • The Final Programme is prepared by the LOC after approval by the EPC.  All programmes must be published in English.

4.  Other general aspects of the event

  • Covering the costs for travel, Business Class or equivalent, accommodation and registration of all elected and adjunct members of the ExCom, allowing them to participate in all business, scientific and social activities of the meeting.  In addition, registration and accommodation of ExCom accompanying persons should be covered.
  • Covering the costs for travel APEX or equivalent, accommodation and registration for all EAACI past-Presidents.
  • Providing, without any charge, adequate space and facilities including telecommunication facilities for the Secretariat of EAACI during the event.
  • Granting facilities free of charge for meetings of the ExCom, General Assembly, other committees and scientific bodies of EAACI, in so far as these have been requested beforehand, including an ExCom meeting on the day before the start of the congress.
  • Providing, without any charge, a hospitality suite or room for the EAACI President.
  • Offering at least 10 free registrations to persons nominated by the EAACI President.
  • Covering all costs (travel, Business Class or equivalent, accommodation, etc.) for the APC and for two representatives of the SPC at two planning meetings,  as well as the costs for participation of the EPC in the congress.
  • Consulting the EAACI President on all decisions which may influence the image of EAACI and the satisfaction of members attending the congress.

 

g) Finances

The financial relationship between the LOC and EAACI is defined by a special agreement.

The LOC receives from the EAACI Treasurer an initial support to be able to start the preparation of the event. Additional financial support should be raised by the LOC in the name of EAACI for the specific congress.

The overall budget and the registration fees are established by the LOC, but should be approved by the ExCom. Members and affiliates of EAACI (names will be provided by the Executive Office) should be entitled to a reduction of the registration fee (currently 20%). A percentage of all paid registration fees (currently 15%) should be transferred by the LOC to EAACI no later than three months after the congress.  This percentage is established by the ExCom prior to the signing of the contract for the congress.

* Workshop on Animal Models of Asthma
Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine (ITEM)
Date: 28-29 January, 2005
Place: Hannover, Germany
For more information contact Dr Armin Braun (braun@item.fraunhofer.de) or click on www.item.fraunhofer.de

*3rd EAACI Davos Meeting in Basic Immunology in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date: 3-6 February 2005
Place: Davos, Switzerland
For more information contact siaf@siaf.unizh.ch or click on www.siaf.unizh.ch/EAACI_meeting/EAACI_2004.html

* III World Congress on Immunopathology & Respiratory Allergy
Date: 5 - 8 February, 2005
Place: Pattaya, Thailand
Main themes: Allergy & Asthma, Autoimmune Diseases, Immunodeficiency and Basic Immunology, the Immune System Physiology
For more information click on www.isir.ru/thailand/general.html

* 3rd Annual Meeting of the Egyptian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (ESPAI)
Date: February 24-25, 2005
Place: Cairo Conrad Hotel, Cairo, Egypt
More information on the email congress@espai-eg.org or click on www.espai-eg.org/scientific.htm.

*  First International Congress on Immunodeficiency Disorders
Date: 28 February-2 March 2005
Place: Tehran, Iran
Main theme: Immunodeficiencies, Immunogenetics, Immunodiagnosis and Infections
For more information click on www.iaari.hbi.ir/icid.htm

* VII International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections
Date:  March 3 – 6, 2005
Place: Curacao Marriott Beach Resort, Curacao, The Dutch Antilles
Keydates:  December 15, 2004 – Early registration fee
January 5, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts due
January 5, 2005 – All abstracts due
For the program, registration and more information click on www.themacraegroup.com

* Frontiers in Neonatal & Infant Immunity
Date: March 18-20, 2005
Place: Westin Palace, Madrid Spain
Keydates:  January 10, 2005 – Early registration fee
January 10, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts due
January 10, 2005 – All abstracts due
February 10, 2005 – Hotel reservation deadline for group rate
The event is CME Accredited.
For the program, registration and more information click on www.themacraegroup.com.

* 61st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI)
Date: March 18-23, 2005
Place: San Antonio, Texas, USA
More information on: www.aaaai.org

* GA2LEN Annual Conference
Date: 18-19 April, 2005
Place: Ghent, Belgium
More information at the website: www.ga2len.net

* 1st Baltic Allergy Congress
Lithuanian Society of Allergollogy & Clinical Immunology
Date: 24-25 May, 2005
Place: Vilnius, Lihtuania
Main Theme: "Allergy: From the Past to the Future"
More information on www.balticconference.com/bac2005

* 10th EFA Conference
Allergy, asthma and COPD - Breaking through barriers.
Device: start with possibilities instead of limitations
Date: 2-4 June, 2005
Venue: Mitland Hotel, Utrecht, the Netherlands
More information at www.efanet.org.

*  ERS/ATS joint course on Basics in asthma
Date: June 8-10, 2005 
Place: Oslo, Norway
For more information click on www.ersnet.org

*The 10th Annual Meeting of the Global Alliance for Medical Education
Date:June 19-21, 2005
Place: The Westin New York at Times Square
New York, NY
For Registration information contact Meghan Arnott
at marnott@medicallectures.com or click on the GAME website www.game-cme.org

* XVIII IFOS World Congress
International Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies
Date: 25 - 30 June, 2005
Place: Rome, Italy
For more information email to ifos2005@gruppotriumph.it

* XIX World Allergy Congress
Organised by World Allergy Organisation (WAO) and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)
Date: 26 June - 1st July, 2005
Place: Munich, Germany
Main Theme: Allergy in a Changing World
For more information click on www.congrex.com/wac2005 or contact wac2005@congrex.se .

* RSV 2005 Symposium
Date: September 15 – 18, 2005
Place: Keble College, Oxford, UK
Keydates:  May 9, 2005 – Early registration fee
May 9, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts
May 9, 2005 – All abstracts due
July 25, 2005 – Late Breaker abstract deadline
September 5, 2005 – Final registration deadline
For the program, registration and more information click on  www.themacraegroup.com

* 4th Balkan Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Date: September 22-25, 2005
Place: Patriarchy Palace, Bucharest, Romania
For more information click on http://www.sraic.ro/congress/congress_en.html

* 2nd Croatian-Italian Symposium on Psoriasis
Date: 23-24 September 2005
Place: Naftalan, Ivanic Grad, Croatia
For more information email at naftalan@zg.htnet.hr or click on www.naftalan.nr

* VVM 2005, Viral Vaccine Meeting
Date: October 27 – 30, 2005
Place: Westin Palace, Madrid, Spain
For more information click on www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* International Cytokine Society Conference 2005
Cytokines, Immunity, Immunotherapy and Vaccine
Date: 27-31 October, 2005
Place: Lotte Hotel Jmasin, Seoul, Korea
More information at www.ics2005.org

* Joint Meeting of the Pediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the EAACI Section on Pediatrics
Date: November 12-15, 2005
Place: Prague, Chech Republic
More information on www.ers-eaaci2005.ch

*  Iranian Asthma Meeting - Biennial Seminar of Iranian Society of Asthma & Allergy (ISAA)
Date: 14-16 November 2005
Place: Tehran, Iran

* Superantigens in Airway Diseases Symposium
Immunology and clinics of superantigen-driven inflammation
Date: November 25-26, 2005
Place: Hotel Novotel, Ghent, Belgium
More information on www.semico.be/superantigens2005/

* European Patient Conferece on Stem Cell Research: The Patient's Perpsective
Date: 15-16 December 2005
Place: The Charlemagne Building, Brussels, Belgium
More information on the website www.erastepps2005.eu.com/index.htm

* EAACI Immunology Section and SIAF Symposium
Place: Davos, Switzerland
Date: 9th January 2004
Main Theme: Immune Mechanisms of Allergy

* Allergy and Eczema
A CME Accreditation Event in cooperation with ACAAI in Milan, 23rd - 24th January, 2004.
Main theme: Adverse reactions to food proteins, the changing patterns, the mechanisms and the teatment.
For further Information click on the website
www.mcaevents.org

* 4th World Asthma Meeting
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
Date: 16th -19th February 2004
Main theme: Asthma: A World-Wide Approach to Understanding, Treatment and Prevention
For more information click on the website www.WAM2004.com

* International Primary Care Respiratory Group - 2nd World Conference
Place: Melbourne, Australia
Date: 19th - 22nd February 2004
For more information click on the website
www.theipcrg.org

* 6th International Congress of Pediatric Pulmonology
Place: Lisbon Congress Centre, Portugal
Date: February 28th - March 2nd 2004
For more information on the Congress and the programme click on the website: www.cipp-meeting.com/CIPP6/

* 9th International Symposium on Immunological, Chemical and Clinical Problems of Food Allergy
Place: Budapest, Hungary
Date: 18th - 21st April 2004
Details of preliminary programme, abstract submission, exhibition, registration procedures and accommodations available at the website: www.foodallergy.makit.hu

* Basic and Clinical Allergy
18th course in the series
Place: London
Date: 19th - 22nd April, 2004
For further information click on the website: www.med.ic.ac.uk/divisions/49a/mtgs.htm

* 1st Drug Hypersensitivity Meeting
Place: Bellevue Palace, Bern, Switzerland
Date:  5th - 8th May, 2004
For more information click on the website
www.drughypersensitivity.ch

*  9th EFA Conference
Place: Oslo, Norway
Date: 24-26 June, 2004
Main Theme: Asthma and COPD:The Patient's Perspective
For more information click on www.efanet.org or contact hk.be@lhl.no

* Krakow Conference
Place: Krakow, Polland
Date: July 31st - August 3rd, 2004
Theme: Present and Future Developments on Allergy & Immunology
For more information click on the website www.pta.med.pl/krakow2004/index.php

* ERS Annual Congres
Place: Glasgow, U.K
Date: 4-8 September 2004
For more information click on www.ersnet.org or contact info@ersnet.org.

* Allergy Congress 2004
Place: Aachen, Germany
Date: 15th-19 September, 2004
For more information click on www.allergie-kongress-2004.de/.

* 2nd International Consesus on Urticaria
Place: Berlin, Germany
Date:1-2 October 2004
Main theme: Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, Quality of Life, Diagnosis and Treatment
For more information click on www.ecarf.org.

* XII. Turkish National Congress of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Place: Antalya, Turkey
Date:  6th - 10th October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.allerji.kongresi.info

* Annual Conference of the Romanian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Place: Brasov, Romania
Date:  7th - 9th October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.rsaci.3x.ro

* 3rd Slovenian Congress of Pneumology and Allergology
2nd Slovenian Immunology Congress-Immunology and Clinics IV:1st Slovenian Congress of Respiratory Nursing
Place: PORTORO, SLOVENIA, Grand hotel Emona
Date:  20th - 22nd October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.klinika-golnik.si

*American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
Annual Meeting
Date: 12-17 November 2004
Place: Boston, USA
For more information contact diannekubis@acaai.org or click on the website www.acaai.org/annual.html.

* Interasma - EAACI Asthma Section Joint Meeting
Date: 27 - 30 November 2004
Place: Bilbao, Spain
Main Theme: Asthma and Rhinitis: from guidelines to patient´s care
For more information click on www.interasma.org/bilbao2004

*Recent Advances in Asthma
Turkish Thoracic Society
Date: 2 - 4 December 2004
Place: Istanbul, Turkey
For more information click on www.toraks.org.tr

* XVII World Asthma Congress
Place: St. Petersburg, Russia
Date: July 5-8,2003
Main theme
Asthma: From Genes to Clinical Management

* World Allergy Organisation Congress-IXVIII ICACI
Place: Vancouver, Canada
Date: 7-12 September, 2003
For more information click on the website www.worldallergy.org

*III Balcan Congress of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
XI.Turkish Congress of National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Place: Istanbul
Date: 11-14 October 2003
For more information click on the website www.tnsaci.org

* EAACI Section on Pediatrics Symposium
Main theme: ''Advances in Pediatric Allergy''
Date: 14-15 November 2003
Place: Gevena Switzerland
For more information click on the website
www.sp-eaaci2003.ch

* EAACI and Section ENT Meeting
An event of Allergy Week in Ghent 2003
Place: Ghent, Belgium
Date: 15-18 November 2003
For more information click on the website www.semico.org
* Open Forum on the Future of Networks of Excellence - Will the investment be lost?
Place:Royal Institute of Natural Science, rue Vautier 29, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium
Date:20 November 2007
Link:www.supportresearchnoes.eu

For more information click here!!

The First North African Course on Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Place:Hammamet,Tynisia meeting
Date: 25-28 October 2007
Tel: +216 71 843 317
Fax: +216 71 791 833
For more information click here!!

* IX International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections  Sponsor: The Macrae Group
Date: 3 - 6 March 2007
Place: Mandarin Oriental, Excelsior Hotel,Causeway Bay, Hong Kong
Tel: (+1) 212.988.7732
E-mail: TheMacraeGroup@comcast.net
Link: www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* 2e Congress Francophone d' Allergologie - CFA 2007
Date: 11-13 April, 2007
Place: Palais des Congress - Porte Maillot, Paris - France
For more information please click on www.cfa2007.com

* 2007 World Immune Regulation Meeting
Main Theme: Special Focus on Regulatory Cells
Date: 11-15 April 2007
Place: Davos, Switzerland
For more information click on the website http://www.siaf.unizh.ch/WTM/Overview.html

* Ist International Allergooncology Symposium in Vienna, 2007
Date: April 16  2007,
Place: Vienna, Austria
For more information click here!!

* Basic and Clinical Allergy Course 2007
Date: 16-19 April 2007
Place:London, UK
E-mail: k.dixon@imperial.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7351 8172 
For more information click here!!

* GA²LEN Annual Conference 2007
Date: 20 April 2007
Place: Imperial College London, UK
For more info click here!!

* V European Asthma Congress
Date: 21-24 April, 2007
Place: Moscow, Russia

* World Asthma Meeting
Date: 22-25 June 2007
Place: Istanbul, Turkey
For more information go to www.toraks.org.tr or email at edagli@superonline.com

* 2007 Joint Technical Symposium
Date: 28-30 June
Place: Toronto, Canada
For further details either visit:  www.jts2007.org
For information send mail to : info@jts2007.org
Tel: 323-463-1500

* The British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2007 Meeting
Date: Monday 2nd - 4th July 2007
Place: Burleigh Court International Conference Centre, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK
For further details either visit: www.bsaci.org or email: info@bsaci.org
Tel: +44 (0)207 404 0278

* Gaslini Advanced Course in Basic and Applied Immunology
Date: 9-13 July 2007
Place: Villa Quartara, Genoa (Italy)
For further details please visit www.sispge.com/immunology
Tel:+39 010 5636554 - 5636805  
Fax +39 010 3776590

* 25th International Congress of Pediatrics
Date: 25-30 August 2007
Place: Athens Congress Hall, Athens, Greece
For more information click on the website http://www.icp2007.gr/

* 17th ERS Annual Congress
Date: 15-19 September, 2007
Place: Stockholm, Sweden
For more information please visit www.ersnet.org

* 9th Baltic Summer School (BSS) course / workshop Inflammation :­ A Key to Common Complex Disease
Dates & place:
Theoretical course, 2nd - 13th September, 2007, Lund, Sweden &
Practical course, 17th - 21st September, 2007, Lund, Kiel and Copenhagen.
Additional information is available on the website: http://www.balticsummerschool.net

* 1st International Congress on Exacerbations of Airway Disease (ICEAD)
Sponsor: The Macrae Group
Date:  4-7 October 2007 
Place: Ritz-Carlton Hotel, San Juan, Puerto Rico
Tel: (+1) 212.988.7732
E-mail: TheMacraeGroup@comcast.net
Link:  <http://www.TheMacraeGroup.com> www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* Jordanian Society of Allergy & Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 10 October 2007 
Place: Amman, Jordania
E-mail: ababnehhani@yahoo.com

* Turkish National Society of Allergy & Clinical Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 16-20 October 2007 
Place: Antalya, Turkey
Contact: www.aid.org.tr
E-mail: okalayci@hacettepe.edu.tr

* Israel Association of Allergy & Clinical Immunology Annual Meeting
Date: 18-20 October 2007 
Place: Afule, Israel
Contact: drwerner@012.net.il

* Portuguese Society of Allergology & Clinical Immunology October Meeting
Date: 18-20 October 2007 
Place: Estoril, Lisabon, Portugal
For more information: www.spaic.pt

Congress of Slovak and Czech Allergists and Clinical Immunologists
Date: 24-27 October 2007 
Place: Trnava, Slovakia
For more information: www.csaki.cz

Meeting of the Spanish Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date: 25-27 October 2007 
Place: Santander, Spain
For more information: www.seaic.es

* EAACI-IUIS-STI Course
Main Theme: 1st North African Course on Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Date: October 25th-28th, 2007
Place: Yasmine-Hammamet,  Tunis

* Cytokines in Health & Disease
Fifteenth Annual Conference of The International Cytokine Society
Date: October 26-30, 2007
Place: San FRancisco, California
For more information go to www.cytokines2007.org
Email: info@cytokines2007.org
Fax: 706-228-4685

* Meeting of the Finnish Society of Allergology & Immunology
Date: 14 November  2007
For more information: http://www.terveysportti.fi/kotisivut/sivut.koti?p_sivusto=435

* Meeting of the Norweigan Society of Allergology & Immunopathology
Date: 14 November  2007
Place: Oslo, Norway
For more information: www.legeforeningen.no

* Meeting of the Dutch Society of Allergology
Date: 17 November  2007
Place: Utrecht, Netherlands
For more information: www.nvva-allergologie.nl

* Ukrainian Society for Clinical Immunology and Allergology
Date: 19-21 November  2007
Place: Poltava, Ukraine
For more information: www.immunology-ua.org/ua

* Meeting of the Swedish Society for Allergy
Date: 29 November  2007
Place: Stockholm, Sweden
For more information: www.sffa.nu

* World Allergy Congress 2007
Date: 2-6 December 2007
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
For more information click on the website http://www.congrex.com/wac2007/

* Meeting of the Hungarian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Date: 3-6 December 2007
Place: Budapest, Hungary
For more information: www.makit.hu

* 12th Congress of the International Rhinologic Society
Date: 5-8 December 2007
Place: Venice, Italy
For more information click on the link www.irspinocchio2007.org
Contact Details:  MCA Events srl - via G. Pellizza da Volpedo 4, 20149 Milano, Italy,
Tel. +39 02 3493440
Fax +39 02 34934397
info@mcaevents.org

Annual Meeting of the Austrian Society for Allergology and Immunology
Date: 13-15 December 2007
Place: Alpback in Tirol, Austria
For more information: www.oegai.org

1007Date: 20-23 October 2007
Place:Estoril-Lisbon, Portugal

First Announcement

2007 EAACI - ERS Pediatrics Joint Meeting will take place between 20-23 October in Estoril Convention Centre, Lisbon, Portugal. The main theme will be "New Challenges from Childhood to Adolescence" aiming at the respiratory diseases and allergy as chronic conditions in young children and stressing the need for improvement of knowledge, as well as clinical and research collaboration.

Dates to Remember
January 2007: Second Announcement and Call for Abstracts��
April 2007: Deadline for Abstract Submission �
June 2007: Deadline for Early Registration��

Click here to download the relevant brochure .

1005

Open calls for JMA Working Group

Dear JMA,

We are happy to announce great news for you all: We offer two new open positions within our group, the JMA WG, so this may represent your chance to get involved in the JMA activities !

If you are willing to overtake this challenging job, we would very much appreciate your letter of intention and CV sent in before September 10th 2006.

In the last years the JMA working group has actively participated in EAACI activities and has achieved considerable benefits for the JMA, including free registration, travel grants, poster prizes, Junior sessions etc. The JMA working group consists of the Chairperson, 5 section representatives and the webmaster, and is elected every 2 years following the periodicity of the Executive Committee.

The present JMA working group was elected in Munich (2005) and following the JMA procedures the current JMA chairperson (Ulrike Raap) will forward her position to Miguel Borrego in Gotheborg 2007 who had been elected as the following chairperson in Vienna 2006. Furthermore, Peter Hellings will leave the JMA working group after Göteborg 2007 since he is at the age limit of 35 years by then.

The responsibilities of JMA representatives
To provide information to JMAs regarding activities and to liaise with the relevant section board, the JMA group and all the JMAs in the section, in order to promote participation in EAACI activities. The main forum for meeting and discussing among JMAs is the yearly JMA Business Meeting held at the occasion of the EAACI Congress, where the JMA Working group should give a full report of activities. The JMA group organises a Poster session, an Educational Session, a Forum and Workshops during the EAACI yearly Congress. The JMA Working group is also responsible for developing contacts with similar groups in other organisations, such as the Fellows in Training (FITs) in the AAAAI.

Voting procedures

• The Working Group is elected every 2 years, following the periodicity of the Executive Committee.

• Available JMA representative posts are open for re-election for any JMA given that the person is graduated MD or BSc and under 35 years at the time of election, is an inhabitant of a European country, is a member of the section to which he/she is applying and is prepared and able to come to the EAACI Annual Congress and other JMA meetings. The same JMA representative post can be held for a maximum of 2 periods (4 years).

• The JMA Chairperson must have held one of the other positions in the Working group for at least one period before being elected by the JMA Working group. The JMA Chairperson that leaves the position to the newly elected JMA chairperson will stay in contact with the group as a consultant.

• Interested candidates should send a CV and a short description of their work intentions (±500 words) to the group to the EAACI Executive Office before the given deadline. The working group will select up to 3 candidates/post based on keeping a well balanced group (gender, nationality etc.) The list will be presented, together with the candidates’ CV and summary, on the JMA Website and voting will be made by e-mail. The voting is open to all JMAs of the EAACI. The new JMA Working group starts after the results of the election have been presented at the JMA Business Meeting.

Interested?

Please send your e-mail, with a CV and a short description of yourself and your interest for EAACI activities (<500 words), to the EAACI Executive Office at executive.office@eaaci.org .

Please indicate whether your interest is for the Pediatric or the ENT JMA representative position. The deadline for submission is September 10th 2006.

We are looking forward to receiving your responses and will contact the nominated JMA by e-mail.

Good luck and kind regards,

The current JMA working group:

- JMA chairperson: Ulrike Raap
- Asthma section representative: David Groneberg
- ENT section representative: Peter Hellings
- Dermatology section representative: Elena Borzova
- Immunology section representative:Marcin Kurowski
- Paediatric section representative: Miguel Borrego
- Webmaster: Chrysanthi Skevaki

726EAACI and the Local Organising Committee offer 100 travel grants for the XXV EAACI Congress in Vienna, 10-14 June 2006. Junior Members and Affiliate Junior Members can apply with an accepted abstract.

Those who are awarded a travel grant will receive free registration to the Congress, shared accommodation in a twin-bedded room (up to 4 nights) and travel costs refunded up to EUR 500.

 

Travel costs will be refunded on site at the Congress, upon presentation of your original ticket and travel receipts. The travel grant application should be made in connection with the electronical abstract submission. Please note that to apply properly you need to fill in the following, otherwise your Travel Grant application will not be considered:

 

- That you wish to apply for the Travel Grant (tick the box)

- Date of birth (Only juniors up to 35 years can apply)

- EAACI membership number (You must be a Junior Members or Affiliate Junior Member to apply)

 

 

 

For more information, please visit the Congress website www.congrex.com/eaaci2006/index.html

The winners of the 2006 EAACI Educational Grant were announced during the XXV EAACI Congress in Vienna, 2006.

 

Recipient

Country

Wong, Edmund

Philippines

Gulbahar, Okan

Turkey

Sporcic, Zorica

Serbia & Montenegro

Glück, Joanna

Poland

Kouhkan, Azam

Iran

Noleva, Katya

Bulgaria

Vlaski, Emilija

FYROM

Raukas-Kivioja, Aet

Estonia

Pumputiene, Ingrida

Lithuania

Jakovska-Maretti, Tatjana

FYROM

Minov, Jordan

FYROM

Schober, Wolfgang

Germany

Novakova, Sylvia

Bulgaria

Hansen, Anker

Denmark

Stavric, Katarina

FYROM

Bakalova, Rossitza

Bulgaria

Gerstmayr, Marianne

Austria

Keskin Göksel, Ozlem

Turkey

Nanou, Anna

Greece

Voor, Tiia

Estonia

Zvoristeanu, Anca

Romania

Holovyn, Roksolyana

Ukraine

Huss-Marp, Johannes

Germany

Kirovski, Ilija

FYROM

Kamchaisatian, Wasu

Thailand

Uguz, Aysen

Turkey

Arias Cruz, Alfredo

Mexico

Sonomjamts, Munhbayarlah

Mongolia

Sun, Baoqin

China

2001
Professor Cezmi A. AKDIS, MD, SIAF, Davos, Switzerland.
A molecular basis for T cell suppression by IL-10: CD28- associated IL-10 receptor inhibits CD28 tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase binding. FASEB J. 2000; 14:1666-1668.

2002
Dr. Susanne VRTALA, AKH, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Genetic engineering of a hypoallergenic trimer of the major birch pollen allergen.
Bet v 1. FASEB J. 2001, 15:2045-2047.

2003
Dr. Peter W. HELLINGS, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium.
Blockade of CTLA-4 enhances allergic sensitization and eosinophilic airway inflammation in genetically predisposed mice. Eur. J. Immunol 2002, 32:585-594.

2004
Professor Eckard H. HAMELMANN, MD, Humboldt-University Berlin, Berlin, Germany. Exposure to endotoxin and allergen in early life and its effect on allergen sensitization in mice. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2003;112:389-396. and

Dr. Eleanor LING, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London, UK.
CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell suppression of allergen-driven T cell activation is related to atopic status and expression of allergic disease. The Lancet 2004, 363/9409:608-615.

2005
Univ.Doz. Dr. Barbara BOHLE, AKH, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
A novel approach in specific allergy treatment: The recombinant fusion protein of a bacterial cell surface (S-Layer) protein and the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 (rSbsC-Bet v 1) combines reduced allergenicity with immunomodulating capacity.The Journal of Immunology 2004;172:6642-48. and

Dr. Hamida HAMMAD, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Essential role of lung plasmacytoid dendritic cells in preventing asthmatic reactions to harmless inhaled antigen. J. Exp. Med. 2004; 200: 89-98.

Anne Casset from France with her project “Characterization of new mite allergens”. Her host is Prof. Rudolf Valenta, Center of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria

 

Monica Vilhelmsson from Sweden with her project “The role of cross-reactivity between Mala s 11 and human MnSOD in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema”. Her host is Prof. Reto Crameri, Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research., Davos, Switzerland.

 

Q. Thai Dinh from Germany for his project “Allergy and environmental changes: Associate between ozone exposure and neuronal mechanisms in a mouse model of asthma.“. His host is Prof. K. Fan Chung, Thoracic Medicine Dept. Imperial College, London, United Kingdom


Natalija Polovic from Serbia for her project “Design of a new chimeric protein for application in specific immunotherapy of allergy to cat.”  Her host is Prof. Marianne van Hage, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden


Iliara Puxeddu from Italy for her project “The role of ADAM33 in the origin and Progression of Asthma.” Her host is Prof. Stephen Townley Holgate, University of Southampton, School of Medicine, Southampton, United Kingdom.

 

 

Short Term winners

 

Beata Berent-Maoz from Israel for her project “The role of TRAIL in the mast cell differentiation and apoptosis.” Her host is Prof. Hans-Uwe Simon, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

 

Rebeca Rodriguez Pena from Spain for her project “CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, immune tolerance and allergic responses to betalactams.” Her host is Prof. Sergio Romagnani, Dipartamento di Medicina Interna. Univesita di Firenze, Florence, Italy

303Hannover Medical School Germany
MD/PHD-Program ''Molecular Medicine''
Member of the International PHD-Program (DAAD/DFG)

Hannover Medical School (MHH) (Germany) invites applications for new PhD studentships to commence in October 2005. 20 positions are available, funded by the MHH and its departments. The program is member of the International Postgraduate Program (IPP; DAAD/DFG). Projects are from areas such as: Immunology, Infection and Immunity, Oncology, Differentiation, Signal transduction, Stem Cells etc.

 

Positions are available for MDs as well as PhD students (Biology, Biochemistry etc.). Successful candidates are expected to finish with a PhD, alternatively Dr. rer. nat., within three years. The curriculum is in English. Over 60% of the students come from non-German countries.

 

The deadline for receipt of completed application is: April 1st, 2005.

 

Application forms, further information about the international MD/PhD-Program and the research projects at: www.mh-hannover.de/studium/phd

 

Further information: Dr. Susanne Kruse

Phone: +49-511-532-6011

E-mail: daniel.marlies@mh-hannover.de)

NEW GINA Workshop Report 2002
A Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention.

1252005 World Asthma Day

Date: 3rd May 2005
This year’s World Asthma Day will be celebrated on May, 3rd, 2005 with the theme "The Unmet Needs of Asthma’’. GINA, (Global Initiative for Asthma) addresses this theme to scientists, doctors and patients in order to stress the need for better asthma treatment and control. The theme is built on last year’s World Asthma Day theme, “The Burden of Asthma” and the Global Report that followed it, claiming that by recognizing and meeting the unmet needs of asthma, it is possible to make the first steps to reduce the burden of this important disease.

World Asthma Day takes place yearly on the first Tuesday in May. Each year GINA chooses a theme based on the needs and problematic aspects of asthma and organizes preparation and distribution of World Asthma Day materials and resources in each country.

GINA works with health care professionals and public health officials around the world for the reduction of asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Through resources and publications, such as evidence-based guidelines for asthma management, and events such as the annual celebration of World Asthma Day, GINA is working for the improvement of the lives of people with asthma in every corner of the globe.


1252006 World Asthma Day took place on May 2. The theme of this year's event was "The Unmet Needs of Asthma, "chosen to call the attention of health care workers, governments, and patients alike to the need for better asthma treatment and control.

 

Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, affecting more than 300 million people worldwide1. According to the experts, the unmet needs lead gradually to poorer asthma control. “Although asthma cannot be cured, it can be effectively treated,” says Paul O’Byrne, MD, Chair of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) Executive Committee. He continues: “That so many people around the world find their daily lives limited by asthma symptoms shows that we need to do more to address the unmet needs of asthma.”

 

WAD is organized by the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) in order to improve asthma awareness and care around the world. GINA publishes a Backgrounder on the unmet needs of asthma, along with other relevant documents, all available through the website www.ginasthma.com. GINA was launched in 1993 and it collaborates with health care professionals and public health officials around the world for the reduction of asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality. Through resources and publications, such as evidence-based guidelines for asthma management, and events, such as the annual celebration of World Asthma Day, GINA is working on the improvement of the lives of people with asthma in every corner of the globe.

 

Each year GINA chooses a theme based on the needs and difficult aspects of asthma and organizes preparation and distribution of World Asthma Day materials and resources in each country.

 

 

 

1. Global Burden of Asthma Report, 2004.
Minutes Meeting of the ENT Section of the EAACI Held at the Hotel Fira Palace Barcelona 9th February 2006 Present: Joaquim Mullol (Chairman) Glenis K Scadding (Secretary) Kees van Drunen Livije Kalogjera Wytske Fokkens Peter Hellings 1) The 100+ posters submitted for the EAACI meeting has been reviewed, graded and an oral session proposed for the meeting. 2) Glenis Scadding is to attend the Scientific Programme Committee meeting of EAACI in Vienna on the 24/25th February. 3) Schering Plough have submitted a proposed congestion screen for rhinitis patients. This is to be circulated to all members of the committee who will then send in their thoughts. 4) The EP3OS document – Wytske Fokkens is to provide a pocket guide which will be presented at a new meeting towards the end of 2006. 5) The 7th SERIN meeting will be held in November 2009 in Croatia probably in Dubrovnik, organised by Livije Kalogjera. One day may be jointly held with the asthma section of EAACI. 6) Committee members were asked to present the awards for the best presentations at SERIN at the ceremony on the 10th February 2006. 7) The role of our Section in the European Academy of Otorhinolaryngology was discussed. Livije Kalogjera had attended a meeting in Rome. It was felt that it is important for us to take part in order to have a say in guideline courses etc. Joaquim Mullol is to circulate relevant documents for our consideration. 8) Joaquim Mullol proposed a Task Force on the tools/ methods used in the investigation of rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. He will circulate a proposal. 9) Glenis Scadding proposed a vote of thanks to Joaquim Mullol for his excellent organisation of the 6th SERIN meeting. The meeting was then closed.

* Pediatrics Meeting: The management of pediatric allergy: in whose hands? From bench to bedside
Date: 20th-21st January 2006
Place: Hotel Executive, Milan, Italy
In cooperation with ACAAI and EAACI.
For more information click on http://www.mcaevents.org or email at info@mcaevents.org. To download the programme click here.

* EAACI ENT Section Meeting
Date: 9-11 February, 2006
Place: Barcelona, Spain
For more information email at serin2006@pacifico-meetings.com or click on the website http://pacifico-meetings.com/serin2006.

* 4th EAACI-GA2LEN DAVOS  Meeting
Basic Immunology Research in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date:16-19 February 2006
Place: Eibsee-Hotel, Grainau, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany

* 1st International Symposium on Molecular Allergology Allergen Molecules: Basic and Clinical Aspects
Date: March 31 – April 1, 2006
Place: Rome, Italy
For more information click on www.allergome.org/meetings/rome.html

* GA2LEN Annual Conference
Date: March 29- April 1st, 2006
Place: Berlin, Germany
For more information click on the website www.ga2len.net

* Training Course in Food Allergy
Date: April 8-11, 2006
Place: Middelfart, Denmark

* 2nd International Drug Hypersensitivity Meeting
Clinical Management, Basic Mechanisms, Genetics and latest research on Drug Hypersensitivity.
Date: 18-21 April, 2006
Place: Liverpool, England
For more information click on the website
http://pcwww.liv.ac.uk/drughypersensitivity/index.htm

* IV European Asthma Congress
Date: 22-25 April, 2006
Place: Tenerife, Canary Islands
For more information click on www.immunopathology.org

* 2006 EFA Conference
Date: 10-13 May, 2006
Place: Prague, Czech Republic
For more information click on the EFA website http://www.efanet.org

* IX International Congress of Polish Society of Allergology
Date: 10-13 May, 2006
Place: Wisla, Poland
For more information click on the website www.kongrespta.pl

* HB 2006  Buildings
Creating a healthy indoor environment for people
Date: 4-8 June 2006
Place: Lisboa, Portugal
For more information email at hb2006@fe.up.pt or click on the website www.hb2006.org

* ERS & ISIAN 2006
21st Congress of the European Rhinologic Society
25th International Symposium of Infection and Allergy of the Nose
Date: 11-15 June, 2006
Place: Tampere, Finland
For more information click on www.ers2006isian.com

* 2006 BSACI Annual Meeting
Date: 10-12 July, 2006
Place: Burleigh Court International Conference Centre, Loughborough, UK
For more information click on http://www.bsaci.org/annualmeeting.html

* XVIII World Congress of Asthma
Novel Concepts in Pathogenesis and therapy
Date: 15 -18 July, 2006
Place: Beaulieu, Lausanne, Switzerland
For more information click on www.worldasthma2006.ch

* 14th Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Date: 19-22 August, 2006
Place: Buenos Aires, Argentina
For more information email at latamcong@alergia.org.ar

* 16th ERS Annual Congress
Date: 2-6 September 2006
Place: Munich, Germany
For more information click visit www.ersnet.org.

* Symposium on Aging Research in Immunology: the Impact of Genomics (ARIG)
Date: September 4-5, 2006
Place: Coeur Defense Conference Center, Paris, France.
Student travel grants are available! For more infromation please visit www.arig.ac.at .

* ACAAI - HSACI Joint Allergy Symposium
Allergy update in Greece
Date: 6-9 September 2006
Place: Athens, Greece
For more information click on www.joint-allergy2006.gr

* 17th Annual Scientific Meeting 2006
Australian Society of Clinical Immunology & Allergy Inc.
Date: 7-10 September 006
Place: Manly Pacific Hotel, Manly Beach, Sydney, Australia
More information at education@allergy.org.au or at the website www.allergy.org.au (available in late 2005).

* III International Congress "Modern Methods of Diagnostics and Treatment of Allergy, Asthma and Immunodeficiency"
Date:24-27 September 2006
Place: Sheraton Metekhi Palace Hotel, Tbilisi, Georgia
More information at info@wipocis.org and iaaci@mail.ru.

* 5th Meeting of the European Mucosal Immunology Group
Main topics:Mucosal innate immunity, microbiota and probiotics, inflammation, regulation of immune responses, mucosal vaccines
Date: 5-7 October 2006
Place: Prague, Czech Republic
For more information click on the website www.congressprague.cz/emig2006.

* EASL Monothematic Conference
Main theme: Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis
Date: 7-8 October 2006
Place: University Collegr London, London, UK
For more information click here. Download the Registration Form here.

* XVIII World Congress of Asthma Interasma
International Association of Asthmology
Date: 14-17 October 2006
Place: Hilton Hotel, Guadalajara, Mexico
More information at the website http://www.worldcongressofasthma2006.com/

10 - 14 June 2006
Vienna, Austria

Second Announcement

 

The XXV Congress of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology will take place in Vienna, Austria from 10-14 June, 2006. The meeting’s main theme is “Basic Science in Allergology and Clinical Immunology: a Prerequisite for Improving Patient Care” and it is combined with the celebration of “100 Years of ALLERGY as defined by Clemens von Pirquet”. The EAACI 2006 will be hosted by the Austrian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology at Austria Center Vienna, “located between the towers of the "Donau City" and the United Nations headquarters in the most modern part of Vienna” (R Valenta).

710

Source: ''Wien Tourismus''

Vienna, a capital of the “Holy Roman Empire” and the Hamburgian Monarchy is a true melting pot for many European cultures. Additionally, it holds a strong record in the scientific allergy community as it is where the Austrian pediatrician Clemens von Pirquet coined the term ALLERGY for the first time, in 1906, just 100 years ago. It is therefore allergy’s centennial birthday !!!

Scientific Programme

The rich scientific programme in Vienna 2006 follows a tradition of the highest standards set in all previous EAACI Congresses. Integrated plenary sessions, symposia, workshops, postgraduate courses, pro- and con- sessions on controversial and topical issues are all included in the scientific agenda, set out “to meet the educational and scientific needs of all clinicians and scientists involved in understanding and managing allergic disorders” (A J Frew). Poster Sessions, one of the most powerful and popular activities of the Congress, will be the meeting point for all attendees, covering topics on basic and clinical allergy, asthma and immunology.

The full scientific programme is now available on-line.

 

Social Programme

A day at the EAACI Congress never ends on the closure of the sessions. The social programme for Vienna 2006 is planned with daily tours in the historic city center of Vienna, visits to famed and distinguished museums, operas, and short excursions to small wineries and vineyeards.

 

55A special event is included for the first time in the Social Programme. The 1st EAACI Allergy Run will take place on Saturday, 10 June 2006, at 10.00 am (20 EUR). All EAACI participants are encouraged to take part in the 10 km run along with local runners under conditions of real electronic time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Important Dates

Abstract submission is now open. Submit your abstract on-line.
Deadline for submission: 18 January 2006

 

For abstract submission guidelines and more information, please visit www.congrex.com/eaaci2006.

 

 

The XXV EAACI Congress will be CME Accredited

 

For more information click on the Congress Website: www.congrex.com/eaaci2006/

 

Responsible: SGO Johansson (sgoj@vialen.se)

A revised nomenclature for Allergy
An EAACI Position Statement from the EAACI Nomenclature Task Force.
SGO Johansson, J O’B Hourihane, J. Bousquet,C. Bruijnzeel-Koomen, S. Dreborg, T. Haahtela, M. L. Kowalski,
N. Mygind, J. Ring, P. van Cauwenberge, M. van Hage-Hamsten, B. Wuthrich
ALLERGY (2001):56: 813-824

The EAACI Allergy Definitions represent a Glossary for the most important terms from EAACI Nomenclature Position Statement and is now available in the following languages. You are welcome to print any of those and use in your profession. If your language is missing, please contact the Chairman of the Nomenclature Task Force.

Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lituanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.

Responsible: Paolo Matricardi (matricardi.pm@mclink.it)

Microbial Products in Allergy Prevention & Therapy
P. M. Matricardi, B. Bjorksten, S. Bonini, J. Bousquet, R. Djukanovic, S. Dreborg, J. Gereda, H.-J. Malling, T. Popov, E. Raz, H. Renz, A. Wold for the EAACI Task Force
ALLERGY (2003): 58: 461–471

Task Force 15
Responsible: J Ring (Johannes.Ring@lrz.tu-muenchen.de)

More information will come shortly.

Mehmet Hoxha, Albania
Hector Ariel Badellino, Argentina
Veronika Kirchlechner, Austria
Darina Dimova, Bulgaria
Nadejda Takovska, Bulgaria
Rossitza Bakalova, Bulgaria
Igor Marinic, Croatia
Suzana Ljubojevic, Croatia
Louise Jensen, Denmark
Mona Hojgaard Pedersen, Denmark
Tiia Voor, Estonia
Constantinos Pitsios, Greece
J M Balo-Banga, Hungary
Lajos Attila Réthy, Hungary
Loreta Bagdonaite, Lithuania
Blagica Manceva, FYROM
Ivan Sokolovski, FYROM
Katarina Stavric, FYROM
Tatjana Jakovska-Maretti, FYROM
Eva Maria Rebelo Gomes, Portugal
Anca Zvoristeanu, Romania
Elena-Camelia Berghea, Romania
Liana Marzan, Romania
Elena Savchenko, Russia
Maya Slavkovic-Jovanovic, Serbia- Montenegro
Jenny Van Odijk, Sweden
Madeleine Rådinger, Sweden
Aysen Uguz, Turkey
Khrystyna Lishchuk-Yakymovych, Ukraine
Roksolyana Holovyn, Ukraine
Guzal Sharafutdinova, Uzbekistan

EAACI-GA2LEN Fellowship Programme for 2005:

 

1.      Medium term Fellowships will be funded at 10,000 € each. These fellowships are aimed to fund travel and living expenses for about six months in a foreign European laboratory.

2.     Short-term Fellowships of 5000 € each. The short-term fellowships are aimed to fund a 3 months research fellowship in a foreign European laboratory. Preference is give to specified acquirements of new techniques and establishment of collaborations.

General conditions:

 

1.     To be eligible to apply you must be under the age of 35 and be a member of the EAACI (EAACI-JMA). Please note EAACI junior membership is free to all those aged 35 and under.

2.     Applicants must contact an institution in a foreign European country, that is willing to host them for the whole duration of the fellowship, and define a supervisor. The host supervisor must be a member of EAACI or GA2LEN, or have applied for membership of EAACI at the time of the Fellowship application.

3.     Some of the funding is reserved for exchanges that involve institutions that form part of the GA2LEN network. This may be someone coming from a GA2LEN institution or someone going to a GA2LEN institution.  EAACI money is available for fellowships at non-GA2LEN host institutions and these will be considered on an equal basis.

4.     Your home institution must be willing to release you of all work, laboratory and clinical, during the whole duration of the fellowship and ensure that you will have the possibility to come back after the conclusion of the fellowship.

5.     Adequate fluency in a language that permits effective communication in the host institution is required.

6.      Fellowship recipients are not insured by EAACI or GA2LEN and are encouraged to make sure that both they and the institutions which receive them are fully covered by the necessary insurance’s. Host institutions are encouraged to assist and pay for this. Neither EAACI nor GA2LEN accept any liability.

7.     The Fellowship is a scholarship which in most European countries is tax free. However, the recipient is responsible for any tax that may be required in some countries.

8.      A person may submit only one application at a time.

9.    All documents must be submitted in English by e-mail (executive.office@eaaci.org), fax (+46-8 663 38 15) or by mail (EAACI Executive Office - PO Box 24140 - 104 51 Stockholm - SWEDEN) before the closing date of July 30, 2005. The signed original documents must be received at the EAACI Executive Office within 1 week after the deadline.

10.  Applications that do not include all required forms or forms that are not properly completed will not be considered for review.

11. The applications will be reviewed by an expert panel including representatives of GA2LEN and EAACI and will be handled in strict confidence.

12. The Fellowship period should be planned to start before the end of 2005.

13. Fellowship recipients will be asked to provide a detailed report on the results of the scientific project including a short financial report (no receipts).

 

Application (make 5 copies of each document) must contain:

 

1.      A completed and signed “Application Form

2.      A Curriculum Vitae (maximum 1 A4 page)

3.      List of publications (title, author list + journal issue page) (maximum of 1 key manuscript may be included in your application)

4.      A project description of maximum 4 pages must be prepared in advance together with the host- supervisor. It must be adjusted to the duration of the fellowship and will be the most important part of you application for the reviewers. You should state the relevance and what you expect to obtain with the project.

5.      A letter of invitation from the host institute.

6.      A completed “Host Acceptance Form” signed by the host supervisor.

7.      A completed “Home Institution Release Form” signed by the home supervisor.

Mehmet Hoxha, Albania

Rene Maximiliano Gomez,Argentina

Farzaneh Osati, Canada

Zoran Arsovski, FYROM

Emilija Vlaski, FYROM

Ivan Sokolovski, FYROM

Jordan Minov, FYROM

Katarina Stavric, FYROM

Jovanka Bislimovska Karadzinska, FYROM

Reinhold Kiehl, Germany

Zahra Pourpak, Iran

Ingrida Pumputiene, Lithuania

Edmund Wong, Philippines

Tomaasz Szczerbinski, Poland

Liana-Monica Marzan, Romania

Anca Zvoristeanu, Romania

Maja Slavkovic-Jovanovic, Serbia & Montenegro

Dragan Jovanovic, Serbia & Montenegro

Madeleine Rådinger, Sweden

Ilknur Harebal Can, Turkey

Alla Nakonechna, Ukraine

The aims of the EAACI Fellowship Awards are:

1. To support research and training of EAACI Junior members and Affiliates (JMAs) by offering the possibility to make short- (3 months) or long-term (1 year) fellowships in a foreign European country.
2. To increase the mobility of young researchers within Europe. Movement between EAACI members outside of Europe can also be considered.
3. Spread the implementation of new techniques between European laboratories.
4. Highlight the work of EAACI JMAs through increased publications and a special Fellowship Symposia at the EAACI annual Congresses.

EAACI Fellowship Programme for 2004:

1. 5 Long-term Fellowships of 20 000 € each. The long-term fellowships are aimed to fund travel and living expenses for a full-time 1-year research fellowship in a foreign European laboratory.
2. 5 Short-term Fellowships of 5000 € each. The short-term fellowships are aimed to fund a 3 months research fellowship in a foreign European laboratory. Preference is give to specified acquirements of new techniques and establishment of collaborations.

General conditions:

1. To be eligible to apply you must be under the age of 35 and be a member of the EAACI (EAACI-JMA).
2. You must yourself contact an institution in a foreign European country, who is willing to host you for the whole duration of the fellowship, and define a supervisor. The host supervisor must either be a member of the EAACI, or have applied for membership, at the time of the Fellowship application.
3. Your home institution must be willing to release you of all work, laboratory and clinical, during the whole duration of the fellowship, and ensure that you will have the possibility to come back after the conclusion of the fellowship.
4. Adequate fluency in a language that permits effective communication in the host institution is required.
5. Fellowship recipients are not insured by the EAACI and are encouraged to make sure that both they and the institutions which receive them are fully covered by the necessary insurance’s. Host institutions are encouraged to assist and pay for this. EAACI accepts no liability.
6. The Fellowship is a scholarship which in most European countries is tax free. However, the recipient is responsible for any tax that may be required in some countries.
7. A person may submit only one application at a time.
8. All documents must be submitted in English by e-mail (executive.office@eaaci.org), fax (+46-8 663 38 15) or by mail (EAACI Executive Office - PO Box 24140 - 104 51 Stockholm - SWEDEN) before the closing date of December 15, 2003. The signed original documents must be received at the EAACI Executive Office within 1 week after the deadline.
9. Applications that do not include all required forms or forms that are not properly completed will not be considered for review.
10. The applications will be reviewed by an expert panel and are handled in strict confidence.
11. The Fellowship period must start before the end of 2004.
12. Fellowship recipients will be asked to provide a detailed report on the results of the scientific project including a short financial report (no receipts).

Application (make 5 copies of each document) must contain:

1. A completed and signed "Application Form"
2. A Curriculum Vitae (maximum 1 A4 page)
3. List of publications (title, author list + journal issue page)(maximum of 1 key manuscript may be included in your application)
4. A project description of maximum 4 pages must be prepared in advance together with the host- supervisor. It must be adjusted to the duration of the fellowship and will be the most important part of you application for the reviewers. You should state the relevance and what you expect to obtain with the project.
5. A letter of invitation from the host institute.
6. A completed "Host Acceptance Form" signed by the host supervisor.
7. A completed "Home Institution Release Form" signed by the home supervisor.

We are now proud to announce the Major and Minor Winners of the EAACI Fellowship Award in 2004:

Major Winners

Apostolos Bossios from Greece with his project “Bone marrow activation in asthma and allergy”. His host is Prof. Jan Lötvall, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Tanja Cirkovic Velickovic from Serbia with her project “Engineering of rFel d 1 with altered T-cell epitopes with the potential for application in novel forms of allergen specific immunotherapy”. Her host is Prof. Marianna van Hage-Hamsten, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

Wojciech Feleszko from Poland with his project “Effects of Probiotics on allergen-mediated sensitization and airway inflammation in a murine asthma model”. His host is Prof. Eckard Hamelmann, Department of Pediatric Pneumonology and Immunology, University Hospital Charite in Berlin, Germany.

Musa Khaitov from Russia with his project “The role of type 1 interferons in virus induced exacerbations of asthma”. His host is Prof. Sebastian Johnston, Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute in London, UK.

Cansin Sackesen from Turkey with his project “The role of IFN-y-induced bronchial epithelial cell chemokines in the pathogenesis of asthma”. His host is Prof. Cezmi Akdis, Immunology department, Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research in Davos, Switzerland.

Minor awards

Asunción Martínez from Spain with his project “Effect of corticosteroids on infiltration of proinflammatory cells and cytokine expression pattern in nasal polyposis”. His host is Prof. Wytske Fokkens, ENT Department, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

André Miguel Afonso de Sousa Moreira from Portugal with his project “Effect of the oral supplementation with Lactobacillus rahmnosus on the IgE mediated allergy on marathon runners”. His host is Prof. Tari Haahtela, Department of Clinical Allergology, Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital in Helsinki, Finland.

Cevdet Ozdemir from Turkey with his project ''Oral tolerance in a mouse model of food allergy''. His host is Prof. Harald Renz, Department of Clinical Chemistry & Molecular Diagnostics, Central Laboratory, Hospital of the University in Marburg, Germany

Eva Untersmayr, Austria with her project “Effects of digestion and digestion inhibition on the allergenicity of food antigens. A clinical and epidemiological study”. Her host is Prof. Lars K. Poulsen, Allergy clinic, National University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Franziska Walter from Austria with her project “Establishment of an in vitro M-cell model to study uptake of oral vaccines against allergy”. Her host is David Brayden, University College Dublin, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, Dublin, Ireland.

EAACI received 31 applications for fellowships, and each application was judged by at least three reviewers. Overall, the quality of the applications were very high, and it was not easy to choose the successful awardees.

The EAACI fellowship is regarded as a very successful programme, which has greatly extended the mobility of researchers in the field of allergy and immunology in Europe. This increased mobility will be even further enhanced when the GA2LEN fellowship grants are advertised for the coming years.

Jan Lötvall

For EAACI EXCOM (historian)
Coordinator, EAACI fellowships

Contact Info:
Jan Lötvall
Professor Clinical Allergology
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology
Göteborg University
Bruna Stråket 11
SE-413 45 GÖTEBORG
SWEDEN
Tel: + 46 31 342 2967
Tel: + 46 31 342 6151 (secretary)
Fax: + 46 31 415249

Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG is committed to furthering excellence through research in

ALLERGY DIAGNOSIS • ALLERGY THERAPY • ALLERGY PREVENTION

262

The presentation of the fifth Award will be made in recognition of scientific achievement in the field of Allergology during the World Allergy Congress, Munich 2005.

A submission for the award shall take the form of one full research paper published in an international peer reviewed journal in 2002/2004, together with a curriculum vitae. Applicants must be members or affiliates of the EAACI,
under the age of 40 years, and the research that is the subject of the application must have been conducted in a European centre. Special consideration will be
given to research concerning the mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.

Submissions should be made before 31 December 2004
and addressed to:
The EAACI Executive Office,
Allergopharma Award,
c/o Ms. C. Öström
Karlavägen 108,
elevator V, 8th floor, 10451 Stockholm, Sweden

Further information can be obtained from:
Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG
21465 Reinbek, Germany
Phone: + 49 40 727 65 185
Fax: +49 727 65 318
Website: www.allergopharma.com
E-mail: oliver.cromwell@allergopharma.de
392.Winners1This year’s top prize for the Allergopharma Award on the best scientific research in allergy field, was shared between Dr. Eleanor Ling of Imperial College London and Pr. Eckard Hamelmann of the University Hospital Charité in Berlin. The President of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Pr. Ulrich Wahn, and Herr Joachim Ganzer, managing partner of Allergopharma, congratulated the two winners on the Award Ceremony that took place on June 13th 2004, during the XXIII EAACI Congress in Amsterdam. Dr. Ling was awarded for her work on the relation of regulatory T cell suppression of allergen-driven T cell activation to atopic status and the expression of allergic disease. Her paper was published in the Lancet. The subject of Pr. Hamelmann’s application for the Award concerned the influence of endotoxin and allergen exposure in early life on allergen sensitisation.

The Allergopharma Award was instituted in 2001, in association with the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to recognise excellent research conducted by members of the Academy under the age of 40 years in the field of mechanisms of allergic inflammation and specific immunotherapy.

Vasil Dimitrov, Bulgaria

George Christoff, Bulgaria

David Usharauli, Georgia

Zahra Pourpak, Iran

Dejan Dokic, FYROM

Zoran Arsovski, FYROM

Kamelija Busljetic, FYROM

Emilija Vlaski, FYROM
Genciana Stevcevska, FYROM
Ivan Sokolovski, FYROM Jordan Minov, FYROM
Angelko Gjorcev, FYROM

Sonomjamts Munhbayarlah, Mongolia

Eva Maria Rebelo Gomes, Portugal

Elena-Camelia Berghea, Romania

Cristina Surdu, Romania

Elena Savchenko, Russian

Maja Slavkovic-Jovanovic, Serbia and Montenegro

Dragan Jovanovic, Serbia and Montenegro

Rajica Rajica Stokovic, Serbia and Montenegro

Madeleine Rådinger, Sweden

Gül Karakaya, Turkey

Emel Harmanci, Turkey

Sergei Minenko, Ukraine

Alla Nakonechna, Ukraine

Faris Alenzi, United Kingdom

Rosa Alberta Barroso Sanchez, Venezuela

Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG is a leading company involved in research and development in the field of allergy and clinical immunology.

The Company is committed to furthering excellence through research, and to this end an annual award is made in recognition of excellent research concerning the mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.

The 3rd Allergopharma Award
in the value of 10.000 euro

The presentation of the third award will be made in recognition of scientific achievement in the field of Allergology during the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology Congress, Paris 2003.

The recipient should be a member or affiliate of the EAACI, under the age of 40 years, who has conducted research in a European centre. An application for consideration for the award shall take the form of a full research paper published in an international peer reviewed journal in 2000/2002, together with a curriculum vitae. Special consideration will be given to research concerning the mechanisms of allergic inflammation and allergen specific immunotherapy.

The Award will be decided by an ad hoc Commission nominated by the EAACI Executive Committee and Allergopharma. Candidates for the Award can apply directly or be nominated by a member of the Award Commission. A simultaneous application for a similar award cannot be submitted and only one application may be made by a research group.

Submissions should be made before 10 January, 2003 and addressed to:

EAACI Executive Office
Allergopharma Award
c/o Ms. C. Öström
PO Box 24 140
Karlavägen 108, 8th floor
SE-10451 Stockholm
Sweden

Further information can be obtained from Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG, 21465 Reinbek, Germany. Phone: + 49 40 727 65 185, Fax: +49 727 65 201, web site: www.allergopharma.de

Major Winners

 

Pavels Gordins from Latvia

His host was Dr. Frank Anderson, Infection, Inflammation & Repair, University of Southhampton, Southampton General Hospital, UK.

 

Aleksandar Petlichkovski from Macedonia.

His host was Dr. Todor Popov, Department of Allergology, Medical Academy in Sofia, Bulgaria.

 

Claudio D’Ambrosio from Italy

His host was Prof. Sergio Bonini, Institute of Neurobiology & Molecular Medicine, Italian National Research Council, Rome, Italy.

 

Katarzyna Solarwicz from Poland.

Her host was Prof. Kurt Blazer, Swiss Institute of Allergy & Asthma Research, Davos, Switzerland.

 

Peter Hellings from Belgium.

His host was Prof. J. L. Ceuppens, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, O & N, Leuven, Belgium.

 

Susanne Gabrielsson from Sweden.

Her host was Prof. Rudolf Valenta, Molecular Immunopathology Group, Dept of Pathophysiology, Vienna General Hospital, Austria.

 

 

 

Minor awards

 

Annabella Procoli from Italy.

Her host was Dr. Ignacio Ansotegui, Santiago Apostol Hospital, Immunology Laboratory, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.

 

Cinzia Maria Bellettato from Italy.

Her host was Prof. Sebastian Johnston, Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College of Science, London, UK.

 

Anna Åsa Dorothea Kasche from Germany.

Her host was Prof. Per Venge, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Uppsala, Sweden.

After the success of the EAACI Naples Congress we are pleased to announce the Winners of the following competitions:

EAACI Exchange Research Fellowships 2002

Major Winners
Pavels Gordins - Latvia
Aleksandar Petlichkovski - FYROM
Claudio D'Ambrosio - USA
Katarzyna Solarwicz - Poland
Peter Hellings - Belgium
Susanne Gabrielsson - Sweden

Minor Winners
Annabella Procoli - Italy
Cinzia Maria Bellettato - Italy
Anna Åsa Dorethea Kasche - Germany
Paska Csilla - Hungary

ALLERGOPHARMA Award

Winner
Susanne Vrtala - Austria

EAACI Media Awards

Winners - TV category
1st Prize: Martine Allain-Regnault & Laurent Broomhead
(''Les allergies en question'')
2nd Prize: Marc Moras & Jo Frére (''Astma en allergie'')

Winners - Lay print category
1st Prize: Adrain Morris (The allergy guide)
2nd Prize: Hervé Masson & Philippe Auriol
(www.allergique.org and www.allergie.remede.org)

JMA Poster Prizes

Winners
E. Von Hoffen - 56
S. Guerra - 97
A. Riemer - 163
P.W. Hellings - 404
D. Bullens - 416
A. Gaspar - 571
E. Melén - 568
A. Ptasinska - 717
P. Verdino - 882
E. Volanaki - 965

Major Winners
Dietke Buck from Germany.
His host was Dr. Jean-Pierre de Villartay, INSERM, Hospital Necker, Paris, France.

Radoslaw Spiewak from Poland.
His host was Prof. Johannes Ring, Munich Technical University, Centre for Allergy & Enviroment, Munich, Germany.

Alessandra Micera from Italy.
Her host was Prof. Francesca Levi-Schaffer, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Dept of Pharmacology, Jerusalem, Israel.

Philippe Gevaert from Belgium.
His host was Prof. Joachim Lundahl, Karolinska Hospital, Dept of Clinical Immunology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Marianna Bellafiori from Italy.
Her host was Dr. D.E. Davies, Brooke Laboratory, Division of Infection, Inflammation & Repair, Southampton General Hospital, UK.

 

Minor awards

 

Igor Kaidashev from Ukraine.

His host was Prof. Marek Kowalski, University School of Medicine of Lodz, Dept. of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Lodz, Poland.

 

Ervin Mingomataj from Albania.

His host was Prof. Axel Fischer, Clinical Research Unit of Allergy, Dept. of Pediatrics, Charité, Berlin, Germany.

 

Alessandro Lambiase from Italy.

His host was Prof. Harald Renz, Dept of Clinical Chemistry & Molecular Diagnostics, Central Laboratory, Marburg, Germany.

 

Ilaria Puxeddu from Italy.

Her host was Prof. Francesca Levi-Schaffer, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Dept of Pharmacology, Jerusalem, Israel.

 

Elona Gjebra from Albania.

Her host was Prof. Jean Emberlin, Pollen Research Unit, University College Worcester, UK.

Responsible: SGO Johansson (sgoj@vialen.se)

A revised nomenclature for Allergy
An EAACI Position Statement from the EAACI Nomenclature Task Force.
SGO Johansson, J O’B Hourihane, J. Bousquet,C. Bruijnzeel-Koomen, S. Dreborg, T. Haahtela, M. L. Kowalski,
N. Mygind, J. Ring, P. van Cauwenberge, M. van Hage-Hamsten, B. Wuthrich
ALLERGY (2001):56: 813-824

The EAACI Allergy Definitions represent a Glossary for the most important terms from EAACI Nomenclature Position Statement and is now available in the following languages. You are welcome to print any of those and use in your profession. If your language is missing, please contact the Chairman of the Nomenclature Task Force.

Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lituanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.

Task Force 15
Responsible: J Ring (Johannes.Ring@lrz.tu-muenchen.de)

More information will come shortly.

Task Force 5
Responsible: Werner Pichler ( pichler@insel.ch )

For Immediate reactions:
Diagnosis of immediate allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics
M.J. TORRES, M.BLANCA, J.FERNANDEZ, A.ROMANO, A.WECK, W. ABERER, K.BROCKOW, W.J.PICHLER, P.DEMOLY, for ENDA, the EAACI interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003), 58,10:961-972

For Non immediate reactions:
Diagnosis of immediate allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics
M.J. TORRES, M.BLANCA, J.FERNANDEZ, A.ROMANO, A.WECK, W. ABERER, K.BROCKOW, W.J.PICHLER, P.DEMOLY, for ENDA, the EAACI interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003), 58,10:961-972

Task Force 12
Responsible: Sergio Bonini (sbonini@mclink.it)

Organisation of health care on Allergy and Clinical Immunology
European standards and minimal requirements for allergy and clinical immunology services (Allergy Services)

Background
Even in countries where Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ACI) is recognised as a specialty or subspecialty, ACI services are often not recognised by the National Health System and allergy diagnosis and treatment is covered by Departments of Internal Medicine or of other Specialties. Moreover, there are no recent position statements about specific tasks and minimal requirements for ACI services, in the past clearly defined by WHO-IUIS documents.

Aim of the TF
The Task Force should aim at:

- Producing position statements and reference European Guidelines for National Health Services

- Re-evaluating the professional skills acquired through         a specific education in ACI

- Highlighting the specific competence and importance for the various national health services of allergists and clinical immunologists

- Defining the features and tasks of different ACI Services, depending on their location and goals (for instance Excellence National Centres, Central Regional Services, Local Services).

Composition of the TF
The composition of the TF should answer some often conflicting needs:

- To get information on existing structures and needs of all national (and regional) environments. This would imply a high number of members

- To produce concrete results in a short time and at a low cost (usually an objective only achieved by small working groups).

On the basis of the above considerations, it is proposed to structure the TF as having three different components:

A drafting group made of 3 persons uncharged to collect the information and to write documents. The following names are suggested for this task: S. Bonini, K. Nekam.

A consultive board  of up to for ensuring transnational representation, specific areas of competence (paediatrics), links to other EAACI bodies.
For this board the following names are proposed, but others can be suggested by the Executive Committee: R. Dahl, G.S. Del Giacco, M. Kowalski, G. Lack, H. Mosbech, C. Pascual,
T. Popov, J. Rosado Pinto, C. Saxoni Photini. The consultive board should meet at least one a year, possibly at EAACI Congresses.

An assembly of Members at large representing all countries members of the EAACI, to be consulted by E-mail.

Task Force 14
Responsible: W Fokkens (W.J.Fokkens@amc.uva.nl)


EAACI Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps

Executive Summary - Complete Paper
ALLERGY (2005): 60: 583–601


Background

Update November 2004
TF final report was sent for approval on November 3rd, 2004. The ExCom approved the paper but was sceptic about the potential cost of publishing as a whole supplement in ALLERGY. The Editor-in-Chief advised that it was possible to publish an Executive Summary of the paper in ALLERGY, while the Editors of Rhinology expressed their will for publication as a supplement, which was finally agreed.

Update May 2004
WF reported on 040507 that TF14 is almost finished. The PP has been assembled and will go to the whole group for final approval.

WF advises that this group is also trying to work with a parallel American task force led by Eli Melzer and Daniel Hamilos. This is a task force set up by 5 American societies, the AAAAI, AA Otolaryngic Allergy, AAOHNS, ACAAI, and ARS. Their title is ''Rhinosinusitis: establishing definitions for clinical research and patient care''. WF is working with Dan Hamilos to try to bring the two papers in line as much as possible, although quite some differences do still exist.

EAACI-ERS Joint Task Force 16
Responsible: L Delgado (jldelgado@mail.telepac.pt) & S del Giacco (delgiac@tiscali.it)

Members of the Task Force:
EAACI: Bonini S. (Italy), Canonica G.W. (Italy), Del Giacco St. (Italy), Delgado L. (Portugal), Galatas J. (Greece), Haahtela T. (Finland), Popov T. (Bulgaria), Van Cauwenberge P. (Belgium).

ERS:
Anderson S.D. (Australia), Bjermer L. (Sweden), Brusasco V. (Italy), Carlsen K.H. (Norway), Drobnic F. (Spain), Larsson K. (Sweden), Palange P. (Italy).

IOC: Cummiskey J, (Ireland)

Observer: Khaltev N, (WHO)

Background

Update November 2004
As part of their IG report, the IGAAS requested continuing funding for the TF on recognising and diagnosing exercise-related hypersensitivity in sports. The ExCom was sceptic towards such a prospective and requested for a formal report on the overall expenditure and the future activities.

Update May 2004
The TF met in Monaco on May 13-14, 2004 at the 3rd Sports & Science Forum (an organization of Sergio Bonini and Walter Canonica with members of the International Olympic Committee Medical Comission). During the meeting, they reviewed the written contributions from both EAACI & ERS members, aiming to join up several parts of the first contribution on: "Asthma and Sports: Diagnosis, Treatment and the relationship to Doping".

In addition to Asthma & Sports contribution, an evidence-based Position Paper covering practical aspects of the management of Asthma & Allergy in Sports, will also be produced, shortly.

Task Force 17
Responsible
: Jean Bousquet (jean.bousquet@wanadoo.fr)


Background

This initiative is under the overall supervision of Onno van Schayck. JB reported on 040507 that the IPAG project is almost finalized and the first draft of the report has been circulated among the members of ARIA, GINA and GOLD. It should be finalized before the WONCA Meeting in Orlando in October 2004.

Task Force 5
Responsible: Werner Pichler ( pichler@insel.ch )

For Immediate reactions:
Diagnosis of immediate allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics
M.J. TORRES, M.BLANCA, J.FERNANDEZ, A.ROMANO, A.WECK, W. ABERER, K.BROCKOW, W.J.PICHLER, P.DEMOLY, for ENDA, the EAACI interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003), 58,10:961-972


For Non immediate reactions:
Diagnosis of immediate allergic reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics
M.J. TORRES, M.BLANCA, J.FERNANDEZ, A.ROMANO, A.WECK, W. ABERER, K.BROCKOW, W.J.PICHLER, P.DEMOLY, for ENDA, the EAACI interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003), 58,10:961-972

Responsible: Paolo Matricardi (matricardi.pm@mclink.it)

Microbial Products in Allergy Prevention & Therapy
P. M. Matricardi, B. Bjorksten, S. Bonini, J. Bousquet, R. Djukanovic, S. Dreborg, J. Gereda, H.-J. Malling, T. Popov, E. Raz, H. Renz, A. Wold for the EAACI Task Force
ALLERGY (2003): 58: 461–471

Task Force 12
Responsible: Sergio Bonini (sbonini@mclink.it)

Organisation of health care on Allergy and Clinical Immunology
European standards and minimal requirements for allergy and clinical immunology services (Allergy Services)

Background
Even in countries where Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ACI) is recognised as a specialty or subspecialty, ACI services are often not recognised by the National Health System and allergy diagnosis and treatment is covered by Departments of Internal Medicine or of other Specialties. Moreover, there are no recent position statements about specific tasks and minimal requirements for ACI services, in the past clearly defined by WHO-IUIS documents.

Aim of the TF
The Task Force should aim at:

- Producing position statements and reference European Guidelines for National Health Services

- Re-evaluating the professional skills acquired through         a specific education in ACI

- Highlighting the specific competence and importance for the various national health services of allergists and clinical immunologists

- Defining the features and tasks of different ACI Services, depending on their location and goals (for instance Excellence National Centres, Central Regional Services, Local Services).

Composition of the TF
The composition of the TF should answer some often conflicting needs:

- To get information on existing structures and needs of all national (and regional) environments. This would imply a high number of members

- To produce concrete results in a short time and at a low cost (usually an objective only achieved by small working groups).

On the basis of the above considerations, it is proposed to structure the TF as having three different components:

A drafting group made of 3 persons uncharged to collect the information and to write documents. The following names are suggested for this task: S. Bonini, K. Nekam.

A consultive board  of up to for ensuring transnational representation, specific areas of competence (paediatrics), links to other EAACI bodies.
For this board the following names are proposed, but others can be suggested by the Executive Committee: R. Dahl, G.S. Del Giacco, M. Kowalski, G. Lack, H. Mosbech, C. Pascual,
T. Popov, J. Rosado Pinto, C. Saxoni Photini. The consultive board should meet at least one a year, possibly at EAACI Congresses.

An assembly of Members at large representing all countries members of the EAACI, to be consulted by E-mail.

Task Force 14
Responsible: W Fokkens (W.J.Fokkens@amc.uva.nl)


EAACI Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps
Executive Summary - Complete Paper
ALLERGY (2005): 60: 583–601

Background

Update November 2004
TF final report was sent for approval on November 3rd, 2004. The ExCom approved the paper but was sceptic about the potential cost of publishing as a whole supplement in ALLERGY. The Editor-in-Chief advised that it was possible to publish an Executive Summary of the paper in ALLERGY, while the Editors of Rhinology expressed their will for publication as a supplement, which was finally agreed.

Update May 2004
WF reported on 040507 that TF14 is almost finished. The PP has been assembled and will go to the whole group for final approval.

WF advises that this group is also trying to work with a parallel American task force led by Eli Melzer and Daniel Hamilos. This is a task force set up by 5 American societies, the AAAAI, AA Otolaryngic Allergy, AAOHNS, ACAAI, and ARS. Their title is ''Rhinosinusitis: establishing definitions for clinical research and patient care''. WF is working with Dan Hamilos to try to bring the two papers in line as much as possible, although quite some differences do still exist.

EAACI-ERS Joint Task Force 16
Responsible: L Delgado (jldelgado@mail.telepac.pt) & S del Giacco (delgiac@tiscali.it)

Members of the Task Force:
EAACI: Bonini S. (Italy), Canonica G.W. (Italy), Del Giacco St. (Italy), Delgado L. (Portugal), Galatas J. (Greece), Haahtela T. (Finland), Popov T. (Bulgaria), Van Cauwenberge P. (Belgium).

ERS:
Anderson S.D. (Australia), Bjermer L. (Sweden), Brusasco V. (Italy), Carlsen K.H. (Norway), Drobnic F. (Spain), Larsson K. (Sweden), Palange P. (Italy).

IOC: Cummiskey J, (Ireland)

Observer: Khaltev N, (WHO)

Background

Update November 2004
As part of their IG report, the IGAAS requested continuing funding for the TF on recognising and diagnosing exercise-related hypersensitivity in sports. The ExCom was sceptic towards such a prospective and requested for a formal report on the overall expenditure and the future activities.

Update May 2004
The TF met in Monaco on May 13-14, 2004 at the 3rd Sports & Science Forum (an organization of Sergio Bonini and Walter Canonica with members of the International Olympic Committee Medical Comission). During the meeting, they reviewed the written contributions from both EAACI & ERS members, aiming to join up several parts of the first contribution on: "Asthma and Sports: Diagnosis, Treatment and the relationship to Doping".

In addition to Asthma & Sports contribution, an evidence-based Position Paper covering practical aspects of the management of Asthma & Allergy in Sports, will also be produced, shortly.

Task Force 17
Responsible: Jean Bousquet (jean.bousquet@wanadoo.fr)

Background

This initiative is under the overall supervision of Onno van Schayck. JB reported on 040507 that the IPAG project is almost finalized and the first draft of the report has been circulated among the members of ARIA, GINA and GOLD. It should be finalized before the WONCA Meeting in Orlando in October 2004.

Responsible: Carsten Bindslev-Jensen

Standardization of Food Challenges in Patients with Immediate Reactions to Foods
C. Bindslev-Jensen, B. K. Ballmer-Weber, U. Bengtsson, C. Blanco, C. Ebner, J. Hourihane, A. C. Knulst, D. A. Moneret-Vautrin, K. Nekam, B. Niggemann, M. Osterballe, C. Ortolani,
J. Ring, C. Schnopp, T. Werfel
ALLERGY (2004), 59:690-697

Responsible: Werner Pichler ( pichler@insel.ch )

Drug provocation testing in the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions: general considerations
W.ABERER, A.BIRCHER, A. ROMANO, M. BLANCA, P. CAMPI, J.FERNANDEZ, K. BROCKOW, W. J. PICHLER, P. DEMOLY for ENDA, and the EAACI Interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003),58:854
Standardization of Food Challenges in Patients with Immediate Reactions to Foods
C. Bindslev-Jensen, B. K. Ballmer-Weber, U. Bengtsson, C. Blanco, C. Ebner, J. Hourihane, A. C. Knulst, D. A. Moneret-Vautrin, K. Nekam, B. Niggemann, M. Osterballe, C. Ortolani,
J. Ring, C. Schnopp, T. Werfel
ALLERGY (2004), 59:690-697
Responsible: Werner Pichler ( pichler@insel.ch )
Drug provocation testing in the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions: general considerations
W.ABERER, A.BIRCHER, A. ROMANO, M. BLANCA, P. CAMPI, J.FERNANDEZ, K. BROCKOW, W. J. PICHLER, P. DEMOLY for ENDA, and the EAACI Interest group on DRUG HYPERSENSITIVITY
ALLERGY (2003),58:854
Task Force 8
Responsible: Lars Poulsen


TF-completed.
Task Force 8
Responsible: Lars Poulsen


TF-completed.

The Sahlgrenska Academy formally announces a post as:

Professor of Respiratory medicine
including A position as senior physician at
Sahlgrenska University hospital

The post is a professorial chair at the Institute of Internal Medicine.

Reference number: E 311 3796/04

This is a chair at the Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, which is part of the Institute of Internal medicine. The Department is closely affiliated with the corresponding wards and departments at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. All these academic and medical units cooperate closely in the areas of specialization of respiratory medicine and allergology, in research and medical care, as well as teaching. The research carried out in these disciplines builds on collaboration in basic experimental research, patient-related clinical research and epidemiology.

Responsibilities: Conducting, directing and developing international, high-level, research in respiratory medicine. Supervising PhD students and mentoring researchers who have completed their PhDs. Teaching undergraduate medical students and other professionals.

Grounds for eligibility: Scientific and pedagogical skills, and competence in a relevant area of clinical specialization.

Grounds for assessment: Primarily scientific and secondarily pedagogical skills.

Administrative skills will also be taken into consideration in making the appointment, as well as the ability to co-operate.

For information:

* About this post

Department head, Professor Jan Lötvall,
+46 31 342 29 67
Department director, Professor Olle Isaksson
+46 31 342 38 39

* Trade union representatives:

OFR/S S (The Public Employees’ Negotiation Council)
Eva Sjögren +46 31 773 11 71 –
SACO (The Swedish Confederation of Professional
Associations)
Annika Badre +46 31 773 11 70 – SEKO (The Union of
Service and Communication Employees)
Lennart Olsson +46 31 773 11 73

Application: Please append to your application your curriculum vitae and the various other supporting documents about your qualifications required in accordance with the instructions, available in Swedish only as*: “Anvisningar för upprättande av meritportföljer”. Your application and all supporting documents are to be submitted in triplicate.

Application forms may be downloaded from: www.sahlgrenska.gu.se/akademin/dokument/meritport/index.jsp (for support in the process of application, please do not hesitate to contact Jan Lötvall (jan.lotvall@mednet.gu.se).

The 20 publications you select for submission are to be enclosed in triplicate with your application.

Your signed application form, including the above-mentioned reference number, must have reached the Sahlgrenska Academy office no later than 11 November 2004.

Mailing address: Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, The Registrar, Box 400, SE-405 30 Göte­borg SWEDEN

Street address: Medicinaregatan 3

  • The board met in Croatia in April and in December in Copenhagen, relevant minutes have been circulated.
  • Housekeeping rules have been created and must be approved at this occasion.
  • It was decided to include our JMA as member with voting rights – since the bylaws only allows for 6 members in the board, we so far decided to include our JMA as an Adjunct Member. This item should also be discussed.
  • Two Task forces are currently working: one on APT chaired by Kristiina Turjanmaa and a second one has just been approved by ExCom, namely on Late phase reactions in AD, chaired by Thomas Werfel. Discussion with Rudolf Valenta on presenting the APT position paper in Vienna is undergoing.
  • The Vienna program has adopted most of our decisions, including a session together with ESCD.

Future congresses:

  • Vienna
  • Gothenburg
  • Barcelona
  • Warsaw
  • London
  • Istanbul

The two latter may be switched.

Regarding the process of evaluating abstracts or the congresses, it has been agreed between Pediatric and Dermatology Sections, that we evaluate abstracts on dermatological topics together.

Activities 2004/2005

  • Urticaria Consensus Meeting October, Berlin
  • Newsletter June 2005
  • Planning and approval for Food Allergy Course april 2006, together with Ped Section
  • Practall – a Joint Initiative between EAACI and AAAAI on the topic AD. Two more are planned, Anaphylaxis and Pediatric Asthma.

  • For 2006, 2-3 summer schools EAACI/GA2LEN are scheduled. One is already accepted in Oslo, two more are currently being evaluated. Application for summer schools must be filed in during the next two months.

Dermatology section should propose a summer school for 2006 or 2007 (preferentially). Topic should be decided here.

Unsolved issues to be addressed in the next period:

  • The number of members with voting rights in our Section is stable at a low level (280). ENT is closing in on us and we need to find ways of increasing the number of our core members. This can only be done internally by taking members from other sections - an unwise solution: Instead we should attract members from outside EAACI and talks with EADV and ESCD has been initiated and will be substantiated in the near future.
  •  

  • Our JMA, Ulrike Raap has been nominated JMA Chair and will represent the JMA in ExCom. She has been replaced by Dr Elena Borzova, from Russia. A warm welcome to you. We must decide whether our JMA is an ordinary member or an adjunct member. The work in ExCom has been interesting and sometimes hard – there are a lot of things to be learnt especially since there are several political issues to be aware of at and between the meetings. But our impact is increasing and we should strengthen our efforts in seeking influence there. Therefore I am willing to serve another period as chairman of our Section.


Carsten Bindslev-Jensen

1 – Board
The board is elected according to the bylaws of the EAACI.
In addition, the JMA Dermatology representative is taken as an Adjunct Board Member with full responsibilities and voting rights. He/she will count as the 8th ordinary member of the board. The number of members present to make a formal decision is 4/8, single majority votes (e.g. 5/3) are required for decisions. Only members present at the meeting are allowed to be elected for their first period serving on the board.

2 – Section board meetings
Minimum twice per year: one at the EAACI congress, one at the Derm Section meeting. In years with no section meeting, the meeting should be held preferably at other congress, e.g. EADV. Extra meeting in case of urgent matters is possible if it is announced by the chairman one month in advance, unless all board members have unanimously accepted a prior meeting. Electronic communication, telephone conference may be used for intermediate decisions. Meetings are normally on invitation by the chairman, but any member of board can request on extra meetings or electronic/telephone conferences. In this case, a majority decision is required by e-mail in advance. Any extra meeting in person is subject to available funding.
Meetings are chaired by the chairman, in unexpected absence by the secretary.

3 – Daily routine
The daily routine is run by the Chairmen and Secretary, all communication should be preferably by e-mail and all board members will be copied in.

4 – Section activities

4.1 Meetings
At the EAACI Congress, the section should ensure a balanced programme regarding dermatological contents in allergy.

EAACI Derm section meetings should be held preferably annually, external additional funding should be looked for every 2-3 years, joint meetings with other sections are encouraged.

Joint sessions at international or national dermatology congresses, esp. EADV, are desirable.

4.2 Internet
The internet should provide information about meetings, protocols of board meetings, task forces, guidelines, activities (responsible: secretary).

4.3 Guidelines
Guidelines on relevant subjects should be prepared by the section, if possible of highest level. Guidelines prepared by other sections or the EAACI ExCom dealing with dermatological topics in allergy should be co-authored by the Derm Section.

4.4 Task forces
In topics of dermatology where special attention is needed, the Derm Section should be putting up EAACI Task Forces.

4.5 Other activities
All other activities which are in the interest of the aims of the EAACI and dermatology in allergy, e.g. contact with patient organisation, are encouraged, but usually not extra-funded.

5 – Collaboration with other institutions
Collaboration with other institutions, especially GA²LEN, is strongly encouraged.

6 – Financial affairs
Both, the Chairman and the Secretary, are responsible for the correct spending of the budget, all decisions on higher sums of spending, esp. for section meetings, need to be approved by the board.

All junior activities were marked with great success in Munich 2005. Starting with the Junior Poster Session, which was held on the Opening Evening of the congress, more than 180 junior members presented and discussed their work with junior colleagues as well as senior members of the Academy.
Moreover, ten poster prizes of 300 € were awarded for outstanding poster presentations through sponsorship of Pharmacia Diagnostics AB.  These are:

1) Asthma: P Bogaert (Belgium)
2) Rhinitis: A Vroling (Netherlands)
3) Dermatology: I Angelova (Bulgaria)
4) Paediatrics: M Schedel (Germany)
5) Food allergy: Y Lorenz (Germany)
6) Allergens: J Wallmann (Austria)
7) Immunotherapy: R Weiss (Austria)
8) Clinical Immunology: J Makowska (Poland)
9) Immunology: I C Nassenstein (Germany)
10) Immunology: II A Taylor (Switzerland)

648649

The Junior Social Event followed on the same evening in a former bathhouse, which proved to be a great opportunity for all junior members to meet and get to know each other in a friendly and relaxed environment.

Snapshots from Munich!

The Junior Member Symposium took place on Thursday. H Hammad (NL), Bel Elisabeth (NL), Vermaelen K (BE) and Raap Ulrike (DE) were the speakers of this session.

The Junior Member Educational Session included two parts; one focused on the best possible ways for presenting a scientific project (Anthony Frew), while the second was an introduction on understanding statistics in medical research (Thomas Keil).

Finally, during the Junior Member Business Meeting the New EAACI JMA Working Group was presented:

- JMA chair (Ex Com): Dr U Raap, Germany (mail@ulrike-raap.de
- JMA past chair (SPC): Dr Ph Gevaert, Belgium (Philippe.Gevaert@UGent.be)
- ENT: Dr P Hellings, Belgium (peter.hellings@med.kuleuven.ac.be)
- Dermatology: Dr E Borzova, Russia (eborzova@online.ru)
- Immunology: Dr M Kurowski, Poland (marcin.kurowski@gazeta.pl)
- Asthma: Dr D Groneberg, Germany (david.groneberg@charite.de)
- Paediatrics: Dr L Borrego, Portugal (miguel.borrego@sapo.pt)
- Webmaster: Dr C Skevaki, Greece (cskevaki@allergy.gr)

650 675

 

by Peter W. Hellings, JMA Representative ENT Section

In the beginning of April, the Advanced Sinus Surgery Course took place in the Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, organized by Prof. Wytske Fokkens, present head of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the AMC and chairman of the ENT Section of the EAACI.

This two-day course aimed at extending both the theoretical knowledge as well as practical skills of ENT surgeons beyond the boundaries of the sinonasal cavity. This first course was attended by 55 participants from 10 different countries. The teacher of honour was Professor Valerie Lund, London, U.K., authority in the field of sinus surgery and well-known for her contribution to sinonasal tumor surgery. The lectures by the board of teachers covered a wide range of topics, from image-guided surgical navigation and powered instrumentation, to mucocoeles, hypophysectomy, frontal sinus surgery, endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy, orbital decompression, sinonasal tumor surgery and handling of complications after sinus surgery.

During the course, participants were allowed to actively train their operative skills in endoscopic sinus surgery on cadaver heads. The facilities made available for each of the participants were high-standard, including whole skulls, CT scans of the skulls, own monitors and powered instruments (cfr. pictures). The dissection manual was especially designed for the course and guided the participants step-by-step through the different sinus surgery techniques with emphasis on helpful tips and highlighting pitfalls of sinus surgery.
As an ENT surgeon, I recommend this course to ENT surgeons with special interest in sinus surgery as most participants rated the quality of the course from very good to excellent. The next course will be held in April 2005.

347 346

Pic 1: Overview of training facility in the dissection room.
Pic 2: Professor Wytske Fokkens in discussion during the sinus surgery training session.

EAACI WEBMASTER
Nikos Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
COMMUNICATIONS/BRUSSELS OFFICE
Anne Wilmes  wilmes.anne@skynet.be
NEWSLETTER EDITOR
Claus Bachert  claus.bachert@rug.ac.be
EAACI WEBMASTER ASSISTANT
Irene Andriopoulou irinia@allergy.gr

SECTION WEBMASTERS
Asthma
I Agache ibrumaru@unitbv.ro
ENT
C Nunes cn@imunoalergologia.com
Dermatology
C Bindslev-Jenssen 
Carsten.Bindslev-Jensen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Pediatrics
A Muraro muraro@pediatria.unipd.it
Immunology
T Jakob thilo.jakob@gsf.de

INTEREST GROUP WEBMASTERS
Aerobiology & Pollution
M Orta morta@imqnavarra.com
Allergy, Asthma & Sports
J Galatas doby@hol.gr
Immunotherapy
D Caillot dcaillot@wanadoo.fr
E Valovirta  erkka.valovirta@allergiakeskus.net
Infections & Allergy
N Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
Drug Allergy
J Fernandez fernandez_jav@gva.es
Functional Genomics & proteomics
R. Pawliczak  rafal.pawliczak@csk.am.lodz.pl
Food Allergy
G Reese  reege@pei.de
Occupational Allergy
J Walusiak jolantaw@imp.lodz.pl
Diagnostic Tests
J Kleine-Tebbe kleine-tebbe@allergie-experten.de
Ocular Allergy
St Bonini sbonini@mclink.it
Insects Venom Hypesensitivity
J Fernandez fernandez_jav@gva.es
COMMITTEE WEBMASTERS 
JMA

I Agache ibrumaru@unitbv.ro
Ethics
K Nekam nekamkr.allergy@mail.datanet.hu
Specialty
J Gayraud j.gayraud@wanadoo.fr
CME
A Negri a.negri@cme-icap.it
Ex.Com.
N Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
EAACI Ex. Office
D. Öwerström Deirdre.Owerstrom@eaaci.org
Technical Advisor (Steficon)
M Sarantinos msarantinos@steficon.com
Technical Advisor (Congrex)
B Pehrson bjorn@shocklogic.com
EAACI WebMaster Assistant
I Andriopoulou irinia@allergy.gr

* Workshop on Animal Models of Asthma
Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine (ITEM)
Date: 28-29 January, 2005
Place: Hannover, Germany
For more information contact Dr Armin Braun (braun@item.fraunhofer.de) or click on www.item.fraunhofer.de

* 3rd EAACI Davos Meeting in Basic Immunology in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Date: 3-6 February 2005
Place: Davos, Switzerland
For more information contact siaf@siaf.unizh.ch or click on www.siaf.unizh.ch/EAACI_meeting/EAACI_2004.html

* III World Congress on Immunopathology & Respiratory Allergy
Date: 5 - 8 February, 2005
Place: Pattaya, Thailand
Main themes: Allergy & Asthma, Autoimmune Diseases, Immunodeficiency and Basic Immunology, the Immune System Physiology
For more information click on www.isir.ru/thailand/general.html

* 3rd Annual Meeting of the Egyptian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (ESPAI)
Date: February 24-25, 2005
Place: Cairo Conrad Hotel, Cairo, Egypt
More information on the email congress@espai-eg.org or click on www.espai-eg.org/scientific.htm.

* First International Congress on Immunodeficiency Disorders
Date: 28 February-2 March 2005
Place: Tehran, Iran
Main theme: Immunodeficiencies, Immunogenetics, Immunodiagnosis and Infections
For more information click on www.iaari.hbi.ir/icid.htm

* VII International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections
Date:  March 3 – 6, 2005
Place: Curacao Marriott Beach Resort, Curacao, The Dutch Antilles
Keydates:  December 15, 2004 – Early registration fee
January 5, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts due
January 5, 2005 – All abstracts due
For the program, registration and more information click on www.themacraegroup.com

* Frontiers in Neonatal & Infant Immunity
Date: March 18-20, 2005
Place: Westin Palace, Madrid Spain
Keydates:  January 10, 2005 – Early registration fee
January 10, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts due
January 10, 2005 – All abstracts due
February 10, 2005 – Hotel reservation deadline for group rate
The event is CME Accredited.
For the program, registration and more information click on www.themacraegroup.com.

* 61st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI)
Date: March 18-23, 2005
Place: San Antonio, Texas, USA
More information on: www.aaaai.org

* GA2LEN Annual Conference
Date: 18-19 April, 2005
Place: Ghent, Belgium
More information at the website: www.ga2len.net

* 1st Baltic Allergy Congress
Lithuanian Society of Allergollogy & Clinical Immunology
Date: 24-25 May, 2005
Place: Vilnius, Lihtuania
Main Theme: "Allergy: From the Past to the Future"
More information on www.balticconference.com/bac2005

* 10th EFA Conference
Allergy, asthma and COPD - Breaking through barriers.
Device: start with possibilities instead of limitations
Date: 2-4 June, 2005
Venue: Mitland Hotel, Utrecht, the Netherlands
More information at www.efanet.org.

* ERS/ATS joint course on Basics in asthma
Date: June 8-10, 2005 
Place: Oslo, Norway
For more information click on www.ersnet.org

* The 10th Annual Meeting of the Global Alliance for Medical Education
Date:June 19-21, 2005
Place: The Westin New York at Times Square
New York, NY
For Registration information contact Meghan Arnott
at marnott@medicallectures.com or click on the GAME website www.game-cme.org

* XVIII IFOS World Congress
International Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies
Date: 25 - 30 June, 2005
Place: Rome, Italy
For more information email to ifos2005@gruppotriumph.it

* XIX World Allergy Congress
Organised by World Allergy Organisation (WAO) and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)
Date: 26 June - 1st July, 2005
Place: Munich, Germany
Main Theme: Allergy in a Changing World
For more information click on www.congrex.com/wac2005 or contact wac2005@congrex.se .

* RSV 2005 Symposium
Date: September 15 – 18, 2005
Place: Keble College, Oxford, UK
Keydates:  May 9, 2005 – Early registration fee
May 9, 2005 – Young Investigator Award abstracts
May 9, 2005 – All abstracts due
July 25, 2005 – Late Breaker abstract deadline
September 5, 2005 – Final registration deadline
For the program, registration and more information click on  www.themacraegroup.com

* 4th Balkan Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Date: September 22-25, 2005
Place: Patriarchy Palace, Bucharest, Romania
For more information click on http://www.sraic.ro/congress/congress_en.html

* 2nd Croatian-Italian Symposium on Psoriasis
Date: 23-24 September 2005
Place: Naftalan, Ivanic Grad, Croatia
For more information email at naftalan@zg.htnet.hr or click on www.naftalan.nr

* VVM 2005, Viral Vaccine Meeting
Date: October 27 – 30, 2005
Place: Westin Palace, Madrid, Spain
For more information click on www.TheMacraeGroup.com

* International Cytokine Society Conference 2005
Cytokines, Immunity, Immunotherapy and Vaccine
Date: 27-31 October, 2005
Place: Lotte Hotel Jmasin, Seoul, Korea
More information at www.ics2005.org

* Joint Meeting of the Pediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the EAACI Section on Pediatrics
Date: November 12-15, 2005
Place: Prague, Chech Republic
More information on www.ers-eaaci2005.ch

* Iranian Asthma Meeting - Biennial Seminar of Iranian Society of Asthma & Allergy (ISAA)
Date: 14-16 November 2005
Place: Tehran, Iran

* Superantigens in Airway Diseases Symposium
Immunology and clinics of superantigen-driven inflammation
Date: November 25-26, 2005
Place: Hotel Novotel, Ghent, Belgium
More information on www.semico.be/superantigens2005/

* European Patient Conferece on Stem Cell Research: The Patient's Perpsective
Date: 15-16 December 2005
Place: The Charlemagne Building, Brussels, Belgium
More information on the website www.erastepps2005.eu.com/index.htm

122JMA Poster Session                                  


9th of May
19.30-21.30 in Hall 4/5
Chaired by S. Olsson, D. Metcalfe

 

Posters are exclusively presented by EAACI-JMAs in this session. Poster walks will be lead by a Junior and a senior chair-persons in an informal atmosphere. A light dinner buffet and wine are served.

Poster prizes will be awarded through the support of Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation and furthermore the recipients of the EAACI Fellowship Awards will be announced.

All JMAs are especially welcome to this session to discuss your work and ideas!

Abstracts

JMA FORUM

Bridging the Gap Between
Basic Research and Clinical Practice

Thursday 10th of May
12.45-13.45 in Hall 4/5
Chaired by N.G. Papadopoulos, S. Olsson

  • S. Bonini
    MDs vs PhDs : a changing pattern within the EAACI
  • S. Del Giacco
    Clinical thinking and basic ideas: Can they coincide?
  • Current controversies
    M. Leckie
    Are eosinophils involved in asthma?
    S. Salvi
    Is IgE crucial to allergy?
  • Round table discussion

Critical thinking development: Can one become wise early? 
With the participation of speakers, audience and specially invited discussants: P. van Cauwenberge, A. Frew, S. Holgate, SGO Johansson

The 2nd JMA Forum was realized during the Berlin meeting, making this event another JMA activity with a specific scope and repeatability. In these Forums, we intend to explore different educational aspects of our specialty.

In this respect, the idea for 2001, as presented by Nikos Papadopoulos and Susanna Olson that were chairing the Forum, was to look into contrasts between clinical perspectives and basic research ideas.

Pr. Sergio Bonini, the President of the EAACI, opened the meeting with an introductory talk on the changing balance between MDs and PhDs in the Academy. Initially, he said, there were no basic scientists, PhDs, within the EAACI members, as this was a purely medical society. However, this is changing as more scientists are interested in Allergy and more medical doctors are interested in basic research.

Pr. Sergio Del Giacco continued in analyzing the possibility for a physician to be able to achieve a 'scientific' way of thinking. His conclusion was that this is possible, however, there are several difficulties that have to be overpassed.

In the second part of the Forum, two young investigators gave interesting talks on currently controversial subjects, that challenge mainstream ideas. Maggie Leckie showed data that relate the eosinophil with asthma and referred to her much cited study on a anti-IL5 monoclonal antibody trial in humans, where although eosinophilia was significantly diminished, there were no effects on clinical parameters. Sundeep Salvi, presented a long list of evidence that contradict the traditional dependence of atopy on IgE.

Unfortunately, having to squeeze the Forum between two other sessions, time was very short for discussion. Pr. Tony Frew and Pr. Paul Van Cauwenberge closed the meeting, concluding that caution and insight are needed when interpreting data. The Forum successfully demonstrated that science is changing continuously and nothing is to be taken for granted!
Allergy in the European Union 6th
Framework Programme
Tuesday June 4, 11.00-12.30, Room Italia

Chairpersons:
Paul van Cauwenberge (BE), EAACI President
Susanna Olsson (SE), JMA Chairperson

  • Paul van Cauwenberge
    EAACI and EU Institutions
  • Barend Verachtert (BE)
    European Commission - Research Directorate-General: The European Research Programmes beyond 2002
  • Ted Popov (BG)
    Braveheart 2: EU grant application
  • Questions & Discussion

Click here to see the Photo Album from JMA Social Dinner.

Allergy in Different Organs - Eosinophils:
Hallmark or Epiphenomenon?
Monday June 3, 13.45-15.30

Chairpersons:
Ulrike RAAP (GE)) and Philippe GEVAERT (BE)

Place: Congress Centre Mediterraneo
Time: Saturday June 1 at 17.30-19.00

Hotel Ibis Porte de Clichy was specially reserved for JMAs. This is a nice middle class hotel with swimming pool located in Porte de Clichy and easily reached from the Congress by Metro. This common lodging will allow JMAs to meet more easily and to arrange social activities as well as facilitating common transports.
At the EAACI stand all JMAs were welcomed to meet up and use the computer with internet reserved for us.
Sunday June 8, 17.30-18.30, room 342B
Sunday June 8, 15.30-17.30, room 342B
Chairs: Katarina Bluemchen (GE) and Ulrike Raap (GE)
  • How to write a scientific paper
    Claus Bachert (BE)
  • How to write a grant application
    Sergio Bonini (IT)
  • Marie Curie Grant Programme
    Representative from the European Union
JMA Symposium (Main Symposium 3)
Molecular Control Mechanisms in Allergic Disease
Sunday June 8, 8.30-10.15, the Grand Amphithéâtre
Chair : Ioanna Agache and Bart N Lambrecht

Winners of Pharmacia Diagnostics Poster Prizes at the JMA Poster Session in Paris June 7, 2003

  • Dr. E. Untersmayr, University of Vienna , Austria
  • Dr. O. Palomares, University Complutense de Madrid , Spain
  • Dr. T. Saarne, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, Stockholm , Sweden
  • Dr. T. Cirkovic Velickovic, Fac. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Belgrade , Serbia-Montenegro
  • Dr. S.M. Reinartz, AMC, Amsterdam , The Netherlands
  • Dr. L.E. Chialda, University of Erlangen , Germany
  • Dr. B.N. Pereira, St Mary's Hospital, Newport , Isle of Wight , UK
  • Dr. C. Gore, Wythenshawe Hospital , Manchester , UK
  • Dr. E.U. Borzova, Russain Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Moscow , Russia
  • Dr. V. Mariani, Div. Of Environment and Allergy, Munich , Germany

Winners of the JMA best poster prize, ENT-EAACI meeting Ghent 2003

  • Dr. K. Gunhan, Celal Bayar University , Turkey
  • Dr. M. Gavrovic-Jankulovic, University of Belgrade , Serbia & Montenegro

Winners of the JMA best free paper prize, ENT-EAACI meeting Ghent 2003

  • Dr. J. Smit, Utrecht University , The Netherlands
  • Dr. M. Kupczyk, Medical University of Lodz , Poland
Saturday June 7, 18.30-20.30,
Salle Passy at level 1 in Palais des Congres


Chairs: Susanna Olsson (S) and Philippe Gevaert (BE)

The JMA Poster Session is now becoming a tradition and will be held on the first night of the congress in parallel with the Opening cocktail. This session is aimed to promote the work of the EAACI-JMAs in an informal atmosphere where contacts with senior experts as well as fellow JMAs are supported. Posters are exclusively presented by JMAs and poster prices sponsored by Pharmacia Diagnostics will be awarded for out standing abstracts and poster presentations.

*Allergens Section
JMA Chaiperson Susanna Olsson
*Asthma Section
JMA Chaiperson Bart Lambrecht
*Dermatology Section
JMA Chaiperson Ulrike Raap
*Immunotherapy and Allergy Diagnosis Section
JMA Chaiperson Stefano Del Giacco
*Food Allergy Section
JMA Chaiperson Ioana Agache-Brumaru
*Inflammation of Upper Airways Section
JMA Chaiperson Philippe Gevaert
*Mechanisms of Inflammation Section
JMA Chairperson Peter Hellings
*Paediatric Allergy Section
JMA Chairperson Katarina Bluemchen

* EAACI Immunology Section and SIAF Symposium
Place: Davos, Switzerland
Date: 9th January 2004
Main Theme: Immune Mechanisms of Allergy

* Allergy and Eczema
A CME Accreditation Event in cooperation with ACAAI in Milan, 23rd - 24th January, 2004.
Main theme: Adverse reactions to food proteins, the changing patterns, the mechanisms and the teatment.
For further Information click on the website
www.mcaevents.org

* 4th World Asthma Meeting
Place: Bangkok, Thailand
Date: 16th -19th February 2004
Main theme: Asthma: A World-Wide Approach to Understanding, Treatment and Prevention
For more information click on the website www.WAM2004.com

* International Primary Care Respiratory Group - 2nd World Conference
Place: Melbourne, Australia
Date: 19th - 22nd February 2004
For more information click on the website
www.theipcrg.org

* 6th International Congress of Pediatric Pulmonology
Place: Lisbon Congress Centre, Portugal
Date: February 28th - March 2nd 2004
For more information on the Congress and the programme click on the website: www.cipp-meeting.com/CIPP6/

* 9th International Symposium on Immunological, Chemical and Clinical Problems of Food Allergy
Place: Budapest, Hungary
Date: 18th - 21st April 2004
Details of preliminary programme, abstract submission, exhibition, registration procedures and accommodations available at the website: www.foodallergy.makit.hu

* Basic and Clinical Allergy
18th course in the series
Place: London
Date: 19th - 22nd April, 2004
For further information click on the website: www.med.ic.ac.uk/divisions/49a/mtgs.htm

* 1st Drug Hypersensitivity Meeting
Place: Bellevue Palace, Bern, Switzerland
Date:  5th - 8th May, 2004
For more information click on the website
www.drughypersensitivity.ch

* 9th EFA Conference
Place: Oslo, Norway
Date: 24-26 June, 2004
Main Theme: Asthma and COPD:The Patient's Perspective
For more information click on www.efanet.org or contact hk.be@lhl.no

* Krakow Conference
Place: Krakow, Polland
Date: July 31st - August 3rd, 2004
Theme: Present and Future Developments on Allergy & Immunology
For more information click on the website www.pta.med.pl/krakow2004/index.php

* ERS Annual Congres
Place: Glasgow, U.K
Date: 4-8 September 2004
For more information click on www.ersnet.org or contact info@ersnet.org.

* Allergy Congress 2004
Place: Aachen, Germany
Date: 15th-19 September, 2004
For more information click on www.allergie-kongress-2004.de/.

* 2nd International Consesus on Urticaria
Place: Berlin, Germany
Date:1-2 October 2004
Main theme: Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, Quality of Life, Diagnosis and Treatment
For more information click on www.ecarf.org.

* XII. Turkish National Congress of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Place: Antalya, Turkey
Date:  6th - 10th October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.allerji.kongresi.info

* Annual Conference of the Romanian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
Place: Brasov, Romania
Date:  7th - 9th October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.rsaci.3x.ro

* 3rd Slovenian Congress of Pneumology and Allergology
2nd Slovenian Immunology Congress-Immunology and Clinics IV:1st Slovenian Congress of Respiratory Nursing
Place: PORTORO, SLOVENIA, Grand hotel Emona
Date:  20th - 22nd October, 2004
For more information click on the website:
www.klinika-golnik.si

* American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
Annual Meeting
Date: 12-17 November 2004
Place: Boston, USA
For more information contact diannekubis@acaai.org or click on the website www.acaai.org/annual.html.

* Interasma - EAACI Asthma Section Joint Meeting
Date: 27 - 30 November 2004
Place: Bilbao, Spain
Main Theme: Asthma and Rhinitis: from guidelines to patient´s care
For more information click on www.interasma.org/bilbao2004

* Recent Advances in Asthma
Turkish Thoracic Society
Date: 2 - 4 December 2004
Place: Istanbul, Turkey
For more information click on www.toraks.org.tr

* XVII World Asthma Congress
Place: St. Petersburg, Russia
Date: July 5-8,2003
Main theme
Asthma: From Genes to Clinical Management

* World Allergy Organisation Congress-IXVIII ICACI
Place: Vancouver, Canada
Date: 7-12 September, 2003
For more information click on the website www.worldallergy.org

* III Balcan Congress of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
XI.Turkish Congress of National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Place: Istanbul
Date: 11-14 October 2003
For more information click on the website www.tnsaci.org

* EAACI Section on Pediatrics Symposium
Main theme: ''Advances in Pediatric Allergy''
Date: 14-15 November 2003
Place: Gevena Switzerland
For more information click on the website
www.sp-eaaci2003.ch

* EAACI and Section ENT Meeting
An event of Allergy Week in Ghent 2003
Place: Ghent, Belgium
Date: 15-18 November 2003
For more information click on the website www.semico.org
Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1. Atopic dermatitis (AD) : inflammatory disease of the epithelial barrier
2. The role of immunosuppressive agents in AD treatment
3. Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) in the elderly
4. Crenotherapy and Chronic Rhinosinusitis in children
5. Football and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction/Asthma (EIB)


1.    Atopic dermatitis (AD) : inflammatory disease of the epithelial barrier

Theme: physiopathology, eczema
Key words: atopic dermatitis, epithelial barrier, atopic pathway, filaggrin

The French Academie Nationale de Medecine has just allotted a session to this theme under the guidance of J.Bazex and M.Bagot, and two reports were presented : Alain Taieb (Bordeaux) on AD physiopathology and Y. de Prost (Paris-Necker) on  immunosuppressive treatments.
We know that AD is very common in industrialised countries and affects approximately 15 to 30% of children and 2 to 10% of adults. The immunologic vision considers it as the 1st stage of the atopic pathway followed by asthma, rhinitis and food allergy. And yet, the discovery of mutations in the Filaggrin gene (FLG), a major protein in the maturation of the stratum corneum, has refocused attention on skin and, as A.Taieb underlines, has produced a Copernician revolution in the understanding of the affection which appears to be a model of inflammatory disease of the epithelial barrier (ANM Bulletin 2012, in press).

Irvine and Mac Lean’s experimental works have indeed shown that FLG-lacking mice have a thin, dry and porous skin, and that the gene mutations and lack of FLG in children are associated with a severe form of eczema. Moreover, although FLG has no expression in the lungs, it was observed with surprise that some of its mutations were strongly associated with asthma and others with peanut allergy. Simultaneously, the Holgate team from Southampton underlines the frailty of the bronchial epithelium in asthmatic patient whose mucous membrane is poor at self-repair after aggression. Such epithelial deficiency also affects nasal mucosa (hence the risk of rhinitis) and intestinal mucosa, (hence  food allergy).

But dermatologists go even further, for skin appears no longer to be a simple mechanical barrier but an agent of immunity, as keratocytes secrete cytokines which play a part in the atopic path. The search is therefore on-going for molecules capable of stimulating the production of FLG, while avoiding or by-passing mutations: such is the case of  gentamicin or growth factors like the Keratocyte Growth Factor, which is present in skin and intestinal mucosa and which reduces inflammation and epithelium leakiness of the airways in rats.


2.    The role of immunosuppressive agents in AD treatment

Theme: eczema, treatment
Key words: eczema, atopic dermatitis, immunosuppressive agents, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, cyclosporine, biotherapies

Y. de Prost, whose great experience must not be overlooked, believes that the severe AD, in the form of impetigo and intense pruritus alter the quality of life ; they constitute 13 to 20% of cases in children and 15% in adults (an extreme form was observed in a 91-year old female patient). He gives a reminder of the treatment basics, i.e. dermocorticoids, limiting of infection and xerosis (emollients) and hygiene advice.

The most frequently used immunosuppressives (IS), when classic treatment fails and even for local medium or moderately intense affections, are Tacrolimus T (Protopic®) 0.1% and 0.03% ointment for children and Pimecrolimus P (Elidel), not  yet on sale in France, equally effective and acting as calcineurin inhibitors.

T, particularly recommended in the zones where corticoids should be avoided, such as the face, eyelids, buttocks and deep folds in adolescents, is extremely effective and well-tolerated apart from some local irritation in the 3 days following its application; 6 weeks of treatment is advised. The only counter-indications are herpes and exposure to the sun. The risks of Carcinogenesis (Lymphomas), which were evoked when T was administered in case of organ grafts, are not confirmed for local short-term treatment.

P offers the same indications and results as T.

As for per os IS, these are mainly represented in France by cyclosporine (4 to 5 mg/day), clearly effective but requiring careful monitoring of kidney function and blood pressure, and gradual reduction in dosage before the end of treatment to avoid rebound occurrences.

Methotrexate has also been suggested when cyclosporine is ineffective.

Finally, biotherapies : Omalizumab or Retuximab have shown interesting therapeutic test results, but a larger number of patients is necessary to confirm their possible efficiency and justify their high costs.


3.    Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) in the elderly

Theme: ENT allergy, immunologic markers
Key words: rhino-sinusitis, elderly patients, nasal polyps

The physiopathology of CRS, little studied in elderly subjects, is the theme of the following article (S.H.Cho et al  JACI 2012 129  3 858-860 e2). The US-Korean authors distinguish two types : 1°) CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP), polarised toward a Th1-type immunologic reaction, and 2°) CRS without NPs, with eosinophilia and tendency to Th2 skewing, and point to the increasing evidence that these are linked to impairment of the barrier function of the airway mucosal epithelium 

The aim of the study was to evaluate the age-related differences in the clinical characteristics and to assess the respective immunologic markers.

A 1st retrospective study of 252 patients led to identification of a lot of demographic and clinical characteristics, by subdividing the group into adults (230 aged 16-49) and the elderly (22 aged 60-77). In the latter, asthma and associated NPs tended to be more frequent, but with no statistical significance; only the sinus opacification score, assessed by tomography and CRS severity marker, was statistically higher.

In a 2nd stage, in different subject groups (58 with NPs, 51 without NPs, and 50 control, with the same age range), they went further and studied nasal lavages and immunologic markers. Among them, ECP (Eosinophil Cationic Protein) blood counts were higher, above all in adults with NPs than in elderly subjects, a sign that the eosinophilic inflammation was lower in the latter. However, the neutrophilic inflammation detected by HNE (Human Neutrophil Elastase) was not discriminated by age or by CRS type.

As for markers of the epidermal differentiation complex, S100 A7 (psoriasin) and S100 8/9 (calprotectin), levels of which are generally reduced in CRS, were significantly lower in elderly subjects, above all for calprotectin in CRSwNP.

On the whole, and despite the skew toward severity and more frequent association with NPs, CRS eosinophilic inflammation subsides with age, whereas simultaneously the epithelial barrier dysfunction, as revealed by the lower levels of corresponding markers and above all of S100 A8/9, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lesions and therefore indicates a need to develop modified treatment strategies for elderly patients with CRS.


4.    Crenotherapy and Chronic Rhinosinusitis in children

Theme: ORL allergy, nasal  thermal aerosol
Key words: crenotherapy, rhino-sinusitis, child, inflammation markers

Thermalism for treating allergic or non-allergic rhinosinusitis, which had its golden age in France in the past century, has been more or less dropped over the past years. But a recent article by Italian authors published in English (A.Passariello et al :American Journal of Rhinology &Allergy  January-February 2012  26  1 15e-19e), based on precise clinical, biological and statistical studies, now rehabilitates this treatment by the inhalation of sulphate-sodium chloride water from a thermal site in the island of Ischia.

65 children of an average 3.3 years of age received thermal aerosol inhalations for 15 days and 15 minutes per day. A complete preliminary ENT check up with sino-nasal severity score and sampling of nasal mucus by lavage, was performed with quantitative determination of inflammation markers such as TNFα, and immune-regulator anti-microbial peptides such as calprotectin and Hβ2 defensin. 60 other healthy children from a paediatrics ward were used as controls. All these parameters were compared in a thorough statistical study.

At the end of the treatment a marked improvement in symptoms (essentially nasal obstruction, and impairment of the sense of smell) and in the sino-nasal score was observed with significant values, whereas levels of calprotectin TNFα and Hβd-2 were also reduced in statistically significant proportions.

Crenotherapy is thus now taking on a new dimension, for it has already long been recognised as harmless, well accepted and perfectly tolerated, as well as an alternative to drug-based treatment. From now on it also appears as an inhibitor of cytokines and nasal inflammatory mediators.

Admittedly, one can be surprised, just as the authors were, to note a difference between the observations made in adults with CRSwNP for whom, as already said above, calprotectin and Hβd-2 levels are lower than controls. But in this study carried out with children, CRS is not associated with polyps or with eosinophilia, but rather with a mixed inflammatory cell population composed of lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils, which could account for a difference in the occurrence mechanism of lesions.

In any case and despite the absence in this study of an accurate allergist check-up (one single note pointing out the regression of allergic symptoms), the thermal treatment of chronic rhinitis in children, which was very fashionable a few decades ago, deserves to be  taken once again into consideration


5.    Football and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction/Asthma (EIB)

Theme: asthma
Key words: exercise-induced asthma, football, bronchial provocation, bronchial dilatation, doping

The diagnosis of asthma or Exercise-Induced Broncho-constriction (EIB), which is well-known in sportspeople, relies heavily on athletes’ statements and is treated by bronchodilators or even corticosteroids, which are then authorised in high level sports competitions. Football, the most popular sport around the world, exposes its players to many factors of aggression: prolonged hyperpnoea causing loss of water, exposure to multiple and irritating aero-allergens during training or competition (10 to 13km run during each match, on grass or in cold weather).

Now, following a series of doping incidents with elite athletes in 2009, a change in the regulations of international competitions such as the Olympics Games for instance, allows the use of sympathomimetic or anti-asthma drugs, on condition that this is justified by a confirmed diagnosis after accurate pulmonary function testing.

A group of British authors from Newcastle, Liverpool and London (Ansley et al Allergy 2012 March  67 3 390-395) thus interviewed and examined 65 elite professional soccer players (English Premier League) thought to be suffering from EIB, in order to check the accuracy of the diagnosis.

They recorded by questionnaire the symptoms and the drugs used and conducted a bronchial provocation test with dry air (6 minutes of eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea) in 42 players, and a mannitol challenge in 18 players. Five players with abnormal resting spirometry underwent a bronchodilator test. The results were surprising : in fact, of the 65 players assessed, 57 (88%) indicated regular use of asthma medication and 57 (88%) indicated EIB symptoms during a match. And yet only 33 (51%) had a positive bronchodilator or bronchial provocation test. Moreover neither symptoms nor the use of inhaled corticosteroids were predictive of the outcome of pulmonary function tests.

Thus, a high proportion of English elite professional soccer players are wrongly medicated for asthma, some of them using as reliever therapy only, while they present neither bronchial obstruction nor hyper-responsiveness to possible environmental stimuli.

This is an important piece of information which should be brought to the attention of sports authorities and all Olympic sports teams. It once more underlines the fair play of the British medical and sporting community.


-----
Comments and questions welcome :

Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
*claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr
**j.gayraud@orange.fr


Centre for Immune Regulation (CIR) is a research centre established as a Centre of Excellence by the Research Council of Norway at the University of Oslo and the Oslo University Hospital. CIR is also a FOCIS (Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies) Center of Excellence. Our scientific goal is to identify and investigate mechanisms of immune dysregulation that contribute to allergic and autoimmune disease in order to advance the development of therapeutics. CIR consists of five research groups and approximately 100 people. The research environment is very dynamic and there is extensive interaction between the groups. CIR has an educational program which includes seminar series and invited internationally renowned guest professors. For more information, see http://www.med.uio.no/cir/english/.

Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1. Allergic reactions of medical personnel to allergen extracts
2. Cold Urticaria (CU) : immuno-genetic and molecular data
3. Allergic consequences of climate changes
4. Risks of childhood allergy and asthma under phthalate exposure
5. Sputum eosinophilia and asthma (A)


1.  Allergic reactions of medical personnel to allergen extracts

Theme: allergens
Key words: medical staff – allergen extracts – beta blocking agent – timothy grass – pollens – pets

A rare case of occupational anaphylaxis, is reported by two US authors in a 32-year-old female compounding technician  while preparing an immunotherapy vial of timothy grass allergen extracts, who accidentally stuck herself on the hand with a needle (M.L Bandino et M.S.Tankersley JACI  2012 129 1 250-251). Within minutes, a local wheal-and -flare response appeared at the needle-stick site followed by rhino-conjunctivitis, diffuse urticaria, then a facial peri-orbital and tongue angio-oedema, requiring several adrenaline injections before stabilising. Admittedly, this woman was atopic, suffering from allergic rhinitis, which included sensitization to timothy grass, but usually treated by Loratadine®, and also from a regular hypertension by a β-blocking agent (Atenolol®), regarded as risk- factor of resistance to treatment.

Commenting on this observation, the Danish author S.Dreborg (JACI 2012 129 in press) reminds us that this type of risk can concern all medical staff. He quotes the case of a nurse, assigned to work on allergenic provocative tests in a Paediatrics hospital unit, with no allergy history, who started coughing the following winter, then as soon as she resumed work and undertook a 1st provocative test, had an asthma attack followed, despite having stopped working,  by a  rhino-conjunctivitis,.

In 1970 in Sweden, 18 out of 20 paediatric allergy nurses showed signs of sensitization, despite installation of an air extraction system. A nurses’ Union sent a web- questionnaire to 570 participants on the subject of allergic risks at work, and received 418 (71%) answers. Conducting skin tests (prick-tests, scarification or ID) was judged as responsible, but fingers were also pointed at immunotherapy and inhaled provocative tests. Allergens most frequently implicated were pollens and pets.

The authors set forth a series of recommendations on the training and careful handling of allergenic extracts, which they intend to submit to ad hoc Committees. A similar initiative in France and French-speaking countries, in the form of a Forum aimed at gathering similar observations would be welcome.


2.  Cold Urticaria (CU) : immuno-genetic and molecular data

Theme: skin allergy
Key words: cold urticaria – Ig deficiency – repeated infections – auto immunity – gene PLCG2 – phospholipase

CU is a diagnosis that allergists may be confronted by, atopy being not excluded from its pathogenesis. It is also due to mast cell degranulation by cold temperatures, and can culminate in anaphylaxis.

In an article dedicated to an inherited CU associated with antibody deficiency and auto-immunity (M.J.Ombrello et al NEJM 2012 January 12 330-338) a group of US researchers undertook a large number of immunologic and genetic investigations with 27 subjects belonging to three families  of European ancestry.

From a clinical point of view, every subject’s CU began in childhood and continued throughout their life. But it is not the contact with cold that triggers CU (ice-cube tests were negative as well as cold water immersion) but essentially cold air or wind. 15 subjects out of 26 also showed allergic manifestations.

26 out of 27 suffered from immunologic disorders: in 75% of cases a deficiency in immunoglobulins, associated  in 56% with susceptibility to sinus and lung infections. Signs of auto-immunity were also observed (auto-antibodies or associated auto-immune disease : granulomatous rash, vitiligo, inflammatory arthritis, thyroiditis, granulomatous lesion of larynx and soft palate).

Common lab tests showed reduced IgA and IgM serum levels, circulating natural killer cells and B lymphocytes, but higher IgE levels. In 13 of 21 treated subjects (62%) antinuclear antibodies were found.

From the genetic point of view, DNA sequencing, particularly through the Sanger enzymatic technique and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) showed some deletions in gene PLCG2 encoding phospholipase-active proteins, particularly PLCγ2 , signaling molecule expressed in many cells such as mast cells, B lymphocytes and natural killer.

This genetic research highlights the importance of molecular mechanisms contributing to the defence of the organism and immune tolerance.

The possible treatment of CU clinical manifestations by phospholipase inhibitors is a current subject of research and a possible example of targeted molecular pharmacology. The administration of immunoglobulins IV may be useful in some cases, but prescribing them in France is currently regulated.


3.  Allergic consequences of climate changes

Theme: allergy and environment
Key words: global warming – CO2 – tree pollens – grass – Ambrosia - Alternaria

A series of publications on the health impact of climate changes and global warming in the years to come ( L.Ziska et al: Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA and JACI 2012  1 29 27-32) reveals that atmospheric gas accumulation, particularly CO2, influences photosynthesis and plant growth. This slogan sums up the consequences: “More sneezing in a warmer world”. Three types of plants are concerned: trees in spring, grass in summer and Ambrosias (ragweed) in autumn.

Tree flowering is now 2 to 4 weeks earlier, whether it be oaks or birches in the USA but also in Europe (Swiss and Denmark), and 1-3 weeks earlier for olive trees in Spain.

The same can be said of grass, whose pollen counts have increased as well as their allergenic protein contents, particularly for the US Artemisia and the European species Pellitory (Parietaria Officinalis). However, there is not always a direct relationship between atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and increased allergenic effect of these pollens.

However for Ambrosia (ragweed) there is a clinical and experimental impact of CO2 and T° on pollen allergenicity, proved by the authors,. They also remind us of importance of latitude, after having observed a 27-day lengthening in the pollen season over 15 years in some parts of northern USA, ending on a humoristic note when they recommend that Canadians should stock up on handkerchiefs for the years to come.

Finally, even molds are concerned by these climate changes. Such is the case of Alternaria whose sporulation has increased.

Thus, climate changes induce a higher exposition to allergens, in theory more so in the countryside than in towns. However, the role of gas (NO2 and Ozone) and particle pollutants (PM2,5) on respiratory mucous as well as pollen biology is, in large cities of the Western world, an exacerbation factor to allergy symptoms. Finally, let us recall that this anthropogenic accumulation of atmospheric gases also account for extreme climate events such as heavy rainfalls and thunderstorms; the latter were the cause of acute and spectacular episodes of rhinitis and asthma in Europe.
These notions should be kept in mind, if only for setting up the sequencing of preventive treatments (immunotherapy) of our allergic patients.


4.  Risks of childhood allergy and asthma under phthalate exposure

Theme: asthma - allergens
Key words: asthma – phtalates – benzyl-butyl-phtalate

Phtalates (Pht) are indoor pollutants emitted by everyday consumer goods, such as food packaging, plastic components, medical equipment (tubes and perfusion bags), toys, and cosmetics. They are often considered as endocrine disruptors impacting reproductive functions, and carcinogenic. A group of Chinese authors from Taiwan, having assumed the allergenic effect of these Pht, the degree of exposure to which can be measured by their metabolites in blood and urine, conducted a case control study of 101 pre-school children (2-6 years of age) selected between 2007 and 2009 in a population of several thousand.

A considerable amount of data was collected from parental questionnaires, daily monitoring of clinical symptoms, specific and total IgE levels, concentration of various indoor pollutants in patients’ homes, including 5 Phts in dust samples, and concomitant analysis of urine metabolites as well as creatinine concentration. The data were then subjected to statistical analysis.

Apart from the higher percentage of boys in the test group than in the control one, demographic, family, and environmental characteristics were almost identical in both groups, albeit with a higher percentage of atopic subjects in the 1st group.

Essentially, it appeared that high levels of benzyl-butyl-phtalate (BBzP) in home dust are significantly associated with cases of allergic manifestations (rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma or dermatitis) whereas its urine metabolite, mono-benzyl-phtalate (MBzP), was higher in asthmatics than in controls.
Overall, high levels of DBP (dibutyl-phtalate) and its metabolites MBP (mono-n-butyl-phtalate) and MEHP (mono-2-ethylhexyl-phtalate) may be regarded as risk factors for clinical manifestations concerning lung, skin or eyes.
Admittedly Phts, whose concentrations in urine were lower than in dust, are not the only culprits for poor quality indoor air (an important role is also played by exposure to fungus) but their contribution remains notable and for the first time quantitatively assessed, and particularly for BBzP


5.  Sputum eosinophilia and asthma (A)

Theme: asthma
Key words: sputum eosinophilia – asthma – blood eosinophilia - FENO

Having observed that a subgroup of asthmatics did not have airway eosinophilia, which it is regarded as asthma-typical, the NIH Californian authors ( K.W.Mc Grath  AJRCCM 2012 20 January  in press) wanted to determine the size and characteristics of this group, through repeatedly analysing the cytology data from these patients’ sputum.

995 asthmatics, aged 12-70, suffering from mild-to-moderate asthma and belonging to 9 different national cohorts, underwent repeated sputum induction, with the usual technique (2 to 4 times) followed by cytology examination in search of eosinophils (EO). The positivity threshold was fixed at 2% or more of the number of cells.

Three groups of subjects were discriminated : Asthmatics (A) with persistent EO, those with intermittent EO (at least once) and those who were consistently negative. Comparing cytological tests to blood eosinophilia or to FENO did not show any reliable sensitivity or specificity.

645 A. followed standard inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), 350 did not. The first statistical analyses reveal that 83% ICS have no sputum EO and 36% of the non ICs. Which constitutes a large group of non-eosinophilic asthmatics. This absence of EO was observed even in A whose disease was well-controlled.

From a therapeutic point of view, eosinophilic A. reacted favourably to 2 weeks of anti-inflammatory treatment (IC + anti-leukotriene Zafirlukast) with an improvement in airflow obstruction. This was not the case for non-eosinophilic A in whom only albuterol (β2 agonist) induced bronchodilation.

On the whole, more than half the patients with mild-to-moderate asthma showed a persistent absence of sputum eosinophils.

Among the different clinical forms of A., this group definitely represents a particular phenotype which responds only poorly to anti-inflammatory therapy.
Practically, this research should incite us to look more frequently for EO in our asthmatic patients’ sputum.

NB : As part of a general bibliography, our readers are encouraged to look at the special issue of Nature (Outlook 24 Nov 2011 479 7374) which presents a 27 page exclusive paper on Allergies.

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Comments and questions welcome:

Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
*claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr **j.gayraud@orange.fr
For a term of two years, the duties of coordinator include:

• Responsible for the organisation and chairing of 3-4 SPC meetings and also telephone conferences.
• Oversee the compilation of the Congress Preliminary Programme, the final Congress Programme book and abstract handling.
• Chair the abstract selection procedure, and keeping scientific, topical and geographical balance in the congress scientific programme.
BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES IN ALLERGOLOGY


To our readers
Dear Colleagues,
At the dawn of this new year, we would like both to receive your opinions and to inform you of our motivations and thoughts as to our goals relating to ongoing professional training in Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

As you know, what we have in mind, so as to keep in line with the spirit which has guided the CEFCAP (Comite Europeen de Formation Continue pour Allergologues Praticiens) founders, and particularly our dear friend and late colleague Franz Marrache, is to give priority, in our scientific paper abstracts, to those with the most practical conclusions and the highest quality of methodology. Indeed, in this time of globalisation, the number of publications is growing exponentially.

But at the same time, scientists in many emerging or developing countries are accessing to new technologies and providing us with very high quality papers. Just to quote a few among the latest, documents from Morocco, China (Taiwan), Slovenia have joined the many Anglo-American and European publications which form our basic resources. And, of course, nearly all of them are in English, even those coming from France : it is the condition for worldwide identification.

Our aim is also to make them easier to understand for our French and French-speaking colleagues. Reading the abstracts alone, could lead to errors and misunderstandings; the full-text must be read to assess the quality of the research undertaken, its limits and weak points. That is why our BUAs (Bibliographic Updates in Allergy) which the EAACI publishes regularly each month, are not a simple transfer of the original abstracts but include all the comments and details added by us. Each month we glance at around thirty reviews, specialized in Allergy (Respiratory, Skin, ENT,…) and  Clinical Immunology concerning Adults and Children and also covering Internal Medicine. Each month we pick out the 4 or 5 most striking and most original articles, across all various themes.

In 2012, we would like to reward your efforts by crediting your regular reading of these ABA/BUA with some CME points. For this, each ABA/BUA will be accompanied each month by an multiple choice questionnaire in order to evaluate the knowledge acquired through reading.

If this experiment passes the test of method assessment by a sample of our readers, it will then be submitted to EBAACI (European Board of Accreditation in Allergy & Clinical Immunology) for validation. We will keep you informed of each step of this project.

To conclude, we would like to thank you retrospectively for your loyalty and in advance for your comments, and we also would like to thank all those who, in France and in Europe at large, participate in our initiatives : the Syndicat des Allergologues (Allergist Union) and Dr Madeleine Epstein who has for many years been in charge of publishing our texts, the Library teams of the Academie Nationale de Medecine and the Paris-Descartes Inter-University Library who are so helpful in our research, as well as Dr Taborda ,then Bernard and Sue Prefol who translate our French ABAs into English BUAs, and Dr Chrysanthi Skevaki who has opened the doors of the EAACI web site to us. Thank you all, and our very best wishes for 2012.

Claude Molina


Jacques Gayraud






1.    Preventive Inhaled Corticotherapy (IC) with pre-school children at high risk for asthma
2.    Monitoring honeybee venom immunotherapy with the Basophil Activation Test (BAT)
3.    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) and atopy.
4.    Adrenaline auto-injection by children and teenagers
5.    Particularities of severe asthma (SA)



1.    Preventive Inhaled Corticotherapy (IC) with pre-school children at high risk for asthma

Theme:
paediatric allergy, asthma
Key words: preventive Inhaled Corticotherapy (IC) – Low-dose daily IC – High-dose intermittent IC – Frequency of exacerbations – Oral corticotherapy

A US paediatrician multicentre study led by the California Allergy Department (R.S Zeiger NEJM 2011 365 1990-2001) was conducted among pre-school children considered at high-risk for asthma, in relation to a predictive index based on the frequency of wheezing and/or hospitalisations in the past year. The official recommendation in these cases was the use of IC, at varied doses but daily and for a long period. The major drawback observed was retarded growth and parents’ reluctance concerning continuous treatment. As a result the authors undertook a new randomised study comparing the benefits of a daily low-dose regimen to an intermittent high-dose.

Thus, 278 children aged 12 months to 5 years, enrolled in 7 different US centres, following an ethically validated protocol, received for 1 year either a nightly dose of 0.5mg IC (Pulmicort® in an inhalation suspension) or a 1mg twice-daily dose, from the onset of respiratory symptoms and for periods of an average 7 days. (Note : the protocol also included the on-demand addition of a bronchodilator, Albuterol, similar to Salbutamol® for 48hrs). The primary objective was the decreased frequency of exacerbations requiring oral glucocorticoid therapy.

At the end of the study, there appears no statistically significant difference between the two regimens, both equally efficient in the prevention of exacerbations and other symptoms (side effects or others). However, there is a notable reduction in the exposure to glucocorticoids (104mg over 1 year) in the intermittent as compared to the daily regimen, which is not negligible for young children in full growth.

As a conclusion, the authors recommend the intermittent rather than the daily regimen, something that clinical common sense could predict, but which from now on is supported by a precise statistical study and a clear protocol.


2.    Monitoring honeybee venom immunotherapy with the Basophil Activation Test (BAT)

Theme: allergy to insect venom
Key words: immunotherapy – honeybee venom – rush treatment – specific IgEs – IgG4

31 Slovenian children with a history of honeybee venom-induced anaphylaxis were submitted to a specific, rush- immunotherapy , in a single-blind prospective study, monitored  through the new Basophil Activation Test (S.E.K Zitnik et al Pediatr.Allergy&Immunol 2011, early view). This test is based on the biology of basophil cells whose degranulation is quantified by the expression of the CD63 marker and gauged by flow cytometry followed by fluorescent staining. Indeed, in non-active basophils, CD63 is strictly localised inside the granules, then, at the time of exocytosis and fusion with the cell membrane, transferred to the cell surface and measured through venom concentration.
BAT results are considered positive when CD63 gives a positive reaction in at least 15% of basophils, for 1µg/ml of venom. Moreover there exists a correlation between CD63 positivity and histamine liberation. The test was applied before starting the treatment, 5 days later and after 6 months or even 2-4 years in some subjects.

Before treatment, the BAT helped identify the culprit insect in 74% of the cases, while specific IgE reactivity was only observed in 52% of the children. Five days later, i.e. at the end of the rush-treatment, there is no statistically notable BAT modification.

However, after 6 months of regular immunotherapy (100µg every 4 weeks) specific IgEs remain at comparable levels (22.8kU/l on average, with a maximum of 100kU/l) whereas IgG4 levels are significantly higher. As for the BAT, it revealed in 85% of the children a marked CD63 decrease in the presence of 0.1µg/ml allergen (limit of cellular sensitivity) four times lower than at the start of treatment. The same observation is made after 2-4 years, whereas specific IgEs levels are also now significantly reduced.

In addition the authors observed that, during rush-treatment, BAT positivity was associated with the appearance of side effects.

In conclusion, the Slovenian authors recommend the BAT as a reliable monitoring method of hymenopterous insect immunotherapy. Senior French-speaking allergists will certainly rejoice in the rehabilitation and renovation of the basophil degranulation test, much favoured by our late colleague J.Benvesiste : it was known as the TDBH (Test de Degranulation des Basophiles Humains)


3.    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) and atopy.

Theme: atopy
Key words: Type 1 diabetes – Atopy – atopic dermatitis – Allergic rhino-conjunctivitis – Th1/Th2 balance

On a schematic point of view, T1D is controlled by the Th1-type immune response whereas atopy is considered as dependent on Th2-type immunity. Early studies had suggested an inverse association between T1D and allergic diseases. The Danish authors (S.F.Thomsen et al. Allergy 2011 66 645-647) therefore undertook a retrospective study of the association in a population of twins. They sent a questionnaire to 54,530 Danes, mono or dizygous, aged 3-71, having suffered from asthma, hay fever or atopic dermatitis, and who had been treated or hospitalised for T1D between 1931 and 2000.
After statistical crossing and adjusting for age, sex, and zygosity (96% confirmed), it appears that in the 3-20 year groups there exists an inverse association between T1D and the 3 symptoms of atopy (asthma, rhinitis, dermatitis) but only statistically significant for atopic dermatitis (AD). This AD risk is indeed 4 times lower in type-1 diabetics when compared to non-diabetics. Finally, with the dizygous T1D subjects (except for 91 pairs of twins) there is always a statistically lower risk than with their non-diabetic twin.
As to the genetic factors responsible for susceptibility to T1D or AD, they are also negatively correlated. For the authors, these findings substantiate the T1D/AD antagonism and the Th1/Th2 dichotomy.

This article was contested by an Italian group (Tosca et al. Allergy 2011 1612-14) who, in a prospective study of 112 children, aged 11 on average and suffering from T1D, on the other hand observed a positive correlation between this affection and allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. Besides, within the framework of the ISAAC epidemiologic study – which compares the incidence of T1D in the preceding 12 months in a group of 12-14 children from 31 countries, and the prevalence of atopic diseases – the authors (P.Fsadni et al Clin Resp.J 2012 6 18-25) also observe a positive T1D/AD correlation but no correlation at all with rhino-conjunctivitis.

It is clear that these conflicting findings can be explained by differences in methods of research, and also by the probable role of environmental factors. Whatever the case, these reports do not particularly affect diabetes or allergy therapies, but fuel the classical Th1/Th2 paradigm .


4.    Adrenaline auto-injection by children and teenagers

Theme: anti-allergy treatment
Key words: auto-injectable adrenaline – anaphylaxis – food allergy

Although adrenaline is unanimously recommended for first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis, its use in autoinjectors continues to be a subject of discussion as to its indications and practical implementation.

That is why a group of English allergists (L.Noimark et al Clin.&Exp. Allergy  2011 early view  1-9) undertook a multicentre prospective study involving 14 paediatric hospitals spread throughout the United Kingdom.
In this study 969 patients, aged 4-18 (average age 8), for whom an adrenaline autoinjector had been prescribed for a previous anaphylactic episode or food allergy the year before  answered a validated questionnaire.
503 of them had no new reaction and did not use adrenaline. 466 had an another allergic reaction, 221 a serious but non-anaphylactic episode, and 245 an anaphylactic shock (A) defined in the protocol as : loss of conscience, dysphagia, feeling of imminent fainting, wheezing, dyspnea, hoarseness. Among them, 97 even suffered 2, 3 or 4 episodes in the year. Most of the time and by order of frequency, the responsible allergens were peanuts and nuts, egg, milk, shellfish. As for the most frequent symptoms of these allergic reactions, they were : urticaria, skin redness, oedema, and wheezing.

Statistically speaking, in a united or multi-varied model, apart from the symptoms mentioned, oedema, throat prickling and stomach ache are associated with A. while A. risk factors are : a previous episode by non-identified allergen, milk cow allergy, ethnicity (non-whites) and associated asthma.
Most allergic reactions were treated by oral anti-histamines (83.3% for A, 86.4% for others, P=0.3). Finally, out of the 245 As., only 41 did receive adrenaline (16.7%, 95% CI :11.7-21.3), either by their parents or by a health professional and 2.4% by the patient himself. 13 patients who used their autoinjector needed another dose of adrenaline. The reason for not using autoinjectors were : 54.4% because it was not considered necessary and 19.1% probably not useful.
Thus, in the British community, adrenaline is only used by a minority of patients suffering from anaphylaxis. It is probable that a similar survey in Western Continental Europe would give the same results. This goes to show the need to explain more thoroughly the benefits of this process to families and young patients.


5.    Particularities of severe asthma (SA)

Theme: asthma
Key words: severe asthma – corticosteroids – smoking habit – obesity – gastro-oesophageal reflux – bio markers – Vitamin D – Pet-scan – FeNO – Super Dismutase Oxide– Anti-cholinergic bronchodilators - Macrolides

A large research programme on SA carried out in the USA is providing a better understanding of its definition, aspects and treatment (Nizar et al : AJRCCM 2011  November  17 in press). To define SA the authors propose two major criteria for treatment : use of high doses of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (IC), and 7 minor criteria based on : symptoms, frequency and severity of exacerbations, with or without hospitalisation possibly in Intensive Care Unit, troubles of respiratory function tests, extra medications, insensitivity to C. One major criterion and at least two minor criteria were considered as meeting the study conditions.

Lessons drawn from these researches confirm a large number of (sometimes classic) notions :

1)    Risk factors : active and passive smoking, obesity, gastro-oesophageal reflux, ethnicity (black skin), post-puberty females.

2)    Anatomical and functional aspects : incomplete bronchodilation and bronchial thickening, detected by tomography and MRI - a better technique for children than bronchial biopsy -, major alteration of small airways with alveolar inflation (trapping), and predominantly neutrophilic inflammation which can be detected by molecular imaging (Pet-Scan).

3)    Severity biomarkers : high FeNO due to respiratory obstruction and hyperinflation, but also lesser activity of the Super-Oxide Dismutase (SOD) associated to a severe drop in FEV1, increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in relation to the molecular asthma phenotype (for instance, with predominant Th2 or Th1), as well as lack of vitamin D in children (A.Gupta et al AJRCCM 201101034 1342-1349).

4)    Therapeutically, it is often insufficiently regular treatment which is one of the causes of severity , together with either the brutal weaning from C or, on the contrary, the use of too high doses of β² agonists. Also worth noting (P.Barnes et al JACI 2012 1 129 48-59) is the benefit from long term anticholinergic bronchodilators of the Tiotropiun type, without forgetting the macrolide-type antibiotics in cases of neutrophilic predominance, and anti-inflammatory and blocking medications for incriminated mechanisms or mediators (anti-IgEs, or anti-IL13, IL, IL9, PGD2) as well as the products likely to invert the corticosteroid-resistance such as “old” theophylline and nortryptiline. Thus, research is more and more oriented towards biomarkers of different subtypes of SA in order to respond by appropriate and more and more specific therapies.

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Claude MOLINA  -  claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr

Jacques GAYRAUD  -  j.gayraud@orange.fr


Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1. ATOPY HEREDITY : PATERNAL OR MATERNAL?
2. PEANUT ALLERGY : CAN SEVERE REACTIONS BE PREDICTED?
3. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF DIAGNOSTIC FOOD CHALLENGES TO CONFIRM THE RESOLUTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY
4. NASAL POLYPOSIS (NP) AND ANTI-IL5 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES (MA)
5. RHINOVIRUS AND RISKS OF ASTHMA EXACERBATION


1.    ATOPY HEREDITY : PATERNAL OR MATERNAL?
Theme: atopy, asthma
Key words: heredity, asthma, cytokines, atopy

A Danish university team involved in research on child asthma and hereditary transmission of atopy hypothesized different parental imprinting on the cytokines and chemokines in the upper airway mucosa lining fluid of neonates (NN), a set of chemical mediators considered as markers of natural and adaptive immunity.

This team developed an original, clever and non-invasive technique (N.V.Folsgaard et al AJRCCM  November 2011 ahead of print) of sampling by absorption on a filter (of the blotting paper type) of the nasal mucosal lining fluid, applied for 2 minutes, thus avoiding the dilution coming from lavage, for mediator concentrations just above the detection threshold. This technique proved safe for neonates and later for children.

It was applied on 309, 1 to 31-day-old NNs of a Danish cohort, and 18 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. At the same time, atopy was diagnosed among 173 mothers and 142 fathers (47%). In all, 241 NNs had either an atopic father or mother, without showing different characteristics from non-atopic parents’ NNs. These data were statistically treated (principal component analysis).

The results showed that atopic mother NNs presented a significant decrease in cytokine levels (IL10, IL12p, IL2, IL4, TNFα, Eotaxin 3, MCP-1, CP-4 and TARC) as compared to NNs with atopic fathers and non-atopic mothers.

Generally speaking, maternal (but not paternal) atopy shows a strong down-regulation in all these mediators, suggesting some delay in NN’s immunity maturation and therefore a notable influence of the maternal milieu on his immunity programming, either in utero (depending on nutritional factors or pregnancy microbiome) or perinatal life by placental transfer of IgEs.

…And the answer is… the Mother !


2.    PEANUT ALLERGY : CAN SEVERE REACTIONS BE PREDICTED?
Theme: food allergy, allergens
Key words: peanut, food challenge, specific IgE, eliciting dose, age, atopic dermatitis

Dutch paediatric allergists (Groningen et Amsterdam :T.Van der Zee et al JACI2011 128 1031-6), noting that severe reactions can occur after accidental ingestion of peanuts, have attempted to look for risk factors in children. They based their research on the eliciting dose in double-blind, placebo controlled food challenges (DBPCFC) as a marker for clinical responsiveness.

This was a retrospective study of a 2001-2009 data base of 126 peanut-positive DBPCFC
in subjects aged 3-17, two-thirds male, a majority with family atopic history, and having suffered themselves from a severe reaction to peanuts 4-36 months before the test. Specific IgEs were high (18.6 kU/L on average, with a dispersion of 3.8 to 76.6 kU/L). Some subjects were also suffering from atopic dermatitis (79 cases), asthma (79) or rhinitis (53).

The symptoms observed after the challenges (the eliciting dose varying from 200 to 820mg, with an average of 310mg) were either: Objective (angioedema, urticaria, dermatitis, rhino-conjunctivitis, coughing, wheezing, vomiting, diarrhoea) or Subjective (itching, nausea, dyspnoea). A score was given on the basis of these data and then statistically analysed (Cox regression model).

Results reveal that the eliciting dose (ED) is statistically correlated with 3 main risk factors:
1)    Subject’s age : those over 10 years of age have the lowest ED and therefore the severest clinical response, a somewhat surprising result in view of the usual belief that peanut allergy is becoming milder as time goes by.
2)    Specific IgE levels : over 5.6kU/L, which is understandable.
3)    Absence of associated atopic dermatitis, which is unexpected.

As to other factors, incriminated in other research or in clinical experience, such as gender, association with asthma or rhinitis, or previous severe reactions, no significant correlation was shown.

The authors however, knowing that  a risk of accidental ingestion is still possible recommend a strict eviction diet and a self-injectable epinephrin kit in case of accidental ingestion of peanuts.


3.    THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF DIAGNOSTIC FOOD CHALLENGES TO CONFIRM THE RESOLUTION OF PEANUT ALLERGY
Theme: food allergy, allergens
Key words: resolution diagnosis, peanut, food challenge, skin test, specific IgEs, anxiety, quality of life

Publications on the psychological factors of allergy are often   of limited interest in current practice. The originality of this work by a British team from Southampton- (R.C.Knibb et al Clin. Exper Allergy 2011 November ahead of print) is that it is based on precise scientific criteria (case-control study).

The authors point out that peanut allergy resolves itself in 20% of children and walnut and hazelnut allergy in 10%. Such resolution, clinically established by absence of reaction over several years and negative skin tests and specific IgEs, has to be confirmed by a per os food challenge ; it was interesting to evaluate anxiety, stress and quality of life of children and their mothers, on the day of the test and during the following 3-6 months.

103 families took part in this research and completed the corresponding questionnaires, which were validated in Great Britain. 40 children, aged 6-16, underwent the challenge and answered the questions on their social, school and emotional life. 63 children, with persistent allergy in the opinion of the allergist, were used for comparison and answered the same questions (the mother rather than the father being interviewed).

Results : 17 tests (43%) were positive, indicating the persistence of the allergy ; 50% of the children had a negative test. From a psychological point of view:
1)    Mothers reported raised anxiety on the day of the challenge (P=0.007) whereas children were less anxious than usual.
2)    Children (P=0.01) and mothers (P=0.01) had improved quality of life with regards to the role of peanut in their diets, but not concerning food allergy in general.
3)    Children reported lower anxiety levels in the 3-6 months following the negative test (P=0.02) but mothers’ anxiety remained unchanged.
4)    Finally, the improvements in children’s and maternal anxiety and quality of life were independent of the test results.

So, as could be expected, and unlike their children, mothers were more anxious on the challenge day, thus reflecting differences in risk perception. But what is curious is that children’s and mothers’ quality of life was improved even in the case of a positive food challenge. The authors believe this reveals a real appreciation of the challenge, considered as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool by the parents  and  even is disappointing, as a clarification  of information that influences management and imparts psychological benefits.  


4.    NASAL POLYPOSIS (NP) AND ANTI-IL5 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES (MA)
Theme: ORL allergy, immuno-physiopathology
Key words: nasal polyposis, anti-IL5 monoclonal antibodies, Mepolizumab, essinophils, cytokines

The Belgian university hospital ENT team (Gand et Liege P.Gevaert et al JACI 2011 128 989-95) famous for its expertise in NP, assisted by a group of English specialists, has in a recent paper rehabilitated the anti-IL5 MA Mepolizumab (M) which, presumably due to inaccurate indication, had been considered as inefficient in the treatment of asthma.

It should be remembered that, contrary to Chinese patients, in white Europeans 85% to 90% of nasal polyps are infiltrated by eosinophils, for which IL5 is the key driver of cell differentiation and survival. The authors sought to investigate the efficacy and safety of two intravenous injections (28 days apart) of M in severe NPs with chronic rhino-sinusitis, after a period of 11 months.

30 patients refractory to corticosteroids, some having relapsed after surgery and nearly half suffering from concomitant asthma, were randomised and treated (20 active and 10 placebo) ; the first objective was a reduction in NP size, to be seen via endoscopy and scanner, while at the same time monitoring the symptoms which usually accompany NPs (rhinorrhea, loss of smell, nasal peak expiratory flow, obstruction) and the biological signature  of activity (blood and tissue eosinophils, IL5, IL6, ECP and IgE dosage on nasal secretions),  are on the whole, subjected to statistical analysis.

At week 8, 12 patients of 20 in the active-group had a significantly improved NP size (compared to 1 of 10 placebo), calculated at 60% as opposed to 10% in the placebo group. The first objective was then achieved and confirms the authors’ first trial with a single M injection. As to the other symptoms, improvement was noted, except for rhinorrhea, but not statistically significant....

Finally, on a biological level, the treatment shows a significant reduction in blood eosinophilia, whereas the eosinophilia rebound observed with Reslizumab (another anti-IL5 mentioned in our September BUAs) was not observed, albeit frequently reported with these two anti-IL5 AMs. At the same time, blood and nose cytokines levels were also reduced.

Indeed, these improvements persisted until the 36th week and with no notable side effects, but the authors remain reserved on the long term use of M.


5.    RHINOVIRUS AND RISKS OF ASTHMA EXACERBATION
Theme: infection and allergy, asthma
Key words: rhinovirus, asthma exacerbation, neutrophilic inflammation

We have already reported (cf. November BUAs) the frequent appearance, even if not decisive, of rhinovirus in atopic children, as shown in the work of the Madison university team (Wisconsin, USA). The same authors, whose expertise in this field is prominent, now study the question with adults to assess its role in asthma exacerbations (L.C.Denlinger et al AJRCCM 2011 184 1007-14).

In other words, can an asthmatic’s routine seasonal cold be followed, in all cases, by greater viral multiplication and an infection of lower airways with neutrophilic inflammation ?

For this survey, during 9 consecutive winter seasons, they enrolled 52 asthmatics and 10 control, all volunteers, who were monitored daily at the first sign of a cold for the next 10 weeks, and with whom they went to specify, over and above the symptoms, the use of drugs, and the peak expiratory flow, performing periodical nasal lavage and sputum sampling for viral (including molecular) identification, and respiratory functional exploration, all this until all symptoms have disappeared.

25 participants developed an asthma exacerbation, preceded 5 days earlier by detection of human rhinovirus HRV. But among all the viral infections (3/4 being due to the rhinovirus), it is subgroup A’s rhinovirus which was statistically 4.4 times more likely to cause exacerbation.

However, it should be noted that neutrophils, and even virus, were present in sputum, in the non-atopic control lower airways and in the asthmatic group, which shows that these virus can behave no longer like pathogens but as ‘guests’ of these airways.

Nevertheless, asthma exacerbations were marked, and significantly so, by greater neutrophil counts.

On the whole, among adult asthmatic patients likely to catch a routine seasonal cold due to a rhinovirus, those who, over  ...upper airway infection, experience asthma exacerbation, have a high neutrophil count and a greater viral proliferation in sputum than i nasal samples. But the authors cannot specify by which mechanism ...allergic inflammation influences the antiviral response, or on the contrary sensitizes lower airways to viral injury.


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Comments and questions welcome :

Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
*claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr **j.gayraud@orange.fr
Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1.
ALLERGY OR RHINOVIRUS AS THE CAUSE OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
2. CROSS SENSITIZATION OF FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS
3. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF THE HUMAN GENOME STUDY IN ASTHMA
4. THE PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FARM MILK CONSUMPTION ON CHILDHOOD ASTHMA AND ATOPY
5. TREATMENT OF PERENNIAL RHINITIS BY NASAL INSUFFLATION OF CO2

1. ALLERGY OR RHINOVIRUS AS THE CAUSE OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
Theme: asthma
Key words: aeroallergen sensitization, rhinovirus, respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), serum IgEs, asthma

The chicken or the egg paradox

For many years now, allergists and pneumologists have been wondering which of aeroallergen sensitization (AS) or rhinovirus (virus-induced wheezing) was the initial cause of childhood asthma. As suggested by some animal models and clinical studies on severe RSV bronchiolitis, it is the virus which induces AS. But,if AS precedes and predisposes to viral wheeze, it is allergy prevention which must be the strategy in fighting asthma. In order to answer this question, D.J.Jackson et al (AJRCCM 29 Sept 2011 ahead of print) of Madison University (Wisconsin) selected within a cohort of USA children, 285 subjects at high-risk for asthma, given their family histories, and followed them from birth to age six.
The chronology of events during these 6 years was studied in great detail with : precise virus identification, obtained in 90% of the cases (HRV or Human Rhinovirus, RSV or Respiratory Syncitial Virus, Adenovirus, Influenza virus, Coronavirus…), and corresponding clinical manifestations in the form of asthma-like wheezing, clinically diagnosed and requiring appropriate treatment (anti-infection and bronchodilator). At the same time serum IgEs to common aeroallergens were assessed each year. These data were treated using a multi-states Markov statistical model in continuous time. Results are significant :
1) children who were sensitized to aeroallergens have a greater risk of developing viral wheezing than non-sensitized children and, if this absolute risk is greatest at 1 year of age, the relative risk is consistently increased at every age assessed ;
2) AS leads to an increased risk of HRV- but not RSV- viral episodes ;
3) By contrast a viral wheezing episode does not induce a greater risk of AS.
Thus, for the authors, these results are indisputable:  AS precedes HRV viral wheezing and the converse is not true. So the prevention of allergy can indeed limit the development of viral wheezing, and consequently of childhood asthma.

2. CROSS SENSITIZATION OF FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS
Theme: food allergy
Key words: tropomyosin, shell food allergy, dust mites, D.Farinae, cockroach, Blatella Germanica

It is known that food allergens such as shrimp, dust mite or cockroach, own a common protein : tropomyosin, which could account for the cross sensitization (CS) in subjects exposed to one or the other allergen, and who present high rates of specific IgEs, without clinical manifestations.
Based on data from USA national cohorts, which indicated that food allergy was particularly frequent – with an increased prevalence of high IgE shrimp allergy – in a population of inner-city black children, Julie Wang et al (JACI 128 4 834_837) wanted to check the possible correlation between IgE-mediated sensitization to shrimp and allergen exposure to dust mite and cockroach.
For this purpose, they studied the serum of 500 subjects in a cohort of 1528 children aged 4-9 and living in New-York, St Louis and Baltimore inner-cities, while their homes were checked for concentrations of Dermatophagoides Farinae and Blattela Germanica.
They first observed a strong correlation between shrimp, cockroach and dust mite specific IgE levels. Furthermore, high exposure to cockroach in the home, particularly in the bedroom and television room, was significantly correlated with higher shrimp and cockroach IgE levels. In contrast, high exposure to dust mite in the home was highly correlated with IgE levels to D.Farinae but not with shrimp IgE levels. Besides, exposure and presence of cockroach IgEs are predictive of high shrimp IgE levels.
Thus, in children with evidence of joint IgE-mediated sensitization to cockroach and shrimp, having high exposure to cockroach in their inner-cities’ home can contribute to higher shrimp IgE levels, which might not correlate with clinical allergic reactivity.
This notion should be taken into consideration for the interpretation of a shrimp sensitization in such subjects, and before any attempt of provocative tests usually recommended for confirmation of the corresponding food allergy.

3. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF THE HUMAN GENOME STUDY IN ASTHMA
Theme: genetics, asthma
Key words: asthma, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, inhaled corticosteroids, genome, gene GLCC11, allele rs37972, allele rs37973

The explosion in genetic research, the speed and accuracy of new generation techniques, call for acquaintance with interpretation of results and their present and future relevance for allergic diseases. A recent review does this with reference to respiratory diseases (J.Todd et al AJRCCM 2011 184 873-880). Up to February 2011 a total of 22 studies had been published, 13 of which on the genetic basis of asthma. The validity of results depends on an accurate classification of the disease, a great rigor in the genetic study, a platform large enough to cover the whole genome, quality controls, a study of the many genotypic nucleotides (SNP : single nucleotide polymorphism), a bio-informatic and statistical analysis and a confirmation in other patient groups (replication populations). The difficulty with asthma comes from the heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes, and the probable role of associated environmental factors in the development of the disease. Hence, the limited practical relevance of this research at present.
In contrast, by addressing a well-targeted category of asthmatics, i.e. subjects where inhaled corticosteroid therapy is ineffective (1 in 3 on average), the genome study (Genome-Wide Association) has led to identifying a genetic variant associated to the pharmacological treatment response (K.G.Tantisira et al NEJM 2011 365 1173-83).
The authors followed 1041 asthmatic children aged 5-12, enrolled in a large cohort (Childhood Asthma Management Program : CAMP) clinically and functionally monitored and random-treated either by Budesonide(®, Nedocromil® or Placebo, for an average of 4.6 years. 422 subjects were selected and genotyped (DNA) as well as their parents ; out of this group 118 trios (child + both parents) were isolated. From these examples, the researchers identified, based on family statistics, 13 possible SNP candidates among the 534290 tested ones. These SNPs were replicated in 4 different patient groups, which made it possible to isolate within gene GLCC11 (gluco-corticoid transcript) an allelic variant, rs37972, associated with a lower FEV1 in response to inhaled corticoids (ICs).
To confirm this observation, the authors made use of cell lineages isolated in vitro and managed to isolate re37973 which is in total correlation (linkage disequilibrium) with rs37972, both associated with decrements in gene GLCC11 expression, i.e. the absence of response to ICs.
This substantial pharmacological effect, prefiguring personalised treatment (according to J.M.Drazen in an Editorial on this research)  , is not however outstanding : if, in the IC-treated CAMP patients with rs37973 the FEV1 decrease is statistically 3 times lower than in those who do not own this allele, the values are low and only concern a small number of asthmatic patients.

4. THE PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FARM MILK CONSUMPTION ON CHILDHOOD ASTHMA AND ATOPY
Theme: prevention, atopy
Key words: asthma, farm milk, raw milk, boiled milk, whey

This is the new factor identified by the German and Swiss epidemiologists of the E. Von Mutius group, among those which have been suspected to account for the protective effect of the rural life against asthma and atopy. The authors again used their data base (GABRIEL), sent a questionnaire to the parents of 8334 school children and obtained serum samples from 7606 of these children for the detection of specific IgEs. Moreover, on 800 samples of milk from the parents’ farm, they conducted bacteria counts and measured fat content and whey protein levels; this data was confronted to asthma, atopy and pollinosis, and statistically analysed by multiple regression (G.Loss et al JACI 2011 128 766-773).
It appears that raw milk consumption is inversely associated with asthma, atopy and hay fever, independent of other farm exposures. Boiled farm milk did not show this protective effect, nor bacterial counts or total fat content of milk.
In contrast, the whey proteins account for the protective effect against asthma, but not against atopy. It is the case for the bovine serum-albumin, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin, all proteins pertaining to the residual liquid from milk skimming and contributing to the production of cheese and buttermilk.
On the whole, the protective effect of raw milk consumption on asthma could be attributed to the whey protein fraction of milk.
But, in cauda venenum, the authors admit that, even if this research is interesting from an epidemiological point of view, the consumption of raw milk for protection on asthma or atopy cannot be recommended in practice because it could contain a number of pathogenic elements !

5. TREATMENT OF PERENNIAL RHINITIS BY NASAL INSUFFLATION OF CO2
Theme: ORL, allergy
Key words: allergic rhinitis, nasal CO2 insufflation

The authors, who in 2008 had already pointed out the effect of CO2 administered by nasal insufflations, without inhalation (Casale et al JACI 2008 121 105-109), have extended their research by a multicenter random study with a view to confirming the efficacy and safety of this treatment, a symptomatic but non-pharmacological treatment which can be useful in certain persistent forms of rhinitis affecting quality of life of patients (Casale et al : Allergy,Asthma,Immunol 2011 107 364-370).
The technique consists in administering CO2 out of a standard gas high-capacity cylinders, fitted with a regulator and valves to control the flow rate (5 to 10 ml/s in the random trial), connected to a tube ending with an adaptable and disposable nasal piece. The insufflation is performed under medical supervision, for duration of a few seconds in each nostril (10 to 30 depending on the group) while the patient is asked not to inhale the gas, but invited to breath by mouth if necessary. At the same time, symptom scores are assessed from 1 to 6 according to the severity of nasal symptoms (congestion, rhinorrea, sneezes, itching) and non-nasal symptoms (eye and ear itches, pharyngeal lacrimation, red eyes).
Thus, 6 groups (including the Placebo ones) are formed, totalling 348 subjects suffering from rhinitis for over 2 years and presenting signs of allergy to common aeroallergens (except pollens).
It is group B (70 subjects), treated for 10 seconds at 10 ml/s in each nostril, which showed the most statistically significant results, with regression of all symptoms (nasal and non-nasal) in less than 30 minutes and for several hours (4 to 6) ; in the previous trial conducted by the authors the improvement could last up to 24 hours.
The other groups (5ml/s for 30 seconds, or 5 and 30 or 10 and 30) are more efficacious than the 2 Placebo groups, but not significantly enough. As to adverse effects, these were limited to some headaches and temporary nasal discomfort.
As a conclusion, we have evidence here of the treatment of symptoms, almost immediate but short in duration, which could be useful in young or elderly subjects, intolerant to drug treatments. But the effects of insufflation of CO2 several times a day, as well as the still unknown action mechanism of this treatment, call for further researches.

-----

Comments and questions welcome:

Pr. Claude Molina and/or Dr Jacques Gayraud
Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

1.
Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) to grass pollen (GP) : recent data
2. Chronic urticaria (CU) treated by single-dose Omalizumab (O) : a randomised study
3. Obesity (O) surgery in asthmatics (A)
4. Psoriasis (P) vs atopic eczema (AE) : clinical coexistence and biological antagonism
5. Treating atopic dermatitis (AD) with narrow-band UVB phototherapy (NB-UVB)

1. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) to grass pollen (GP) : recent data

Theme:
specific immunotherapy
Key words: sublingual immunotherapy – grass pollen – Oralair – pollen calendar – symptom score

SLIT efficiency in treating GP allergic rhino-conjunctivitis is well known and recent data mainly concerns its administration modes and length of efficacy. This was the purpose of the survey conducted by the Euro-Canadian group led by A.Didier (Toulouse) in a multicenter randomised study whose carefully elaborated protocol made use of Oralair tablets (5-grass 300-IR Stallergens)® for 2- or 4-month periods before co-seasonal treatment (A.Didier et al : JACI 2011 128 3 September  559-566).
633 adults, aged 18 to 50, were then taken in charge from 2007 to 2009, firstly by watching the region-specific pollen calendar (23 countries took part in the survey), secondly by adjusting the individual symptom score according to the intensity of observed signs and the more or less urgent need for rescue medication, i.e. inhaled or per os antihistaminic drugs or corticosteroids.
Three consecutive seasons were monitored with three groups: 1 Placebo (P, 216 subjects) and 2 patient groups respectively treated for 2 months (147) and 4 months (149) before the beginning of the co-seasonal treatment, a treatment undertaken when the atmospheric pollen concentration was over 30 grains/m3 for three consecutive days.

The first goal was to statistically calculate an mean score adjusted for the study’s various parameters, at the end of the 3rd season, by comparing it to group P’s. The second was to compare the overall and individual symptomatology (including the rescue medication score) and the treated patients’ quality of life to those of group P. and, finally, to appreciate the general tolerance of the drug.

Results showed a significant reduction in the mean adjusted symptom score, respectively by 36% and 34.5% in the 2- and 4-month pre-seasonally treated groups (P ?.0001), for the mono- as well as the poly-sensitised subjects, whereas the questionnaire on quality of life showed marked improvement in both active groups. Finally, most adverse effects (essentially local) decreased in number and intensity over the 3 seasons, thus making it possible to compute 97% treatment compliance. Moreover, this favourable evolution was sustained without treatment for the 2 following seasons.

In conclusion, this long-term, very carefully conducted 5-year survey offers two interesting lessons :
1) It is not necessary to start the treatment long before the pollen season (2 months are generally sufficient), on the condition that it is followed by the co-seasonal treatment
2) It is not necessary to continue the treatment longer than the usual 3 years, since SLIT remains efficient for at least 2 more years

Overall, this is an accurate and convincing argument in favour of an economical treatment which will surely be appreciated by doctors and patients.

2. Chronic urticaria (CU) treated by single-dose Omalizumab (O) : a randomised study

Theme:
urticaria / treatment
Key words: chronic urticaria – auto anti-IgE antibodies, auto anti-Fc€R antibodies– urticaria activity score

It is a fact that the treatment of CU is particularly difficult and several isolated observations in recent publications have mentioned a variety of drug trials.

This is the case of beneficial effect recently observed with O, which, according to the authors, can be explained by the presence in some patients of IgG auto-antibodies, anti-IgE or anti-Fc€, its high affinity receptor, which cause degranulation of mast cells and skin basophils and release of histamine. We have here the first randomised, multicenter, US-German, phase II study, with a substantial number of patients (90), which brings in convincing results on the efficacy of single-dose Omalizumab (Xolair ®) in CUs resistant to usual antihistaminic treatment (S.Saini et al : JACI 2011 128 3 567-73).

The US patients were aged 12-75 and the Germans 18-75, all suffering from idiopathic CU, i.e. with daily or almost daily occurrence, in the form of pruriginous papules and erythema, sometimes of angio-oedema, an eruption lasting for more than 6 weeks without a known cause and needing the permanent use of antihistamines (AH) which can usually be recommended in quadruple dose in case of insufficient efficacy.
These subjects, AH-resistant and presenting an urticaria activity score (UAS) of 7-12 days (prurit, papules) and severity-graded from 0 to 6, were divided into 4 groups : a Placebo group (21 patients), and the 3 others respectively treated by a single O injection of 75mg  (23 patients), 300mg  (25), or 600mg (20).

The first objective was to evaluate the UAS improvement after 4 weeks. Only the 300mg and 600mg groups showed significant improvement vs the Placebo group, by 13 points for the first (-19 vs -6.9 i.e. P?.001) and 7 points for the second (-14.6 vs -6.9 i.e. P?.047). This improvement was confirmed during the 12 following weeks both for pruritus and eruptions. Only among the O-75mg group was no meaningful difference observed to that of the placebo.

However what is remarkable is that the onset of improvement occurred as early as week 2 (when 1 to 2 months are generally needed to appreciate O efficacy on asthma). As to tolerance, this did not differ from the placebo group : no notable side effects were observed.

Admittedly the study must continue on a larger number of patients, and in all cases this was a symptomatic treatment whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. Besides it cannot be specified whether further injections will be necessary in the longer term.
However, and in conclusion, a 300mg (or 600mg) single-injection of O is capable of efficiently and rapidly treating chronic urticaria resistant to antihistamines ; which represents a valuable option in a disease such as CU the evolution of which often  causes despair.

3. Obesity (O) surgery in asthmatics (A)

Theme:
asthma
Key words: obesity – asthmatic – inflammation marker – bariatric surgery – serum IgEs – adipokine – lymphocytic markers

Asthma is difficult to treat in an obese patient. By assuming a pathogenic interaction between the asthmatic  airway inflammation and obesity, the US authors of Burlington-Vermont (A.Dixon et al: JACI 2011 2128 508-15) wished to check whether :
1) inflammation markers were higher with O than with non-O ;
2) corrective O surgery (also known as “bariatric surgery” BS) did improve treatment of A and decrease these markers.
With this view, they enrolled 41 OAs and 35 control and eventually followed 23 OAs and 21 non- OAs. over 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. All subjects underwent BS.

Beside the BMI (Body Mass Index in Kg/m2), the study focused on respiratory functions (particularly airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine) and markers (among which lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) as well as levels of serum IgEs and adipokine.
At the end of the surveillance period, and whatever the BS type, (laparoscopy with derivation: by-pass or stomach ringing or strapping) the patients observed a significant improvement in their A score and quality of life (P? .0001 for both groups).
AHR was also improved (P? .03), particularly in older, non atopic subjects, with normal IgE levels suffering from late onset asthma, but without relation to airway inflammation

Paradoxically, these subjects presented increased rates of lymphocytic markers and bronchoalveolar lymphocytes after BS.
On the other hand, the younger atopic obese subjects, with high IgE levels, suffering from early onset asthma, also experience an improvement, albeit with no changes in their AHR.

Thus, post-O-surgery dissociation seems to occur between asthmatic symptomatology, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation, whether the subject is atopic or not. And this suggests that O lead to a distinct and unique A phenotype, possibly suitable for surgery.

4. Psoriasis (P) vs atopic eczema (AE) : clinical coexistence and biological antagonism

Theme:
eczema / skin allergy
Key words: psoriasis – atopic eczema – interferon ? - lymphocyte Th1 - lymphocyte Th17 – lymphocyte Th2 – lymphocyte Th22 - HLA alleles - Filaggrine – IL 4 interleukin – staphylococcus aureus

These two common diseases, of an epithelial or immune origin, involving hereditary factors and environment, often associated to other body disorders (joints for P, airway for AE), have a distinct physiopathology: the former (P) is characterised by involvement of Th1 lymphocytes with release of interferon ??and Th17 with their cytokines IL17A, 17F and IL22; the latter (AE) is dominated by the Th2 with higher levels of IgEs, total or specific to one or more allergens. Such an antagonism could account for the rarity of their clinical association in the same patient. Therefore the file presented by the Munich (Germany) group of dermatologists and allergists (S.Eyerich et al NEJM 2011 365 231-238) only involves 3 patients, but these are particularly well studied, and complemented by 5 others suffering from P associated with Nickel-contact dermatitis (CD).

In addition to their history and clinical observations, including a severity score for P and the SCORAD index for AE, the study includes classical biological investigations, a series of allergic tests (Nickel and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus patch-tests) and a skin biopsy for each type of lesion, divided in two parts : one is histological, the other is for studying cell lineages and their cytokine profile ; at the same time, a genomewide study of the leukocyte DNA was performed for HLA alleles and for Filaggrine gene mutations.

The results are shown in the numerous tables and graphs illustrating this article, from which a lesion-specific histological aspect appears: acanthosis, chequer plaques, neutrophilic micro-abscess and spongiosis for P, and mixed infiltrate with eosinophils, T cells and granulocytes for AE.
The cytological study confirms that P presents a number of Th1 and Th17, with secretion of interferon ? and IL17, and AE a large number of Th2 and Th22 with secretion of IL4 in vitro. IL22 (coming from Th17 and 22) is liberated in equal quantities in both lesions. As for the CD lesions resulting from Nickel allergy , they are dominated, like those of P, by Th1 and Th17, but few T cells of P react to Nickel.

Moreover, atopic lesions (and not those of P) frequently harbour microbiological colonies (Staphylococcus aureus), which proves that the immunity due to Th1 and Th17 is partially inhibited by the Th2, whereas the histochemical expression of Filaggrine is higher in P, also suggesting its inhibition by the Th2.
Therefore, the pathogenesis of these 2 diseases does not seem to be based on an intrinsic epithelial anomaly, but more likely on a migration of different T sub-populations, in response to a triggering factor, either known in AE or unknown in P, and leading to skin inflammation.
The treatment of these 2 affections confirm their antagonism: anti-TNFα molecules (Infliximab) are very efficient in P, but exacerbate AE lesions. IL4, which opposes INF ? and IL17 effects on keratocytes, could be an interesting therapy for P but would be inefficient or even contra-indicated for AE.

In fact, non-specific treatments such as the antibody Ustekinumab which targets Th1 and Th17, just like Ciclosporine which inhibits the 2 sub-populations, were efficient on P and AE conjunctive lesions in the subjects studied.

5. Treating atopic dermatitis (AD) with narrow-band UVB phototherapy (NB-UVB)

Theme:
eczema / skin allergy
Key words: atopic dermatitis -  UVB phototherapy, narrow band (NB-UVB) – lymphocytes TH1 – lymphocytes Th2 – cytokine IL22 –Th2/T22 axis

Among the many treatments of AD, the NB-UVB has the advantage of being usable with young subjects and for relatively long periods of time, with no major side effects and relatively low cost.

The multicenter US-Italian-Israeli study of this issue aimed to establish the reversibility of lesions, bio-markers of therapeutic response, and to specify the immuno-modulator effects of the treatment (S.Tintle et al JACI 2011 128 3 583-593).
12 patients aged 24 to 54, 9 male and 3 female, were treated 3 times a week for 12 weeks with the same protocol. Skin biopsies before and after treatment were carried out and evaluated by using gene expression and immunohistochemistry studies.
Results are as follows :
All patients benefited from a clinical improvement with a 50% reduction in their SCORAD score.
The lesion reversibility, in close correlation with the clinical symptomatology, was accompanied by a genomic reversal of the epidermal hyperplasia and above all of the inflammatory markers: the authors observed a decrease in the expression of 372 genes and an increase for 192 others, in whose list T-cells (CD2), activated T-cells (CD69), Th2 (CCL13, CCL26, CCL18 and mostly IL10), TNF α and IL12 could be found.
It is then a strong suppression of the Th2/T22 pathogenic axis and of associated cytokines that can be found in these lesions, with elimination of inflammatory leukocytes, including T-cells and dendritic cells.
As to the reduction of epidermal proliferation (decrease in thickening and in keratocyte proliferation), it is correlated with a reduced expression of the IL22 cytokine, responsible for this hyperplasia.
Finally, a normalised expression of epidermal barrier proteins completes the therapy.

The authors believe that the reversibility of chronic AD lesions results both from a correction of epidermal alterations and a reversal of immune activation. This runs against the fixed genetic phenotype theory and underlines the usefulness of checking the impressive list of Th2/T22 axis bio-markers drawn up by the authors, in the treatment of chronic AD.

Such treatment is widely targeting the immune factor: in addition to local (corticosteroids and calcineurine inhibitors such as tacrolimus) or general treatments (such as cyclosporine, UVA with psoralens and, for the severest forms, high intensity UVB), narrow-band UVB has definitely confirmed its place.

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Comments and questions welcome :
Pr. Claude Molina and/or Dr Jacques Gayraud
EAACI PAAM 2011 abstract submission deadline 10 August 2011

The 2nd Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting, PAAM 2011, will be held in the wonderful city of Barcelona, Spain, 13 – 15 October 2011, and will be attended by internationally renowned speakers from around the world.

The scientific programme addresses not only specialists in pediatric allergology, but also general pediatricians, specialists in pediatric pulmonology and gastroenterology, general practitioners and researchers dealing with children with allergic diseases. Therefore we strongly suggest that you do submit your work to this spectacular audience.

There will be a mixture of plenary sessions and symposia as well as interactive clinical and practical sessions. In other words, there will be plenty of opportunities to present your work and get it noticed by the top experts in the field of pediatric allergy and asthma.

The attractive programme will provide an excellent opportunity for scientific and social communication, interaction and inspiration as well as networking with leading experts, physicians, scientists and decision makers. Don’t miss this opportunity and join us at the PAAM 2011!

Submit your abstract here
The 2nd Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting, PAAM 2011, will be held in the wonderful city of Barcelona, Spain, 13 – 15 October 2011, and will be attended by internationally renowned speakers from around the world. The scientific programme addresses not only specialists in pediatric allergology, but...

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EAACI Online Elections for the Sections', IGs and JMA Representatives are now open and will close on 1 April at midnight CET.  You may choose from a list of selected candidates, and cast your vote for the representative of your choice!  As you have to make decision out of many candidates, you have the opportunity to read their nomination form and for every JMA candidate, a CV is available and a photo is displayed online.  For the elections' procedures, you may click here.  You will be informed of the outcome of the elections' process in due time.  Now, follow the link below to vote!

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PhARF is a collaboration between Uppsala University and Phadia AB.  It is based on an international Scientific Committee comprised of internationally recognized scientists in the field of allergy. The committee meets once a year to select candidates for the Award.  Now is the time to nominate to the PhARF Award 2011.  The deadline for Nomination is December 31st, 2010.  The Award amounts to USD 50.000. 

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Claude MOLINA & Jacques GAYRAUD

1 Anaphylaxis: new developments
2. Pigeon breeders’ disease : utility of a provocation test
3. Long-term protection against allergy  of growing up on a farm
4. IgE allergy to cephalosporins : cross-reactivity and tolerability of other β-lactamins
5. Plea for non-surgical treatment of child adenoidal hypertrophy

1.  Anaphylaxis: new developments
Theme: Emergency
Key words: Anaphylaxis, biomarkers, Patient education, Epinephrin self-injection

The Task Force of the US Academies of Allergy and Immunology has, under Phil Libermann’s leadership (JACI 2010 126 3 477-480), published a series of new recommendations on this theme.
Thus, on a physio-pathological point of view, it appears that the classic mediator cascade – histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, all derived from the mast cell / basophil couple – is no longer the only culprit, so that a number of patients do not respond to epinephrine any more. It is the case for intra-vascular coagulation shock which should be treated with an anti-fibrinolytic such as tranexamic acid and for hypotension associated with anaphylaxis and producing nitric oxide calling for treatment by methylene blue. A number of biomarkers are mentioned, such the classical trypsin and histamine, but also: carboxypeptidase, and hydrolase PAF : their low serum levels being  a witness of bad prognosis.
On a clinical level the authors underline the need to maintain the subject in recumbent position until symptoms disappear, deaths having occurred after assuming prematurely an upright position
Biphasic reactions take place in one quarter of serious or even lethal cases.
Among  etiological factors, food allergy (FA) represents in  USA 30% of causes of death whereas asthma is a risk factor for severe FA. Hymenoptera sting, latex, anaesthetics, biological drugs including allergenic immunotherapy, intense practice of sport, sperm allergy, are the classic triggering agents.
Prevention depends on individual factors such as age, occupation, home location (distance to a medical centre for instance), but the most important strategy seems to be patient training, above all if the subject has presented a previous reaction to an insect sting or immunotherapy. Patients are taught to auto-inject epinephrine using a pre-filled syringe and a needle long enough to reach the muscle (ex : mg 0.15/ml 0.3 in an adult). Indications of hospitalisation in an intensive care unit and  treatment by anti-histamines, corticoids  and oxygen, are mentioned in a chart, noted in this 46-page, 310-references report.

2.  Pigeon breeders’ disease : utility of a provocation test
Theme: Respiratory allergy, Allergens
Key words: Pigeon breeders’ disease, Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, Primitive Interstitial pneumonitis, Avian Antigens provocation test, Body temperature.

The Mexican authors who published this text in 1998 under the leadership of A.Ramirez (AJRCCM 1998 158 3 862-8698), came back to it in 2010 (AJRCCM 2010 182 pages 1086-87) on the occasion of a critical study by Dr Kern, dug up by the editors who apologise for not having published it sooner.
The authors, who had observed  the frequency of bird pets in Mexican homes, had underlined in their initial report the usefulness of a provocation test induced by avian antigens, particularly in differentiating Pigeon Breeders’ Disease (PBD), which is a form of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, from Primitive Interstitial Pneumonitis (PIP) whose prognosis is more serious.
17 patients with confirmed PBD were compared to 17 PIP and 5 healthy control subjects. After the provocation test (PT) an increase in body temperature and a decrease in FVC, SaO2 and PaO2 were observed in the 17 patients with PBD and in 3 with PIP, the healthy subjects showing no reaction.
The authors undertook then a serious statistical study, which was the object of the critical letter. In their answer, they admit that, when a patient with PIP shows a negative response to the PT, one can be 100% sure that he does not have PBD. When the PT is positive, the positive predictive value, i.e. the possibility of having PBD, is higher than 80%. But the authors insist that the critical value for positive predictive value (‘cut point’) should be a 0.5° raise in body temperature, an increase which allows them to display 76% sensitivity and 81% specificity.
This discussion brings us back to the diagnosis criteria for PBD and underlines the utility, going beyond clinical and radiological signs, the value of serum precipitating antibodies, and if possible broncho-alveolar lavage, showing predominance of CD4 lymphocytes, all methods helping to avoid lung biopsy which reveals alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis  leading to chronic fibrosis.
But, as the authors also recognise, simply taking the subjects out of their home environment for 2 or 3 days leads to a decrease in many symptoms, while bringing them back home and re-exposition act as a provocation test.

3.  Long-term protection against allergy of growing up on a farm
Theme: Epidemiology
Key-words: Protection against allergy, Urbanization levels, Farming environment

Many studies have shown the low prevalence of allergic rhinitis in farmers and their children, thus deducing the allergy-protective effect of childhood farm environment, which was confirmed by several epidemiological studies.
The Swedish authors (J.Eriksson et al : Allergy 2010 65 1397-1403) wished to go further and discover whether this protection is conserved throughout adulthood and how it corresponds to different degrees of urbanization ; the level of urbanization being defined by the new living conditions, either in a small town (2 to 10,000 inhabitants), a medium-size town (over 100,000 inhabitants) or a large town such as Gothenburg (700,000 inhabitants).
In 2008 a questionnaire on respiratory health was sent to 30,000 subjects aged 16-75, of whom 29,218 could be traced and 18,087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on allergic rhinitis, asthma, respiratory symptoms and possible determinants.
The subjects were stratified into age groups of 15 years.
As expected, those who had lived on a farm during their first 5 years of life had a considerably lower prevalence of allergic rhinitis in their adulthood, and in all age groups, even among the oldest (61-75 years) and in both the 16-45 year and the 46-75 year groups.
But a significant trend of increasing prevalence was observed with increasing degrees of urbanization, independent of the protective effect of childhood in a farming environment.
As a conclusion, the authors believe that childhood life on a farm does provide a lifelong protective effect against allergic rhinitis.
But the increasing prevalence in urban surroundings can be observed as much in those raised on a farm as in those not, which proves that the deleterious influence of urbanisation is as bad for the child as for the adult, whether or not they have grown up in a farming environment.

4.  IgE allergy to cephalosporins : cross-reactivity and tolerability of other β-lactams
Theme: Drug allergy
Key words: Beta lactams, Cephalosporins, Penicillins, Monobactam, Carbapenems, Skin tests.

For several years the team of Italian allergists led by A.Romano has been interested in this theme and has undertaken a new prospective survey in 98 subjects having presented one or more reactions, of which 84 of an anaphylactic type, to cephalosporins (Cs) and who had positive skin tests to those antibiotics (JACI 2010126 5 994-999). The aim was to assess the cross-reactivity with other β-lactams such as penicillins, but also with monobactams (astreonam) and carbapenems, and the tolerability of these drugs in case of necessity.
All the patients – 68 women and 30 men of 13 to 90 years of age, all IgE allergic to Cs – underwent skin tests and serum-specific IgE assays with penicillin reagents, as well as skin tests with aztreonam, imipenem/cilastatin and meropenem .Subjects with negative tests were challenged with the last three drugs and amoxicillin (l®).
The results are the following : 25% of the subjects allergic to Cs shown positive skin tests to penicillins, and only 3.1% to aztreonam (A), 2% to imipenem/clastatin (I) and 1% to meropenem (M).
The risks of cross-reactivity with penicillins were statistically three times higher for the Cs whose side-chain structures are similar (cephalotin, cefamandole) or identical (cefaclor, cephalexine, cefatrizine) than for Cs with different side-chains (ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefuroxime, cefazoline, cefoperazone, cefonicid). In those cases, a preliminary positive skin test require an antibiotic different from the β-lactams, or even a desensitisation to penicillins. But a negative test removes all doubts about their use.
As to the provocation tests for A, I or M, these were negative except for one urticarial reaction to I, thus confirming their low cross-reactivity with Cs. It is then possible to conclude like the good clinicians authors, that 75% of the Cs-allergic subjects can tolerate penicillins and more than 95%  tolerate As, Is, and Ms. For the latter ones, a negative skin test allows their use with very low risk.
These conclusions are validated by the ‘Task Force on Practice Parameters’ on drug allergy (Annals of Allergy Asthma & Immunol 2010 105 259-273) representing all the US Academies of Allergy.

5.  Plea for non-surgical treatment of child adenoidal hypertrophy
Theme : Ear-Nose-Throat allergies
Key words : Aenoids, Nasal corticoids, Beclomethasone, Flunisolide, Fluticasone, Momethasone.

In a well-documented report, G.Scadding (Pediatric Allergy & Immunol 2010 21 1095-1106) recalls that adenoidal hypertrophy (AH), often associated with that of tonsils (T), are common disorders among children and can induce various problems such as snoring, nasal congestion, sinusitis, recurring middle ear otitis, and even obstructive sleep apnea. In the long run, it is even the cause of neuro-psychological or cardiovascular troubles, and growth retardation. No wonder surgical ablation is the commonest strategy, despite the detailed list of complications, which range from immediate or delayed local haemorrhage to anaesthesia complications.
That is why a number of alternatives have been suggested. The frequency of physio-pathological links between AH and allergic inflammation is underlined, particularly association with allergic rhinitis.
The intranasal use of corticosteroids (INS) was then attempted by several teams and for different drugs, always in double-bind tests.
The first trials concerned Beclomethasone in nasal spray for 2 to 4 weeks followed by 16 to 24 weeks according to the authors and at a rate of 336 to 400µg/d with significant results on AH and the symptomatic score.
With Flunisolide , a study of 178 children aged 3-6 revealed a decrease in the size of AHs, thus avoiding surgery.
Fluticasone was used by the author (unpublished study) in 40 children registered on an adenoidectomy waiting list, with no great clinical success as compared with the control group, but  histological study of the AHs showed a decrease in T-activated cells of the adenoid tissue, revealing product penetration into the AHs but not into the tonsils.
Finally, 3 randomised trials with Momethasone furoate ( 100µg/d) for periods of 6 to 8 weeks produced excellent results among which an interesting effect on an antibiotic-resistant otitis.
The unfounded fears concerning the use of INS in children for long periods of time, as well as the minimal local side effects, do not contra-indicate such treatments.
INS therefore represent an efficient alternative for a number of children. Other studies are necessary to define the most suitable INS, as well as dosage and duration of treatment.


Source:  CEFCAP
You may send comments on these brief news to cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr


Dedicated to Franz MARRACHE  In memoriam


Claude MOLINA & Jacques GAYRAUD


Comparison of the skin prick-test and IgE to diagnose house-dust mite allergy

Theme: Allergens
Key-words: skin prick tests, specific IgEs, D.Pteronyssinus, D.Farinae


A group of South-Korean ENT specialists (Jung Yong Gi et al :American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy Juin 2010 24 3 226-229), noting that some patients show a discrepancy between skin prick-tests and specific IgEs (by Phadia Immuno Cap), had the idea to compare these two types of test, with 692 subjects suffering from mite allergic rhinitis and to interpret the results according to age  group in order to draw appropriate guidelines.

With 336 D.Pteronyssimus allergic patients, prick-tests appeared more useful than IgEs in detecting allergy for the under-50s (p? 0.0001), whereas for the 350 D.Farinae allergic, specific IgEs were more reliable in all age groups ; however prick-tests on those subjects were less useful for the over-30s (p? 0.0001).

As expected, but it is reassuring to read scientific and statistical confirmation, it is recommended for the diagnosis of over-50 subjects to use specific IgEs (ImmunoCap) rather than skin tests, whereas prick-tests are advised as first choice with the under-30s.

Similarly, attention should be drawn to the recent publication by the American Allergy Academies (Human IgE antibody serology : R.G.Hamilton JACI 126 Juillet 2010 33-38) which indicates a number of variations, around 15%, between results of different procedures of specific IgE detection as available in the US (Phadia, Siemens, Hycor). This could in fact reveal the existence of different populations of IgEs. That is why, in the future, we should not be satisfied with a single biological result but try to obtain information on the test type and several other parameters : among others, antibody concentration,  specific /total IgE ratio, epitope specificity, all factors of ultimately disease expression.


Predicting side effects of immunotherapy to hymenoptera venom

Key-words: bee venom, wasp venom, serum tryptase concentration, specific immunotherapy

A very important multicenter German-Italian-French-Swiss study under the auspices of our eminent colleague, Professor Wutrich  (F.Rueff et al  JACI July 2010  126  1 105_111), reminds us that the VIT initiated in the 1980s and widely recognised for its efficiency may be associated with side effects, some severe and even requiring emergency intervention.
680 patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Its aim was to assess the baseline serum tryptase concentration and other clinical parameters which are routinely recorded during the build-up phase, so as to try to predict the occurrence of these severe reactions : type of VIT (rush or standard procedure), patient’s age, gender, culprit insect (bee or wasp), magnitude of sting reaction, associated cardiovascular medication, venom specific IgEs. All these factors were then statistically treated.

57 patients (8.4%), required an emergency intervention during VIT, a frequency significantly higher in conjunction with a higher serum tryptase concentration. This predictive correlation is higher when VIT was performed for wasp rather than bee venom.
However the other factor significantly associated to side effect severity is bee venom allergy.

In conclusion, before wasp venom VIT, serum tryptase concentration must be measured, a high rate identifying patients with a high risk of side effects.

However experience shows that it is also necessary to carefully monitor patients subject to bee venom immunotherapy.


High burger consumption and child’s asthma risk

Theme : Asthma
Key-words : asthma, diet, hamburger, ISAAC study, ‘Mediterranean’ diet


It is one of the conclusions of the highly-reliable research team of the Epidemiology Institute of Ulm University (Germany) who studied the effect of diet on asthma prevalence and allergic sensitisation with children in the ISAAC international study (G.Nagel Thorax 2010 65 516-522).

Thus, between 1995 and 2005, studies were carried out in 29 centres in 20 European countries on 50 004 school children aged 8 to 12 ; with half of them (29 579) skin prick testing for usual allergens was performed. Parental questionnaires were used to collect information on diet and allergy.

The conclusions are as follows: fruit intake is statistically associated with low prevalence of asthma wheeze, in affluent as well as other countries. The same is true of fish consumption in affluent countries and cooked green vegetables in non-affluent countries.

However overall, high burger consumption was associated with high lifetime asthma prevalence, a prevalence much lower with fruit, green and fish consuming subjects.

It should be noted that none of the food items was associated with allergic sensitisation. Nor with atopic wheeze, except for fruit or fruit juice consumption.

On the whole the so-called ‘Mediterranean’ diet is associated with low prevalence of wheeze and asthma.

As a conclusion diet may be associated with asthma or asthma-like wheezing, regardless of any allergic sensitisation. These results speak strongly in favour of  the protective role against asthma, of a reasonable, balanced diet, rich in fruit and vegetables and low in meat : the ‘Mediterranean’ diet.


Pediatric asthma emergency visits and atmospheric pollution

Theme: Asthma
Key-words: child asthma, air pollutants, ozone


It is well-known that some air pollutants are responsible for asthma exacerbations in children. However this new survey conducted by several teams of the University of Atlanta (US) is an attempt to specify the lag between daily pollutant concentration and symptom emergence, by collecting paediatric asthma emergency department visits and/or admissions, identifying one or more of the main culprit pollutants, measuring their concentrations and appreciating the dose-response effect (M.Strickland et al AJRCCM 2010 182 307-316).

Thus in 1993-2004, 91 386 admissions or consultations by children aged 5-17 in 41 Atlanta area hospitals were counted, while at the same time the concentrations in gaseous and particulate pollutants were measured by urban stationary monitors with rate ratios adapted to the warm (May to October) and the cold (November to April) seasons. The data was subjected to Poisson generalised linear models in the framework of a cross-over analysis.

Results show that Ozone on the one hand, and primary pollutants from traffic sources (SO², NO, NO², CO) on the other, are directly and independently associated with asthmatic children’s consultations and emergency hospital admissions. Their effects are most blatant on the very day of their presence in the ambient atmosphere, even in low concentration.

Thus these pollutants are harmful for the asthmatic child, and quite rapidly, even when concentrations are low. This serious information should be taken into consideration by public health officials and all practitioners.

The harmful role of ozone is further underlined, in the same journal  (M.Stafoggia et al AJRCCM 2010 182 376-384), with elderly and vulnerable subjects (women, diabetics), by an inter-regional Italian team who reveal high mortality rates within this type of population, mainly from respiratory and cardiac diseases.


IgE sensitisation to Aspergillus and lung function in asthma

Theme: Asthma
Key-words: Aspergillus, aspergillosis, asthma, Aspergillus-specific IgE, sputum neutrophils


Allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is well-known as a frequent complication of ancient asthma ,characterized by a dual sensitisation ( IgE and IgG precipitating antibodies) , but all the biological and clinical consequences of the colonisation of  asthmatic  airways by Aspergillus are less clear.

An English team from Leicester lead by A.Fairs (AJRCCM 2010 16 July a.o.p) therefore undertook research on 79 asthmatic subjects classified into 3 groups: (1) IgE-sensitised (skin tests ?3mm and IgE?0.35 kU/L), (2)IgG-only-sensitised ( IgG ?40 mg/L) and (3) non-sensitised. These were compared to 14 healthy controls. Sputum culture towards detection of Aspergillus in all those patients was compared with clinical assessment data.

Results are as follows :

Culture was positive in 40 subjects from group 1 (IgE-sensitised) i.e. 63%, 13 of group 2 (IgG only) i.e. 39%, 26 of group 3 (non-sensitised) i.e. 31%, and 7% of controls.

Sensitised patients all had  lung function lower than the non-sensitised ones (post-bronchodilator FEV1 68% versus 88% of the predicted value), p?0.05 ; they also had more bronchiectasis (68% versus 35%)  p?0.05 and more sputum neutrophils (80.9% versus 49.5% p?0.01).

In a multilinear regression model, IgE sensitisation to Aspergillus and sputum neutrophil count are important predictors of lung function (p=0.016), followed by fungus culture and eosinophil cell count in sputum.

In conclusion, Aspergillus detection in asthmatics’ sputum is statistically associated with an IgE sensitisation,  neutrophilic airway inflammation and reduced lung function, with permanent airway fixed obstruction therefore appearing as a damaging effect of fungus colonisation.


Source:  CEFCAP
You may send comments on these brief news to cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr


Wiley-Blackwell launches a new online product delivery website, Wiley Online Library, which will replace the current website, Wiley InterScience. We invite you to implement and test journal access links that will be used to deliver journal access to the members and patrons from the EAACI website. All users will be redirected from Interscience to Wiley Online Library (WOL), although logins and passwords will stay the same. Enjoy enhanced functionality that adds value to your research. Click here to download the official flyer!
ALDER HEY – THE ROYAL LIVERPOOL CHILDREN'S NHS TRUST


Salary - £74,504 - £100,446

Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust is one of the largest and busiest children’s hospitals in Europe. The Trust has a world class reputation for providing care for sick children and a proud history of medical achievement and clinical innovation.

We are seeking applications for a permanent full time Consultant in Paediatric Allergy.  This newly funded post offers an exciting opportunity to join and support the further development of our Paediatric Allergy Service.   The successful applicant will provide and support a primarily outpatient and day case service within the Trust, and will work with the team to develop network based, integrated services both within the Trust and in partnership with secondary and primary care.

If you are interested and have the appropriate qualifications and are already on the General Medical Council’s Specialist Register, hold your CCST or are within six months of the appropriate CCST award at time of interview, we would be delighted to hear from you. 

For an informal discussion please contact Dr Tina Dixon on 0151-293-3641 or Dr Caroline Jones, Clinical Director for Medical Specialities on 0151 2284811 ext. 2221

If you are interested in applying to this post please go to www.jobs.nhs.uk quoting reference number RM452E.

The advert will close when sufficient applicants have been received.

In cases where a vacancy receives a high volume of applicants, we may bring the closing date forward. You are therefore advised to submit your completed application form as early as possible

If you have not been offered an interview within 6 weeks please accept that on this occasion you have not been successful. The Trust would like to thank you for your interest and look forward to receiving future applications from you.


Deadline for applidations:  30th of July 2010
Claude MOLINA & Franz MARRACHE

* Doxycycline or steroids in the treatment of nasal polyps
* Anaphylaxis and asthma
* Fibronectin and repair of asthmatics’ airway epithelium
* Anti-infliximab IgE, non IgE antibodies and induction of severe anaphylactic reactions
* Chronic urticaria in children Doxycycline or steroids in the treatment of nasal polyps

ENT teams of Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands and Australia have tried to compare the effects of oral corticosteroids (C)and Doxycycline (D) in treating chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (NP) in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 47 patients were concerned.

Cs are given for 20 days in decreasing doses from 32 to 8 mg/day. D is administered during the same period at the dose of 200 mg on the first day followed by 100 mg/day once daily ; the subjects were followed for 12 weeks and assessed by nasal endoscopy for nasal peak inspiratory flow, and markers of inflammation were measured in nasal secretions : ECP (Eosinophilic Cationic Protein), IgE (Immunoglobulin E), MMP9 (Matrix Metalloproteinase 9) and in blood samples : ECP, Eosinophils, IL5α.

Results : C and D each significantly decrease nasal polyp size compared with placebo.
On a clinical level, C and D improve nasal congestion with loss of smell, and rhinorrhea with rear nasal flow. But, as for C, those symptoms recur rapidly after the last dose, unless efficiency is maintained by local treatment.
On a biological level, C effects are maximal at week 3 and last till week 8 with decreasing ECP, IL5 and IgE in nasal secretions and dropping blood eosinophils followed by a swift rebound. However D effect is more moderate but lasts until week 12 with reduced levels of ECP, MM9 and myeloperoxydase (a marker of inflammation with neutrophils).
This shows that beside D’s well known anti-microbe effects, the authors observe an unexpected anti-inflammatory effect of the treatment, going as far as inhibiting the tissue destruction underlying in mucosal inflammation.
Finally, if C and D significantly reduce the inflammatory symptoms of nasal mucosa as well as local and blood markers, D is preferable to C for a long term reduction of polyps (instead of a recurrence after 2 months with C per os).
Therefore Doxycycline deserves a significant place in the treatment of nasal polyps (possibly in association with local Cs) for its contribution to avoiding or delaying as much as possible a surgical ablation.

Key words: chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, Doxycycline, steroids

Anaphylaxis and asthma

The epidemiologic aspect of the association between these two entities is tackled by two recent publications, a European one (A.Gonzalez-Perez et al de Barcelone JACI Mai 2010 1098-1104 ) from a British database, and an American one (C.Irribaren et al :Annals of Allergy, Asthma Immunol 2010 104 5 371-377) stemming from a major health organisation in North Carolina.
In the first study, based on a filing system dating back to 1985 which includes 177,000 asthmatics aged  10 to 79 who had presented an anaphylactic episode (due to food, medications, wasp or bee stings, latex and others, by order of frequency), the incidence rates are significantly found to be 21.28 per 100,000 person-years with the no-asthma subjects and 50.45 in the asthmatic cohort, i.e. approximately twice as high.
In the study conducted in the USA, the 1996-2006 comparison of a 526,406-strong cohort of asthmatics with a control cohort aged 24 on average, matched according to sex, age and ethnic origin, the incidence of an anaphylactic episode is 19.9 per 100,000 person-years with healthy subjects and 109.0 or 5 times as high with the asthmatics.
In the British cohort the risk appears statistically greater in severe asthmas than in the moderate cases ; the incidence rate is higher with women than men ; within the asthmatics, the patients at risk include subjects suffering from rhinitis, from concomitant eczema, and users of antihistamines or steroids. It is worth noting that not a single death occurred in that cohort.
In the American cohort, the trend toward an increased anaphylactic incidence can be observed in the case of severe asthma, and in relation with some food or bee or wasp sting allergy. On the contrary the evolution of the anaphylactic episode is not influenced by the degree of severity of the asthma.
True, as underlined by European and international experts, the description of the Anaphylactic Shock as a serious/severe, fast-appearing allergic accident, with predominance of skin and respiratory symptoms, and potentially lethal, should be adopted in all countries, which is far from the case (except for the treatment in which adrenaline (epinephrine) is unanimously prescribed).
But the lesson to be learnt from those two studies is that asthma is an important risk factor of an anaphylactic episode.

Key-words:
anaphylaxis, asthma

Fibronectin and repair of asthmatics’ airway epithelium

In an important experimental study based on asthmatic children’s airways, a group of Australian and American paediatricians and biologists (A.Kicic et al AJRCCM 2010 181 889-898) has analysed the repair process of airway epithelial cells (AEC) after an injury having caused a wound which is both structural and biochemical.
Normally, such a process involves the deposition by airway epithelial cells of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins promoting migration and adhesion to the site of injury, the dysregulation of which is liable to end in epithelial remodelling.
Hence, the authors compared, in vitro, with meticulous and sophisticated techniques, AECs from 36 two-to-sixteen year-old asthmatic children who had not taken any steroids for over one month, with that of 23 atopic subjects and 53 healthy non-atopic control subjects.
After induction of a mechanical wound, they measured the time and conditions necessary for the repair.
It was observed that the repair process duration is not different between the healthy and the atopic children, but it is statistically shorter than in asthmatics.
Besides, among the ECM proteins, it is the multifunctional glycoprotein Fibronectin (FN) which is the most reduced, both in expression and quantity.
To reinforce that point, silencing of FN expression in a non-asthmatic AEC inhibits wound repair, whereas addition of FN to an asthmatic AEC restores its reparative capacity.
On the whole, FN is necessary for the normal, post-wound AEC repair. It seems natural that the maintenance of healthy AEC, a barrier against environmental aggressions, needs fast repair, all the faster with asthmatics submitted to many exogenous and inflammatory factors. But the asthmatic person’s epithelial cells produce an insufficient quantity of FN. Finally, addition of exogenous FN restores AEC’s reparative capacity.

Key-words: fibronectin, airway epithelium, extra-cellular matrix, child asthma

Anti-infliximab IgE, non IgE antibodies and induction of severe anaphylactic reactions

Infliximab (Infl) is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against TNFα, which includes a cat animal protein sequence. It is used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases with immunologic mediation : ankylosing spondylitis (ASP), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), vasculitis (VAS) among others. Anaphylactic-like reactions linked to the development of specific IgG antibodies, aiming at the animal component, have been observed. That is why Vultaggio A. et al have tried to establish it (Allergy 2010 65 657-661).
71 patients suffering from ASP, RA, or VAS, were selected and Infl infused for 2 hours at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and then every 8 weeks. A pre-treatment was administered before each infusion, with an association of 25mg of hydroxyzine and 25mg of prednisone.
The control group was composed of 20 subjects suffering from the same diseases.
The 71 patients were discriminated by their therapeutic response into respondents and non-respondents, and also sorted according to the severity of their reaction to Infl.
11 out of the 71 patients treated presented anaphylactic-like reactions, variable in intensity : light (2), moderate (4), severe (5).
Anti-Infl antibodies appearing after the 2nd or 3rd infusion were detected in 8 of them, and in 2 others, otherwise non-respondent to treatment.
For 3 cases, the antibodies were specific IgEs, with positive skin tests, and for 3 others they were specific IgMs with negative skin tests. In 2 cases the antibodies were of the IgG type. For 3 cases the reaction mechanism could not be found.
On the whole, this study confirms the existence, during the treatment and apparently with no relation to the therapeutic response, of several isotypes of anti-Infl antibodies on top of the already detected IgGs, i.e. above all IgEs with positive skin tests and IgMs. It revealed a time relation between the appearance of these antibodies and that of the anaphylactic reaction.
Given the increasing use of those biological drugs, the possibility of detecting specific IgEs, either in the serum or on the skin, seems of a great interest for the prediction and prevention of this type of accident.

Key words: Monoclonal anti-TNF??anti bodies, Infliximab, Vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis, Anaphylactic reaction, IgE anti bodies.

Chronic urticaria in children

A group of Thai university paediatricians (Jirapongsananuruk  O. et al Ped.Allergy & Immunol 2010 21 508-514) has tried with  4-15 years-old children (94 of them) to pinpoint etiologies of a chronic urticaria (CU) defined by the apparition of typical symptomes, every day or nearly and for more than 6 weeks (excluding the cases of physical urticaria).
A priori and given the previous studies, 3 possible causes were clinically and biologically suspected: infection or parasitic infestation, collagen vascular disease, food allergy.
Eosinophilia was found in 23% of cases but parasites were only observed in 5% of the cases without clinical correlation, ESR was high in 13%. Anti-nuclear antibodies only in 2%. No clinical sign of vasculitis (usually causing the association of arthralgia and petechia or purpura). There was no change in  serum level of complement (CH50) or thyroid-stimulating hormone.
Anti-thyroglobulin, anti-microsomal antibodies, or auto-antibodies to IgE receptor (Fc€R1) were not detected.
As for food allergy, skin tests were positive in 33 subjects of which only 15 presented a significant clinical history (above all shrimps and shellfish sensitivity) ; among them 16 challenge tests turned out to be positive in 8 cases Only 4  remissions were observed, under child-adapted anti-histaminic treatment.
With all the children, the treatment comprised 4 stages, apart from avoidance of  allergen when identified :
At first Cetirizine© or  Loratadine (L) alone or associated to Hydroxysine (H) , C + L + Ranitidine® in stage 2, C + L + R + Montelukast (Singulair®) in stage 3, and finally C + L + prednisone in stage 4.
What conclusions should be drawn from this bio-clinical survey ?
1) there is little to expect from the various biological tests supposed to reveal a hypothetical auto-immunity; 2) obvious causes are rare; 3) food allergy must be systematically looked for as it can be efficiently treated; 4) the latest anti-histamines the symptomatic treatment which should be used with some interesting results; 5) whether in adults or children, urticaria is difficult to treat.
It should be noted that Levocetirizine (Xyzall®) was not used in this study.

Key-words: child chronic urticaria; food allergy; auto-immunity; anti-histamines



Source:  CEFCAP
You may send comments on these brief news to cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr


Title: Allergy in different systems

Place:
Athens, Greece

Date: 25th - 28th June 2010

For more information, click here!



Title: Evaluation and monitoring of inflammation in allergic diseases

Place: Vilnius, Lithuania

Date: 26th - 29th August 2010

More information will be available soon!



Title: Lifestyle interventions in Allergy & Asthma

Place: Cagliari coast, Sardinia

Date: 9th - 12th September 2010

More information will be available soon!



Title: Diagnostic approaches to the allergic patient

Place: Kusadasi, Turkey

Date: 30th September - 3rd october 2010

More information will be available soon!


Title: Allergy and Immunotherapy

Place: Berlin, Germany

Date: 21st - 23rd October 2010

More information will be available soon!



JMAs at the EAACI 2010 Congress


skevakiThe JMA Working Group promises many exciting opportunities in the 2010 Congress in London! All our JMAs know that they qualify for sizable discounts to be part of what is arguably our profession’s most stimulating educational opportunity, so make the most of it!

After the 10 postgraduate courses on Saturday, 5th June, you are all invited to our JMA Poster Session in the Platinum Lounge on Level 2. This is a great venue for informal discussions with junior and senior researchers about our scientific findings. We also have the prize announcement and afternoon tea before the Opening Ceremony and the Welcome Party.

On Sunday, 6th June, why not make the most of the weekend with a sunrise breakfast and 21 ‘meet the expert’ seminars, a series of clinical updates that involves examining the practical aspects of allergy management, and hands-on training sessions for allergy clinic techniques. Our JMA Case Reports session, with selected cases of top medical interest, is held in the afternoon in Premier Room 2.

The JMA Educational Session on Monday, 7th June, also takes place in Premier Room 2, where renowned EAACI members will provide important career tips, and the JMA Symposium with latest breakthroughs in science is in the South Gallery Room 19+20.

On Tuesday, 8th June, we hold our JMA Business Meeting (including prize-giving) late in the afternoon in the Platinum Suite 3, ahead of the JMA social event that evening. Don’t forget that your JMA registration includes a boat trip on the Thames with food and dancing. Other participants at the Congress may accompany us on this night out, depending on availability.

The EAACI awards free communication poster and abstract prizes at the end of the Congress and proudly profiles our winners. A JMA stand and JMA hotels will also be available.

All the latest news is available on www.eaaci.net. One other thing: please be aware that there might be slight changes in the allocation of rooms for all these events, so keep your eyes peeled for news at the Congress!

Looking forward to seeing you all in London!

Chrysanthi Skevaki
JMA Chairperson



 

Scope of EAACI examination:

Following the initiative of UEMS to standardize the training curriculum of allergologists/clinical immunologists in Europe (Allergy 59:579-588, 2004), the EAACI examination aims to further improve the standards of our specialty by providing a European examination in Allergology and clinical Immunology.
Such an examination could
• help to harmonize the educational level of Allergology-Clinical Immunology through-out Europe
• give an input for the standardization of the professional examinations for specialization in Allergology-Clinical Immunology among European national societies
• help small membership societies in the provision of a regular written examination at a constant high international level
• identify those colleagues able to fulfill the standards of knowledge for a continuous professional development

Admission to the examination:
The EAACI examination is open for members of the EAACI.
Clich here to become a member.

Mode of examination:
The examination will consist of a the Application Form for EAACI/UEMS Knowledge Examinationknowledge test with 100 multiple-choice questions. It will comprise questions in Allergology (70%) and basic/ clinical Immunology (30%), all in English language. The questions will be carefully formulated and reviewed by an international board of experts in allergology and clinical immunology, together with a specialized, professional institution (institute for medical teaching, IML, Bern, www.iml.unibe.ch), which also supervises the evaluation of the examination.
The background of required knowledge will be based on the currently existing modern textbooks, preferably but not exclusively in English. Furthermore, a list of recent publications related to the possible questions will be provided. The examination will not contain a practical part.

Costs of the examination*:
€ 250 - * reduction possible upon request

Evaluation of the EAACI examination:
The examination will be evaluated by IML (Institute for Medical Teaching, IML, Bern-http://www.iawf.unibe.ch/self-assessment/).
Information about the achieved points will be provided within 4 weeks after the exam. A certificate will be provided if the examination was passed successfully.

Legal aspects:
The registration for the examination implies the acceptance that the result of the examination is ultimate and no legal debate of the final decision is possible.

Application:
Time for application to the 3rd EAACI examination in London (Saturday, 05 June 2010 at 11.00) will be February 1st 2010 to April 1st, 2010. Application must be sent to:

EAACI Headquarters

Sladjana Scepan
Education and Specialty Manager
Genferstrasse 21
8002 Zurich
Switzerland
Telephone: +41 44 205 55 33
Fax: +41 44 205 55 39
E-Mail: sladjana.scepan@eaaci.net


Click here to download the Application Form!
Click here to download the Blueprint (a catalogue of topics to be learned for the exam)
Click here to download the List of Literature
Click here to download a Sample Question


Title of Post: Open call for a position of associate head in the CRP-Sante/Department of Virology, Allergology and Immunity/Laboratory of Immunogenetics and Allergology (LIGA). Luxembourg, Luxembourg.


Requirements: The applicant will have a doctorate of science (PhD) and /or of medicine (MD). A good knowledge in immunology is mandatory. Knowledge in clinical immunology and allergy is a plus. Post doctoral experience of at least 5 years, confirmed by an excellent CV is asked for. Experience and successful management of a research group with several research projects or participation in the management of a laboratory are requested. Excellent English is mandatory, good command of another language of the European Union is an asset.


Further information about the position and the procedures of application are to be found at www.crp-sante.lu

Closing Date: 31 March 2010

Contact Details:

Francois Hentges, MD
Laboratory of Immunogenetics and Allergology
CRP-Sante.
84, Val Fleuri. L-1526 Luxembourg
Luxembourg
hentges.francois@chl.lu


Numerous points that had emerged from the JMA Business meeting and JMA Working group meeting in Naples, June 2002, was presented and discussed in the Executive Committee by the JMA Chair.

Firstly I would like to inform you that we are now 1000 JMAs in the EAACI!

This year we have again tried to develop the JMA activities and find new ways for all JMAs to meet and to influence the life of the EAACI.

Minutes, JMA Working Group Meeting, Ghent-Brussels 2003

JMA Past Chair, Susanna Olsson reports on JMA activities in Paris 2003

News from the JMA chair

News from the JMA chair: Happy 2004!!

Meet the winners of the new 2009-2011 JMA Working Group

Chaired by Dr. Ulrike Raap and Dr. Miguel Borrego

Dr. Ulrike Raap: Clinical Fellowships: 50.000 Euro for this activity is provided. The information will be on the web page and all of you can apply. These fellowships are short term. European Exam in Clinical Immunology and Allergology will first time for the first time organized in Barcelona. This is a unique event for our Academy. It will contain 70% of Allergy questions and 30% of Clinical Immunology. Because of differences in education programs in allergy and immunology all needed material for getting ready to the exam will be presented at our web page, and at first this exam will be tested in working group representatives.

Dr. Miguel Borrego: It is very important to attract your attention to the point that this exam doesn’t replace any national or domestic exams in your country. If you are not recognized in your country as an allergist this exam doesn’t give you that right. In case if European academy certify you as an allergist-immunologist by completing this exam this certificate will not give you work permit in your country.

Dr. Ulrike Raap: You are all under 35 and have free junior membership, although EAACI sends e-mails with a request to confirm your membership for the next year. This is very important because we need to know how many junior members we do have. We kindly ask you to follow the link on the web site. Enter your number and password and confirm your membership every year. There was a question from the audience: In some countries (for example in Portugal) EAACI exam will precede the national exam because of the age of junior members.

Dr. Ulrike Raap: It doesn’t mean that you should be full Allergologist already to take this exam. If you are completed any course in allegology and are still in training you can take this exam.

Dr. Miguel Borrego: If you want to complete this exam you can and then you can also put it in your CV. This will give you some extra points to apply for a good position. As far as the work of dermatology section is concerned, the postgraduate course was very good this year.

Dr. Elena Borzova: There were several activities, and I would like to thank all participants as this course was very difficult to organize because the obligatory fee that was very high for juniors. I want to thank Ulrike, and all working group because they agreed to spend some of our budget money to grants to give free participation to some of juniors. And it is important to discuss in Executive Committee the questions of fees, their sizes for the next meetings. This course was very practical very interactive, and was interesting for the participants. And the news from the dermatology section: We have changes in the section new chairperson and secretary, and new board.

Dr. Chrysanthi Skevaki: We didn’t have business meeting of web site creators this year. We plan to divide our web site to three parts. I will the Coordinating website editor, Ulrike Raap the Ssientific website editor, and Erikka Valovirta the Patients website editor. This will occur in several months. There will be patient’s site, scientific site and clinical. Our site will be the first one in Europe with CME accreditation. There are going to be web casts with slides and questionnaires with single choice questions.

Dr. Marcin Kurowski: We made Davos meeting in February last year. Our latest news: we will have Davos meeting in Austria this year. The topic will be “skin allergy and immunotherapy” and you can send abstract and on the base of quality of abstracts there will be some travel grants.

Dr. Miguel Borrego: The section of pediatric. There will be a meeting in food allergy it is not confirmed yet made by dermatology and pediatrics sections. All members of sections can apply for a certificate in pediatric allergy.

Dr. Ulrike Raap: Hope that all of you are satisfied with JMA hotel this year. Today in the evening we have social event in the night club.

Dr. Miguel Borrego: I want to ask all JMA`s If you have suggestions for the workshops or you have interesting topics to discuss, you can write an e-mail to one of us and then we’ll discuss your suggestions within the group. Our e-mail addresses are available at EAACI site JMA section.

Dr. Ulrike Raap: In Barcelona there will be a new thing: clinical practical courses for 25 minutes each: Each course will explain one method for example spirometry: one junior will prepare syllabus and senior will give a lecture, and distribute corrected syllabus. These courses are charged of 20 euro. But if you attend all practical courses, and will pass small exam based on the material you will get instant refund of this sum. This year we were obliged to have a fee of 50 Euro for practical course. We had discussing on this question within the working group and decided that it was too high price for juniors that is very difficult to pay on your own. We gave 10 grants from our budget money. The next year the situation with fees is much better. If you have in mind some specific clinical skills that can be demonstrated during these practical courses please send this information to your section representative. There was a suggestion from the audience to make junior poster section at the separate day. That will attract more attention of seniors.

Dr. Miguel Borrego: We are already doing attempts to make posters review process more fare, we also want to try to divide posters within the groups to clinical and basic. This will prevent reviewer from comparing clinical and very basic works trying to collect the winner of the award.

The 8th Award was presented by the President of the European Academy, Professor Roy Gerth van Wijk, to Dr. Georgina Xanthou during the XXVII Congress of the Academy in Barcelona, Spain.

The full scientific program of Infection & Allergy EAACI Interest Group in Barcelona 2008.

In this section, original documents preapared for the Immunotherapy Group by the experts will be displayed

 

Preventive  capacity of subcutaneous immunotherapy
E. Valovirta, MD


The scope of this review is to highlight important and interesting articles about the preventive aspects and capacity of allergen specific subcutaneous injection immunotherapy.

The preventive capacity of  subcutaneous immunotherapy in suppression of the development of new IgE-sensitisations and the progression of the allergic disease into more severe one is an interesting topic in the field of allergen specific immunotherapy.

Allergen-specific immunotherapy,the subcutaneous administration of increasing doses of allergen extracts, is the only specific and curative approach towards the treatment of IgE-mediated  allergy. Immunotherapy affects the natural course of allergic disease, and induces prolonged clinical remission when the treatment is continued for several years, which has raised the question of whether it should be considered earlier in the management of allergic diseases.

Ola! welcome to our meeting!

Agenda

View the 2004 CME Events List.

1995Chrysanthi Skevaki

Allergy Research Laboratories
Second Dpt of Pediatrics
“P & A Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital
University of Athens
41 Fidipidou str - 11527 Athens - Greece
Tel:+30-210-7776964 (ext14)
Fax:+30-210-7777693
cskevaki@allergy.gr

 

I have been an active member of the EAACI since I embarked on my PhD studies. I became a member of the JMA WG in 2005 after an open election, and have taken on subsequent appointments as webmaster of the Infection and Allergy Interest Group, as a member of the CME committee, as a member of the Communication Council, and finally as EAACI Website Co-ordinating Editor since September 2007. This position gave me, among many other opportunities to enhance the work of the EAACI, the possibility of working to serve the best interests of JMAs in a number of ways.

My current employment is as a resident in Laboratory Medicine and post-doctoral associate in the Allergy Research Laboratories of the Second Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens. My main area of scientific interest is the association between infection and allergic manifestation.

 

As the new JMA Chairperson, I would like to dedicate my time and energy:

 

  • to maintaining and extending achievements by the current JMA WG Board and predecessors, including activities conducted during the annual EAACI Congress, and the system of grants and awards to young members of the Academy;
  • to supporting continuous education and training of all EAACI JMA members through increased participation in Allergy Schools, online CME accredited courses, and provision of exchange fellowships;
  • to promoting deeper involvement by JMAs in European scientific collaborations and projects;
  • to establishing mentorship modules which would facilitate career orientation for all JMAs;
  • to intensifying connections between EAACI JMAs and the corresponding sections of other European, U.S., and international scientific societies;
  • to encouraging and supporting the involvement of more JMAs in EAACI- related activities and decision-making; and especially
  • to remaining open and welcoming to the expression of new ideas and suggestions through questionnaires, polls, etc.
Nikos Papadopoulos

Katharina Bluemchen
Germany

Dept. of paediatric pneumology/immunology,
University Hospital Charite, Virchow
Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin
nina.bluemchen@charite.de

Education
1990-1999 Medical School at the University of Cologne, Germany and St. Mary´s Hospital Medical School, London, Great Britain

1994 Dissertation: ''Characterization and modulation of immune responses to peanut antigens in mice",
Dept. of Immunology, Imperial College, London and
Division of respiratory medicine, University of Edinburgh,

1998-1999 Intern at the Dept. of Pediatric Pneumology/Immunology, Charite,
Berlin

2000 -Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the research center, Charite, Dept. of Allergy/Immunolgy

Research Interests
Mouse models for food allergy and asthma, new preventative and therapeutic options of asthma, immune modulation, tolerance

623Luís Miguel Borrego
Portugal
Dept. of allergology/immunology,
Dona Estefânia Hospital
Rua Jacinta Marto, Lisboa
miguel.borrego@sapo.pt

Born in Lisbon, Portugal, 06/04/1973

Education

Degree in Medicine, 1997 - Medical School at the University of Lisbon

Degree in School Health (Master), Medical University of Lisbon, 2003

Degree in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, 2005- Dona Estefânia Hospital

Assistant of Anatomophisiology, Superior School of Health Science and Technology, Lisbon, 2001-2005.

Assistant of Immunology-Sciences Medical School of Lisbon.

Assistant of Immunology -Superior School of Health Technologies, Lisbon.

Fellowship at Institute oh Child Health-Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, from September 2003 till January 2004 under coordenation of Professor Janet Stocks, about infant and pre-school lung function tests.

Fellowship at Brompton Hospital, London, Pediatric Pneumology under supervision of Professor A. Bush.


Research Interests

Current research projects in Infant and Pre-school lung function.

Scientific societies

Portuguese Medical Council, nº37262

Portuguese Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SPAIC )

European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI )

General Medical Council (GMC), nº6078227.

Portuguese Society of Pneumology - interest group of Pediatic Lung Function Tests

1995Chrysanthi Skevaki

Allergy Research Laboratories
Second Dpt of Pediatrics
“P & A Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital
University of Athens
41 Fidipidou str - 11527 Athens - Greece
Tel: +30-210-7776964 (ext14)
Fax: +30-210-7777693
E-mail: cskevaki@allergy.gr

I studied medicine at the Semmelweis University of Medicine, Budapest, Hungary. For the last three years, I have been working as a scientific collaborator in the Infectious Diseases Unit (Prof D A Kafetzis) of the Second Department of Pediatrics of the University of Athens. During this time, I gained interest in pulmonary medicine and more specifically in the field of interactions between infections and asthma. Therefore, during the last year I have started a PhD project, which deals with the influence of rhinovirus infection upon the expression and production of molecules associated with apoptosis, in the context of airway remodeling in asthma. This project is conducted in the Allergy Research Laboratories of the Second Department of Pediatrics of the University of Athens, under the supervision of Dr N G Papadopoulos.
1004Barcelona 2008, Spain

XXVII EAACI Congress
07-11 June 2008
Barcelona, Spain
CME Accredited
Annual Business Meeting, Götebörg 2007 Minutes from the Section on Pediatrics Business Meeting held in Götebörg. Sunday, June 10th 2007, 5:15 - 6:15 p.m. § 1.Present: Lone Agertoft, Catarina Almquist, Marina Atanaskovic- Markovic, Agueda Amelia Barbosa Matos, Kirsten Beyer, Artur Bonito Vitur, Marlene Borschel, Daniel Caillot, Liliane De Swert, Armando Di Fazio, Josè Carlos Aroso Dos Reis Cidrais Rodrigues, José Lopes Dos Santos, Sten Dreborg, Anthony EJ Dubois, Alessandro Fiocchi, Frank Friedrichs, Alberto Manuel Gomes Casta, Christoph Gruber, Susanne Halken, Tine K. Hansen, Gunilla Hedlin, Marteen Otto Hoekstra, Arne Host, Jonathan Hourihane, Kaja Julge, Thomas Keil, Inger Kull, Stefania La Grutta, Susanne Lau, Yael Levy, Karin C. Lodrup Carlsen, Lennard Nalsson, Carla Novais, Photini Papageorgiou, Cristina Pascual, Hostas Priftis, Ana Maria Ribeiro, Graham Roberts, Rodrigo Soares Rodrigues Alves, Roger Rolland, Alexandra Santos, Nihat Sapan, Frans Timmermans, Berber Ulieg Baerska, Erkka Valovirta, Vesna Vodusek Pleunik, Hartmnt Vogt, Andrea Von Berg, Magnus Wickman, Simona Eva Zitnik. Philippe Eigenmann, Antonella Muraro. Apologies: Johannes Forster, Gideon Lack, Antonio Nieto, Bodo Niggemann, Fabienne Rancé . § 1.Report from the Chairman Philippe Eigenmann PE gave a short summary of the full report available on the EAACI Section website (http://www.eaaci.net/site/content.php?artid=1279 ). In particular, great interest has been devoted to post-graduate and continuous education in pediatric allergy both for pediatric allergists and primary care physicians. The last year has also seen the Section organize and participate in several successful meetings and events, including the congress in Vienna, two PAPRICA sessions and the Food Allergy Training Course in Denmark. Other activity of the Section has included the birth of the “EAACI-Clemens von Pirquet Foundation”, which has the aim of supporting education and research in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology, and the completion of the position paper of the Taskforce on Anaphylaxis in Children. § 2 & 3 Registration of members present by name and address; further topics § 4 Election of new board members Five members are leaving the board (GL, FR, FF, PE and LMB). There are therefore four positions as the junior member was replaced by an internet vote in the Junior Member Section. There are six candidates: Maarten Hoekstra (NL), Graham Roberts (UK), Jonathan Hourihane (Ireland), Kirsten Beyer (D), Susanne Lau (D), Karin Cecile Lodrup Carlsen (N). PE informed the Section members that, as two candidates are from the same country and institution (Charité), it was agreed by the Board that, according to EAACI by-laws and policy, the vote should result in the election of only one of the two candidates. The election committee is formed by Arne Host (Chairman), Frank Friederich and Sten Dreborg. The results were as follows: Maarten Hoekstra (36), Graham Roberts (35), Jonathan Hourihane (37), Kirsten Beyer (21), Susanne Lau (24), Karin Cecile Lodrup Carlsen (33). The new board members are therefore: Maarten Hoekstra, Graham Roberts, Jonathan Hourihane, Karin Cecile Lodrup Carlsen. The new Junior Member is Mara Xatzipsalti. The Chairman welcomed the new members and thanked the old members for their fruitful collaboration over the past term. The new Chairman and Secretary will be elected by the new Board. The candidate for the position of Chairman is Antonella Muraro (I) and for Secretary the candidate is Susanne Halken (DK). § 5. Financial report for the Section (AM) In 2006 the Section spent 5723,76 euro for ongoing activity. § 6. Education in Europe (Arne Host, José Lopes Dos Santos) The Education and Training Committee in Pediatric Allergy (ETC-PA), has continued evaluation of pediatric allergists fulfilling the requirement outlined in the Training Syllabus for European Pediatric Allergists. In the last year, 96 colleagues from Spain received their diploma of Pediatric Allergists. In addition, 12 pediatric allergists from Switzerland have also fulfilled the requirements and were provided with their diploma. Currently, the curricula of colleagues from France, Portugal and Italy are evaluated. We strongly encourage pediatric allergists from other European countries to apply for their diploma. Application should be made through their national delegates. The list can be obtained from Jose Lopes Dos Santos, the Secretary of ETC-PA. In the near future, main training centers in various European countries will be evaluated and accredited. For more information on the Paprica Symposia see Chairman's report. § 7. Clemens von Pirquet Foundation for Pediatric Allergy (see Chairman's report) § 8. Financial report for the Foundation (Bodo Niggeman) The Foundation was founded with the remaining assets from ESPACI. The balance on 31.12.2006 was 240'434.23 €. The two financial auditors (Andrea von Berg and Susanne Lau) confirm that the finances were correctly handled. § 9. Future meetings and other activities AM reported that the joint meeting with the ERS-Pediatric Assembly and the Portuguese Allergy Society will be held on October 20-23, 2007 in Lisbon-Estoril Coast. The second announcement has been distributed here in Goteborg. The 2nd edition of the Food Allergy Training Course, organized together with the Section on Dermatology and the Food Allergy Interest Group, will take place in Cork (Ireland) in autumn 2007. As there were many more applicants in 2006 than places available, we strongly encourage early application for the Cork training course. The Taskforce on Anaphylaxis has completed the position paper that will be available online in Allergy in June and will be published in print form before the Autumn. A new taskforce on the Allergic Child at School has been approved by the EAACI Ex-Com with the aim of providing guidelines for dealing with allergies at school. The taskforce will have its first meeting here in Goteborg. § 10. Further topics Sten Dreborg pointed out that it might be preferable to send the information regarding the activity of the Section directly to the members via email as well as posting it on the website. § 11. Next Annual Business Meeting The next Annual Business meeting will be held at the next EAACI Congress June 7-11, 2008 in Barcelona. Padua, July 2007 Philippe Eigenmann Antonella Muraro Chairman Secretary

Minutes of the Business Meeting of the ENT Section of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology held in Barcelona, Spain Thursday June 10th 2008 15.30 – 17.00 in the Centre de Convencions Internacional de Barcelona (CCIB), Room 211 & 212

86 members of the section attended the meeting.

Glenis Scadding, Chair of the section welcomed the attendees.

Livije Kalogjera, Secretary of the section, introduced Pro and Con session: Rhinosinusitis should be treated with antibiotics – where Claus Bachert represented the pro side, and Glenis Scadding represented the con side. Majority of the auditorium voted for the pro side.

1. Apologies for absence were received from Jean Michele Klossek.

2. The Minutes of the last business meeting held in Gothenburg, Sweden June 10th 2007 were approved.

3. Glenis Scadding gave a report of the Chair. She explained that membership of the ENT section was rising steadily from 221 in Amsterdam to 315 in Barcelona, which represents 43% increase in 5 years. Some 49 countries were represented, Germany and Turkey have more than 30 members, Belgium, The Netherlands, Sweden, and Spain have between 15 and 30 members each. The ENT section is still just the smallest section of EAACI but is rapidly catching up on Dermatology. Livije Kalogjera, Secretary of the section, reported on the scientific programme for this and future EAACI Congresses. At the present EAACI meeting the ENT section was responsible for the following meetings/courses. • Postgraduate course 2. Saturday 7th (9:00-16:30) Diagnostic tools and methods in Rhinology • Symposium 7. Sunday 8th (13:30-15:00), Room 211/212 Relationship between objective and subjective outcome measures in airway disease • GAZLEN Symposium Monday 9th (15:30-17:00), Room 115 Advances in allergy: Results from GA2LEN network • Symposium 13 Monday 9th (10:30-12:00), Room 111 Phenotyping chronic rhinosinusitis • Workshop 20 Monday 9th (15:30-17:00), Room 115 New therapeutic approaches to nasal polyps • Workshop 24 Turesday 10th (10.30-12.00) Room 115 Nose and Ear • Practical Course 9 Monday, 9th (13.30-15) Room 119 Ear, nose and throat at a glance: rhinoscopy, radiology, nitric oxide, rhinomanometry, endoscopy In the forthcoming EAACI meeting in Warsaw 2008 symposium MS1, MS2, MS3 have been proposed. • Symposium MS1 Global airway disease • Symposium MS2 Difficult-to-treat chronic rhinosinusitis • Symposium MS3 Unmet needs in the treatment of upper airway disease • Workshop 1 Co-morbidities of rhinitis

Future meetings will be held as follows: SERIN 2008 Dubrovnik EAACI 2009 Warsaw EAACI 2010 London EAACI 2011 Istanbul Other 2007/2008 activities have included GA2LEN activities, dissemination campaign: AR leads to asthma published in Rhinology 2007, Claus Bachert has reported on the research and activities done in the Workpacakge 2.7.2 (Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps), Workpackage HANNA on aspirin hypersensitivity with a publication on Diagnosis of Aspirin hypersensitivity in JACI E-published in May 2007.

There is also a 2007 ARIA update with guidelines published as an Allergy supplement and an ARIA pocket guide, as well as 2008 ARIA Update, published in Allergy April Supplement..

An update of EP³OS has also been made by a committee involving members of the ENT section.

It was published in the June supplement issue of Rhinology, and with a review in Allergy. The complete document and is free on web of Rhinology journal and on EAACI ENT section website. Wytske Fokkens reported on the newly formed EPOS website: www.ep3os.org, where EPOS pocket guide for GP and ENT are available in 8 languages. Further EPOS dissemination is being done in Europe, Latin America and Asia. The section are grateful to an unrestricted grant from Schering Plough of 130,000 Euros to enable this activity. Other published dissemination may be found in Acta ORL Esp 2007 (fall issue), Rev Rhinol 2008, and a review paper in Primary Care Respiratory Journal 2008 (Primary care guidelines).

Joaquim Mullol has reported on the ENT Section of EAACI Taskforce: Diagnostic tools and methods in rhinology”, which has produced 2 PG courses on EAACI Congresses, and position paper diagnostic tools is being developed. Members of the ENT section actively participated with the symposia in following meetings: Congress of European Federation of ORL Societies (EUFOS) -Vienna, Austria June 2007-06-20;

Greek ENT Society meeting (Rhinology) Kalyni, Greece October 2007; International Rhinologic Society meeting (IRS) Venice, Italy December 2007 and European Rhinologic Society Congress (ERS-ISIAN) Crete, Greece June 2008

Members of the section are warmly invited to attend the 7th Symposium on Experimental Rhinology and Immunology of the Nose (SERIN) which is being organised by Livije Kalogjera for November 2008 in Dubrovnik (Croatia), who reported on the EAACI grant for the meeting, which will enable JMA travel grants, venue, main topics and SERIN website, www.hdorl.net/serin2008, where registration and abstract submission may be made.

Carlos Nunes reminded everyone about the ENT section website for which he is responsible.

Glenis Scadding thanked everyone for attending this meeting and welcomed us to the next ENT section meeting on the SERIN symposium in Dubrovnik, 13-15th November 2008.

Summary of Current Activities and Future Plans: The IG’s current and 2008 activities: 1. The second PGC “hands-on” on Aerobiology has been held in Barcelona last June and it was fully self-financed, being microscopes renting paid by a sponsor and pollen trap use and expedition paid by Lanzoni. 2. The first kick-off meeting of the Task Force EAACI-ERS (European Respiratory Society) on the “Effects of Climate change on respiratory allergic diseases and on asthma prevalence” has been held in Barcelona the 8th of June. Some decisions have been taken and some documents are in preparation. The next meeting will be held in Berlin the 5th of October 2008 in the framework of the ERS annual meeting. 3. Both Chairman and Secretary joined meetings as invited speakers, always mentioning IG activities. 4. Secretary joined the scientific committees of the 3rd International Meeting on Molecular Allergology (ISMA) in Salzburg and of the 1st International Meeting on Ragweed in Budapest. 5. Secretary (as Italian delegate) is involved in the management committee of the COST Action ES0603: “Assessment of production, release, distribution and health impact of allergenic pollen in Europe (EUPOL)” financed by EU Framework Programme. 6. IG served as platform for submitting an important European project on detection of allergens in ambient air. The project passed the first selection and it is under further revisions. A supporting letter from EAACI ExCom has been requested. The IG’s future plans for 2009: 1. To finalize the final documents of the Task Force within June 2009, in order to submit them to the ExComs and, then, to scientific journals (possibly Allergy and ERJ) 2. To organize the third PGC on Aerobiology for London 2010. 3. IG will be continue to be involved (through personal participation of Secretary as national delegates) in the COST EUPOL, looking for possible collaborations and common activities. 4. To plan a summer school for 2010 on “Environmental Allergology” (tentative title) to be organized in collaboration with the COST EUPOL which already officially approved the proposal, providing and supporting speakers and students. 5. To collect information about studies done inside EAACI context about Aerobiology and Pollution. 6. To promote having at least one EAACI member per national society member inside the Interest Group, to share information regarding pollution and pollinosis among different countries. 7. To connect with indoor allergen studies with other IG and Section of EAACI 8. To continue participating in the contents of the EAACI website with texts and information and deliver it ready for colleagues and patients over the EAACI website

Goteborg 2007

 

The Agenda of the IG Annual Business Meeting in Barcelona 2008.

Annual Report 2008

 

Eighty pre- and postdoctoral scientists and young EAACI members attended the Third EAACI Davos Meeting organized by GA2LEN, the Academy's Immunology and Pediatric Sections, and the Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research (SIAF).

Kurt Blaser and Cezmi Akdis welcomed us to Davos, which was as enchanting as ever. Peter Krammer, Patrick Holt, Kim Bottomly, David Gray, Raif Geha and Markus Manz delivered keynote lectures on ‘Innate immunity', ‘Adaptive immune responses' and ‘Animal models of allergic inflammation'. These were followed by mini-symposia in which promising young scientists presented and discussed their work.

The afternoon hours were given over to winter sports, and many junior members took advantage of the excellent conditions on the Jakobshorn and Parsenn slopes. After dinner, we had some unforgettable poster sessions accompanied by desserts in the bar and lengthy discussions.

T he third EAACI Davos Meeting was truly outstanding as regards science, weather and skiing.

Paul van Cauwenberge announced that form now on the Davos meeting will take place every year. The 2006 Davos meeting will be organized by EAACI and GAALEN in Garmisch-Partenkirchen.

Philippe Gevaert, JMA Chair

508

Group Picture from Davos

Aims, Composition and Procedures for the EAACI JMA Working Group

Date: 8th June 2003
Venue: XXII Paris Congress


Chairman: Prof. Gennaro D’Amato (Naples, Italy)

Secretary: Dr. Marta Orta (Pamplona, Spain)

 

The business meeting was held during EAACI Paris Congress, the 8th June at 12.30 h. The number of participants was about 20 people who left e-mail addresses to be in contact for participating in future tasks. D’Amato and Orta welcomed everybody and reported the activity held from Naples Congress 2002. The assistants shortly described their professional activity within the field of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and which is their special interest in Aerobiology and Pollution.

 

The group proceeded afterwards to the election of new Chairman and Secretary following EAACI instructions. Both Gennaro D’Amato as Chairman and Marta Orta as Secretary were unanimously re-elected up to 2005.

 

The scientific program developed was the following:

* Presentation of the WHO Document on ''Allergies and phenology'', by Sergio Bonini, who described the document and suggested to visit the website www.euro.who.int/globalchange to obtain more information.

* Sigfried Jaeger talked about European Aerobiology Networks, giving everybody a whole view about the networks that can be consulted to be well informed about the interaction between aerobiology and pollution.

* Dimitros Gioulekas and his group from Greece gave an overview of their works about the usefulness of developing an aerobiological network for people assisting and participating in Athens 2004 Olimpic Games, information that can be consulted and completed on the website www.aeroallergen.gr

* Lorenzo Cecchi from Florence (Italy) talked on behalf of his group about their works in relationship between meteorological factors and hospital admissions for asthma, joining the brief summary which follows:

The relationship between asthma and weather has been poorly studied and published data are controversial. Until now, daily average values of temperature, relative humidity and other meteorological parameters have been used to investigate their impact on asthma attacks, but separately. An important limit lies in the lack of studies evaluating the influence on hospital admissions determined by combined effects of the meteorological factors.
Furthermore, meteorological data have been so far handled by doctors instead of meteorologists representing this another possible limit. Given that, a group composed by biometeorologists and doctors in Florence has been formed; the biometeorologists work for the Institute of Biometeorology (National Research Council) and the doctors are part of the Interdepartmental Centre of Bioclimatology (University of Florence). We proposed a new approach in the studies on the influence of weather discomfort conditions on hospital admissions due to asthma attacks, using biometeorological indices. These indices are represented by tables or simple empiric equations that provide results expressed as "apparent temperature", that is a measure of well being or discomfort due to the combination of some
meteorological parameters (i.e. air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed). The most and widest used are Steadman's Apparent Temperature Index
and Wind chill Index.
A new research to evaluate the influences of the passage of air masses with different origins on hospital admissions has been also started. The group is interested in creating an european network among people investigating the combined effects of meteorological and aerobiological factors and pollutants. These studies could represent the background for developing environmental watch/warning systems for asthmatic patients.

 

* The secretary hasn’t received similar summaries from the other participants.

 

The main new projects for next year are:

- Ask the Executive Committee for a Task Force to prepare a position paper on ''Pollen grains and air pollution in Europe as causes of respiratory allergy''

- To create an award for a junior researcher or new group of work on the topic of Aerobiology and air pollution.

 

The activities carried out on behalf of the group in Paris Congress were a Meet the Professor Seminar chaired by Gennaro D’Amato and two Poster Discussion Sessions: ''Outdoor and Indoor pollution'' and ''Aerobiology and allergens'' moderated each by Gennaro D’Amato and Marta Orta.
All these sessions were followed by very participative people interested on topics treated. The posters presented were of a high quality and very well defended by their authors. In the business meeting people were enhanced to attend all the sessions related.

 

We join the committee report template with budget for 2004.

 

The Business Meeting was closed by the Chairman at 13.30h

 

Paris, 8th June, 2003,

Gennaro D’Amato Marta Orta

Chairman Secretary

 

11814-year PhD Programme in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma

 

This provides an outstanding opportunity for high-calibre PhD students to train in areas of basic and clinical science that have direct relevance to the development of novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of asthma. For details of the Centre visit www.asthma-allergy.ac.uk.

 

Applications are now invited for PhD studentships (1 plus 3-year) to start in October 2007. Students will spend the first year taking a full-time MSC in Immunology at King’s or Imperial obtaining a foundation in cellular, molecular and clinical immunology, including a 3-month laboratory-based mini-research project within the Centre. In year two, students embark upon a full-time PhD project from the following:

 

1. Role of BAFF/APRIL in IgE switching in nasal mucosa

2. X-ray crystallographic studies and knowledge-based drug design of GSNOR inhibitors.

3. Mechanism of glucocorticoid-mediated repression of cytokine gene expression.

4. Pharmacological induction of IL-10 secreting T regulatory cells in asthma.

5. The role of respiratory tract dendritic cells in allergic airway disease.

6. Control of inflammatory responses in the respiratory mucosa by local germinal centre-like structures: the new immunology.

7. IGE receptor CD23 as a target for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease.

8. T cell receptor structure and affinity in antigen specific Th2 responses.

9. Involvement of superantigens in steroid-resistant asthma.

10. Modulation of anti-viral immunity by allergic inflammation in the airway.

11. Mechanisms of antiviral/anti-inflammatory activity of macrolide antibiotics in asthma.

12. Mechanisms of rhinovirus-induced acute exacerbations in a chronic asthma model.

13. Role of Vitamin D in protection against rhinovirus induced asthma exacerbations.

14. T cell receptor structure and affinity in antigen specific Th2 responses.

15. Cross talk between innate and adaptive immunity in lung inflammation.

16. The molecular Biology of Novel Chemoattractant receptors.

17. The role of novel T cell subset-specific proteins in a mouse model of RSV disease.

18. Biophysical and functional characterisation of chemokines expressed in human lung.

19. Crystallographic studies of interleukin-17E and its receptor.

20. Germinal centre reactions in allergic inflammation.

 

 

All PhD projects involve collaboration between at least two internationally competitive and well-funded laboratories at King’s and Imperial. Cutting-edge topics cover the whole range of immunobiology related to allergic inflammation in asthma including structural chemistry, bioinformatics, molecular biology, cellular mechanisms and integrated pulmonary physiology approaches to translational biology. Successful Candidates will be joining a vibrant community of over 50 postgraduate and postdoctoral scientists who share resources and expertise within the Centre.

 

Stipend is at standard MRC rate. Home/EU status students only are eligible and applicants should have or expect to get an upper second or first class degree (or equivalent) in any area of biological sciences. To apply, send CV and names of two referees and a statement on why you would like apply to our 4-yr PhD programme to Professor Tak H Lee at tak.lee@kcl.ac.uk.

 

Tel ++ 44 20 7188 1943

Fax ++ 44 20 7403 8640.

 

Closing date is Friday 19th January 2007

 

Equality of opportunity is College policy

 

Prevention of asthma exacerbations: one size does not fit all!

 

Not long ago, regular use of inhaled steroids was the one and only, straightforward answer to the question of what is the optimal preventive treatment of asthma, including exacerbations. So overwhelmingly effective and preponderant were the steroids that world-renown scientists declared that there will be no new therapy on asthma for at least some decades. However, they proved wrong. From different perspectives and most importantly, using different marketing strategies, new proposals have appeared, either using new substances or, most interestingly, exploring novel administration strategies.

 

From a physician’s point of view, having more weapons to fight a disease is certainly a benefit which one welcomes. There is, however, a problem: each of these interesting and promising strategies are backed-up and individually promoted by a single drug company. In every relevant Congress nowadays, one will face several satellite meetings, each one of which would strongly support, almost prove, the truthfulness of the particular treatment by which it is sponsored. There is no doubt that this is how our world works; health services cannot escape market laws. Nevertheless, there might be space for improvement: during the recent EAACI-GA2LEN Summer School in Greece, experts were asked to present the different approaches on prevention of asthma exacerbations during the same session, in a more or less ‘debate’ format. The webcast of this rather unusual session can be found in eaaci.net’s resource center, so that everybody can draw their own conclusions.


In my case, I confirmed an old suspicion: until the arrival of pharmacogenetics, we will have to add skill and magic on top of the drugs to optimally treat our patients. And in this respect, pluralism is invaluable.

 

Nikos Papadopoulos

 

EAACI Website Editor

Asthma & Sports: a mighty co-existence.

998Research Councils Fellowship in Asthma and Allergy

Applications are invited for the post of Research Councils UK Fellowship in Asthma and Allergy (Non-clinical Lecturer grade) in the Department of Asthma, Allergy and Respiratory Science at King's College London (Guy's Campus). The post is for 5 years in the first instance.

For further information about this post, se the attached please send an A4 size self-addressed envelope to:
Mrs Leela Jones, Personnel Department, 4th Floor, Capital House, 42 Weston Street, London SE1 3QD or send an e-mail to Leela on medicine1@kcl.ac.uk or obtain from www.kcl.ac.uk/jobs

Please quote reference number A2/MA/675/06 in all correspondence.

Closing date for applications: 2nd November 2006.

Click here to view the pdf!

In order to allow EAACI to influence and keep updated information on matters related to allergy and clinical immunology, it has been decided to create “Interest Groups”.


a. An Interest Group should represent an area of general interest within allergology that is not well covered by any one of the EAACI Sections.

b. Any EAACI Member can propose that an Interest Group is formed, but the decision to form an Interest Group is taken by the EAACI Executive Committee.

c. Only EAACI Members, Junior Members, Affiliate Members or Junior Affiliate Members can be members of an Interest Group.

d. An Interest Group is led by a chairman who is appointed by the EAACI Executive Committee for one term coinciding with that of EAACI Officers. The IG appoints a Secretary. The IG Chairman and Secretary may be re-appointed for a second period to either post, but may not hold office continuously (in either post) for more than four years.

e. Nobody may be a Chairman or Secretary of more than one Interest Group. Interest Group Chairmen/Secretaries should not be current members of either the Executive Committee or a Section Board. However, anyone can participate in business and scientific meetings of several Interest Groups.

f. Interest Groups are encouraged to arrange business meetings for their members during each EAACI Congress. A suitable room will be offered free of charge.

g. An Annual Report of the activities of an Interest Group should be presented to the EAACI Executive Committee at the Executive Committee Meeting at the EAACI Congress.

h. The scientific activities of an Interest Group should be channelled through the EAACI Scientific Programme Committee.

i. The EAACI Executive Committee, and the EAACI Sections, should rely on the expertise of the Interest Group in matters of interest to the Interest Group.

j. The Interest Group should rely on the EAACI Executive Office for all administrative matters.

k. A small budget (currently 2,000 Euro/year) will be granted to an Interest Group for administrative expenses including mailing costs, telephone conferences, etc. Budgets and itemised accounts should be submitted to, and approved by, the EAACI Treasurer.

ARTICLE 7 : TASK FORCES

 

For matters where EAACI needs a policy document, a Task Force should be created to be given the task to develop an EAACI Position Statement to be published as a Position Paper. In the past these have automatically been published in Allergy, but this policy is currently under review (June 2003).

 

The EAACI Executive Committee nominates the members of the Task Force, taking into account the views of all interested parties. Non-EAACI Members can be members of Task Forces, typically when they bring specific expertise not available from inside EAACI.

The Task Force should be given a specific task to be completed within a given time, and should report back to the Executive Committee, which has the power to approve the Position Statement. Where appropriate the Executive Committee may grant a small budget to enable the Task Force to meet, hold telephone conferences, etc., and to cover office expenses. Budgets and itemised accounts should be submitted to and approved by the EAACI Treasurer.

 

Task forces should thus go through a four-step approval process.
1. The idea should be proposed to the ExCom

2. The composition of the task force should be approved by the ExCom

3. The budget should be approved by the ExCom

4. The output from the task force should be approved prior to acceptance for publication in Allergy.

 

The first three steps may be taken simultaneously if a properly formulated proposal is put to the Executive Committee but where there is less hurry, the Executive Committee is happy to receive incomplete proposals and approve these in a sequential fashion.

 

 

ARTICLE 8 : COUNCIL OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES

 

A Council of the National Member Societies of the Academy meets at every Academy Congress in order to maintain a liaison between societies and the Executive Committee.

 

The Council of Societies is attended by the President and the Secretary General of the EAACI, as well as delegates (usually the President and Secretary) of each Member Society. Delegates of Affiliate Societies are also invited to participate in the Council. The Council of Societies has an advisory role, while decisions are left either to the General Assembly or to the Executive Committee as established by the constitutional dictates.

 

ARTICLE 9 : EDITORIAL ACTIVITY

 

a. “Allergy: The European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology” is the official journal of the Academy, published by Munksgaard, Copenhagen.

b. Subscription to the journal is included in the annual membership fee.

c. The relationship between EAACI and the publishing house of the journal is regulated by an agreement signed by the EAACI President and/or Secretary General on behalf of, and after approval by the EAACI Executive Committee.

d. [current version – due to be revised] The EAACI Executive Committee nominates the editor-in-chief and the associate editors (the latter being proposed by the Sections with the intention of covering their respective fields of expertise). The publisher must accept the nomination of the Editor-in-Chief as described in the EAACI-Munksgaard agreement. The editors hold office for three years and are eligible for re-election to the same post.

e. The editor of the journal reports every year to the General Assembly on all journal activities.

f. EAACI also publishes a Newsletter aimed at informing members about all the activities of EAACI and providing relevant scientific and professional information. The Newsletter is circulated to all Members and Affiliates of the Academy.

g. The Newsletter is edited by one or more editors nominated by the EAACI Executive Committee. They hold office for two years and are eligible for re-election to the same post. The Editorial Board of the Newsletter is chaired by the EAACI Newsletter Editor and is formed by members representing the various EAACI National Member Societies, nominated by the Newsletter Editor and approved by the Executive Committee.

h. In order to secure the smooth operation of the website, a Web Committee has been created in which each Section, Interest Group and other EAACI Groups and Committees are represented (approximately 30 members).

i. The Web Committee will work closely with the Web Management Team (WMT), which is appointed by the ExCom for a 5 year term. The WMT consists of 3-5 EAACI officials involved in communication issues and is headed by the webmaster, whose responsibility will be the smooth operation of all aspects of the site. The main function of the WMT will be to organise the timely and effective presentation of information on the site, check its communication content and effectively apply EAACI communication policies.

j. The Webmaster will be appointed by the Executive Committee and will be responsible for the day-to-day administration of the site.

k. The Web Committee will meet annually, during the EAACI Congress, in order to address issues and make recommendations on the further improvement of the site.

 

ARTICLE 10 : JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP

 

The EAACI Executive Committee sets the annual membership fees and makes arrangements for reduced subscription rates for different categories of membership.

 

a. Junior Membership shall be available to all those who are aged 35 years or less at the time of renewal of their subscription. Members wishing to obtain this concession shall provide proof of entitlement to the Executive Office upon request.

b. The benefits of Junior Membership shall be determined by the Executive Committee and publicised at Congresses, Joint Symposia, and other EAACI events, as well as on forms for enrolment and membership renewal.

c. The Junior Members Assembly (JMA) consists of all Junior Members who are in good standing. The JMA elects a Junior Members Committee (JMC), which will assist in the co-ordination of activities for Junior Members and will provide advice to the Executive Committee. For financial and administrative purposes, the JMA shall be treated as a Section and the JMC as a Section Board (see Article 5 e/f). Elections to membership of the JMC should occur during the annual congress, in parallel with the standard terms of office of the other EAACI bodies. The chair of the JMC is ex officio a member of the ExCom with voting rights. The term of office is two years, renewable once (as per Section chairs).

 

ARTICLE 11 : EXECUTIVE OFFICE and EXECUTIVE MANAGER

a. EAACI appoints an Executive Manager to take responsibility for clearly defined aspects of the Academy’s functions, including specific tasks that are the responsibility of individual EAACI officers.

b. The Executive Manager is employed on a contract basis which is reviewed and either renewed or advertised every three years.

c. The Executive Manager is provided with an Executive Office, under a separate contract.

d. The Executive Manager is responsible to the Secretary-General for:

i) notifying individual members of the date, place and agenda of the General Assembly at least one month before the meeting

ii) notifying the members of the Executive Committee of the date and place of executive committee meetings at least one month in advance

iii) assisting the Secretary-General in preparing a yearly report for the General Assembly on all activities of the Academy;

iv) keeping a comprehensive filing system of all EAACI activity, including contracts, records of meetings of the General Assembly, Executive Committee, BoO, Sections boards, Interest Groups, JMA section and all planning committees.

v) supplying information to the Newsletter editor and webmaster, or indicating where such information can be found

 

The Executive Manager is responsible to the Treasurer for:


i) keeping a register of all members and affiliates

ii) handling all membership fees and sending out receipts and membership cards

iii) paying all expenses that has clearly been approved by the Executive Committee or BoO

iv) referring all other requests for payment to the Treasurer who will advise whether to pay, or whether approval is needed from the BoO or ExCom.

v) arranging for the yearly balance to be certified by professional auditors

vi) providing such information as the Treasurer may require to make the annual report to the General Assembly on the financial status of the Academy.

 

The Executive Manager is also responsible for:

i) Provision of information requested by the Historian for preparation of the Historian’s report

ii) Updating the EAACI website with relevant information on a regular basis.

 

ARTICLE 12 : AMENDMENTS

 

The EAACI Executive Committee may make amendments to the By-Laws by simple majority voting provided that at least eleven members of the Executive Committee are present.

University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Hatieganu” & Romanian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology & EAACI/GA²LEN announce:
Summer School of Allergology and Clinical Immunology
5-10 SEPTEMBER 2007 CLUJ-NAPOCA
Aula of The University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Hatieganu”
Pasteur St. no. 6
Dear colleagues,

University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Hatieganu” and Romanian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology has the pleasure to announce you that in 5-10 september in Cluj Napoca under -EAACI/GA²LEN- guidance, will be held The First Summer School of Allergology and Clinical Immunology.

 

Topics:

 

1. Immunomodulation,

2. Specific Immunotherapy

3. Hereditary Angioedema

4. Food Allergy

5. Drug Allergy

6. Asthma

7. Allergic Rhinitis

8. Urticaria

9. Contact Dermatitis

10. Non- sedating Antihistamines

11. Varia

 

ORGANISING COMMITEE

CHAIR OF THE PROJECT

DIANA DUMITRAŞCU

 

SECRETARY

ADRIANA BUJOR

CORINA PASTOR

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Prof. dr. VICTOR CRISTEA

Prof. dr. DORU IOAN DEJICA

Conf. dr. DIANA DUMITRAŞCU

Sef lucrari dr. IOANA AGACHE

Sef lucrari dr ROXANA BUMBACEA

Conf. Dr. FLORIN MIHALTAN

Sef lucrari Dr. DUMITRU MOLDOVAN

Prof. dr. MONICA POP

Conf. dr. FLORIN DAN POPESCU

Prof. dr. GEORGETA SINIŢCHI

Şef lucrari Dr. CORINA URECHE

For more informations please contact web: http://alergologiecluj.roSecretary: Conf. dr. DIANA DUMITRAŞCU 3rd Medical Clinic- Allergology CROITORILOR St. 19-23 400169 CLUJ-NAPOCA Tel. 0040264-439989; 0040722-99 75 25 Fax: 0040264-43 34 27 or
SECRETARY

Dr. NADIA GHERMAN IONICĂ

Dr. MINODORA VARGA Dr. LUISE HORVATH

Dr. IOANA CRIŞAN

Dr. CORINA PORR

Dr. NICOLETA CIMPEAN

Dr. CRISTINA BARBANTA

Dr. NICOLAE MIRON

Dr. CORINA BOCSAN

ECATERINA PIRICI

512The University of Southampton offers MSc in Allergy to students wishing to develop their knowledge and skills in the allergic disease. Places available are at the following Master level courses.

A) Master Level Courses

SKIN DISEASE & ITS MANAGEMENT – 6 & 7 JUNE 2005
This module aims to develop an understanding of normal structure and function of the skin, how it is altered by disease and how scientific research and clinical progress promotes good management of a wide range of allergic skin conditions.

NASAL DISEASE AND ITS MANAGEMENT – 4 & 5 OCTOBER 2005
This module aims to develop an understanding of normal nasal physiology and anatomy, how it is altered by disease and how practical skills can be employed in the diagnosis and assessment of a range of allergic nasal conditions.

INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY DISEASE – 6 & 7 OCTOBER 2005
This module aims to develop an understanding of normal structure and function of the lung, how it is altered by disease and how a knowledge of immunological and physiological mechanisms improves the diagnosis and management of a range of allergic lung conditions.

All modules can be taken alone and carry 20 masters level credits each. They may also be taken in combination with other modules to obtain a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or a full MSc in Allergy (180 credits).

B) Mechanisms and Management of Allergic Disease

The School of Medicine at The University of Southampton has places available for students on the module Mechanisms and Management of Allergic Disease (I), the basic core module of the above MSc course, commencing April 2005. The module comprises two blocks of two days teaching on 12 and 13 April and 17 and 18 May 2005.

This programme aims to develop your interest in and knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms and management of allergic disease including the immunological basis, diagnostic testing, pharmaceutical preparations, management programmes and research techniques. The course is open to the wide range of people who require a basic understanding of allergic disease and who come into frequent contact with potential allergy sufferers e.g. doctors, nurses, midwives, health visitors, and school nurses. It is also suitable for specialist registrars and scientists who require a basic training in order to carry out research in allergy.

This module is part of a postgraduate programme that is normally suited to 2-5 years part-time study, leading to 180 credits at HE4. The modules offered are:

  • Mechanisms and Management of Allergic Disease (I) – 40 credits
  • Mechanisms and Management of Allergic Disease (II) – 40 credits
  • Dietetic Management of Allergic Disease – 20 credits
  • Skin Disease and its Management – 20 credits
  • Nasal Disease and its Management – 20 credits
  • Introduction to Respiratory Disease – 20 credits
  • Foundations in Research Methods in Health 1 -Using resources and understanding research methods – 20 credits
  • Foundations in Research Methods in Health 2 - Carrying out research in practice – 20 credits
  • Dissertation – 60 credits
  • All modules can be taken alone or in combination with others. The award at the end of the programme of study will be the degree of Master of Science. A candidate for the MSc may also be a candidate for the subsidiary award of a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits).

    For further information and an application form please contact:

    Dr. Jill A Warner
    Tel: 44 (0)2380 796941
    Email jaw4@soton.ac.uk

    Mrs. Brenda Colwell
    Tel: 44 (0)2380 796379
    Email b.colwell@soton.ac.uk

    Web address
    http://www.soton.ac.uk/
    PostgraduateTaught/MedicineHealthandLifeSciences/Allergy

    http://www.som.soton.ac.uk/
    prospectus/postgrad/msc_allergy/default.asp

    EAACI offers a number of Educational Grants each year to help members in financial difficulty to cover the cost of their yearly membership. The educational grant includes a subscription to the journals ''Allergy'' and "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology''. All Individual and Affiliate Members in EAACI who can motivate their application are welcome to apply for this grant.


    2006 EAACI Educational Grants: The Winners!

    Recipient

    Country

    Wong, Edmund

    Philippines

    Gulbahar, Okan

    Turkey

    Sporcic, Zorica

    Serbia & Montenegro

    Glück, Joanna

    Poland

    Kouhkan, Azam

    Iran

    Noleva, Katya

    Bulgaria

    Vlaski, Emilija

    FYROM

    Raukas-Kivioja, Aet

    Estonia

    Pumputiene, Ingrida

    Lithuania

    Jakovska-Maretti, Tatjana

    FYROM

    Minov, Jordan

    FYROM

    Schober, Wolfgang

    Germany

    Novakova, Sylvia

    Bulgaria

    Hansen, Anker

    Denmark

    Stavric, Katarina

    FYROM

    Bakalova, Rossitza

    Bulgaria

    Gerstmayr, Marianne

    Austria

    Keskin Göksel, Ozlem

    Turkey

    Nanou, Anna

    Greece

    Voor, Tiia

    Estonia

    Zvoristeanu, Anca

    Romania

    Holovyn, Roksolyana

    Ukraine

    Huss-Marp, Johannes

    Germany

    Kirovski, Ilija

    FYROM

    Kamchaisatian, Wasu

    Thailand

    Uguz, Aysen

    Turkey

    Arias Cruz, Alfredo

    Mexico

    Sonomjamts, Munhbayarlah

    Mongolia

    Sun, Baoqin

    China

    We are looking for 2 Ph.D. students for our young research team at the Division of Environmental Dermatology and Allergy GSF/TUM, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Munich-Neuherberg & ZAUM-Center for Allergy and Environment Technische Universität, Munich.

     

    Topic:

    Impact of biogenic and anthropogenic factors on the allergic immune response

     

    One position is open as of now

    One position will open in October 2004

    Duration: 3 years

     

    We are a young and international group of 3 postdoctoral scientists, 3 doctoral students and 2 technicians working toward a common goal in identifying and characterizing endogenous and environmental factors that modulate the allergic immune response. The goal of our studies is to develope novel strategies for primary prevention and identify novel targets for a better therapy of allergic diseases. The studies will be conducted in vitro as well as in vivo using established murine animal models of allergic diseases.

     

    The candidate should be a team player and have a strong background in immunology and/or cell biology. Experience with flow cytometry, protein chemistry and routine molecular biology methods is desirable. Moreover, the candidate should be fascinated by cells and their behaviour in culture as well as interested in in-vivo studies conducted in murine animal models.

     

    We offer integration in running research activities, access to all reqired state of the art biological techniques available at the GSF reseach campus, and PhD research projects with relevance for primary prevention and clinical applications.

     

    Succesful candidates will be paid according to german BAT (BAT IIa/2).

     

    For more information please contact:

    Priv.-Doz. Dr. med. Thilo Jakob, MD, BSc Immunol (UK)
    Division of Environmental Dermatology and Allergy GSF/TUM
    GSF National Research Institute for Environment and Health & ZAUM Center for Allergy and Environment

    TUM Department of Dermatology and Allergy Biederstein
    Technical University Munich
    Biedersteinerstr. 29 80802 Munich

    Germany

     

    E-mail: thilo.jakob@gsf.de

    Phone: +49-89-4140-3505 (clinic)
    +49-89-3187-2556 (lab)
    Fax: +49-89-4140-3502 (clinic)

    +49-89-3187-2540 (lab)

    EAACI WEBMASTER
    Nikos Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
    COMMUNICATIONS/BRUSSELS OFFICE
    Anne Wilmes  wilmes.anne@skynet.be
    NEWSLETTER EDITOR
    Claus Bachert  claus.bachert@rug.ac.be
    EAACI WEBMASTER ASSISTANT
    Irene Andriopoulou irinia@allergy.gr

    SECTION WEBMASTERS
    Asthma
    I Agache ibrumaru@unitbv.ro
    ENT
    C Nunes cn@imunoalergologia.com
    Dermatology
    C Bindslev-Jenssen 
    Carsten.Bindslev-Jensen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
    Pediatrics
    A Muraro muraro@pediatria.unipd.it
    Immunology
    T Jakob thilo.jakob@gsf.de

    INTEREST GROUP WEBMASTERS
    Aerobiology & Pollution
    M Orta morta@imqnavarra.com
    Allergy, Asthma & Sports
    J Galatas doby@hol.gr
    Immunotherapy
    D Caillot dcaillot@wanadoo.fr
    E Valovirta  erkka.valovirta@allergiakeskus.net
    Infections & Allergy
    N Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
    Drug Allergy
    J Fernandez fernandez_jav@gva.es
    Functional Genomics & proteomics
    R. Pawliczak  rafal.pawliczak@csk.am.lodz.pl
    Food Allergy
    G Reese  reege@pei.de
    Occupational Allergy
    J Walusiak jolantaw@imp.lodz.pl
    Diagnostic Tests
    J Kleine-Tebbe kleine-tebbe@allergie-experten.de
    Ocular Allergy
    St Bonini sbonini@mclink.it
    Insects Venom Hypesensitivity
    J Fernandez fernandez_jav@gva.es
    COMMITTEE WEBMASTERS 
    JMA

    I Agache ibrumaru@unitbv.ro
    Ethics
    K Nekam nekamkr.allergy@mail.datanet.hu
    Specialty
    J Gayraud j.gayraud@wanadoo.fr
    CME
    A Negri a.negri@cme-icap.it
    Ex.Com.
    N Papadopoulos ngp@allergy.gr
    EAACI Ex. Office
    D. Öwerström Deirdre.Owerstrom@eaaci.org
    Technical Advisor (Steficon)
    M Sarantinos msarantinos@steficon.com
    Technical Advisor (Congrex)
    B Pehrson bjorn@shocklogic.com
    EAACI WebMaster Assistant
    I Andriopoulou irinia@allergy.gr

    Read the minutes from the Adverse Reactions to Food IG Business Meeting in Paris Congress, June 2003.

    resumenseaic@viajeseci.es
    A Written Declaration on Allergies has been tabled on October 21. In order to be adopted, the majority of the EU Parliament should vote for this by signing. The Written Declaration calls for the implementation of national programmes, better medical training and more scientific research to achieve a better management of the disease, in order to limit its evolution and cost to society.
    {loadposition user9}
    The European Academy for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) has grown to become a very important medical association in Europe. We are proud that our community of medical professionals includes about 7’000 clinicians, academics and researchers.

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    Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

    1. The allergist faced with HIV and AIDS
    2. Specific IgEs and molecular allergens
    3. Urinary leukotriene E4 in asthmatic children exposed to passive smoking
    4. Anaphylaxis to Argan oil
    5. Two new monoclonal antibodies in asthma treatment : Lebrikizumab (anti-IL13) and Reslizumab ® (anti-eosinophil)


    1.  The allergist faced with HIV/AIDS

    Theme:
    Immunodeficiency
    Key words: HIV, AIDS, allergic rhinitis, adverse drug reaction, skin manifestations, asthma, chronic bronchitis

    The use of highly active antiretroviral treatments (tritherapy: i.e nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor: NRTI + non-NRTI + Protease inhibitor) has completely modified HIV infection prognosis. Whereas the life expectancy of AIDS syndrome used to be less than 10 years, HIV-infected patients live over 25. This means that affection has practically become a chronic illness, with more complications or co-morbidities like allergic manifestations. This is the theme of a recent review based on 62 references (Medline) and published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (S.C Stokes and M.S Tankersley 2011 107 July 1-9).

    Already before the era of tritherapy, some symptoms were noted in the course of AIDS, suggestive of allergy such as higher serum IgE levels (in inverse correlation to CD4+ cell count) or rhinitis, rhino-sinusitis, symptoms becoming rarer as HIV developed into AIDS. Adverse reactions to drugs such as Bactrim ® (Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole) and Abacavir (a NRT) were also observed.
    With antiretroviral therapy, the situation has completely changed.

    True, the most serious complications needing to be monitored during the first months of treatment, remain the opportunistic diseases, lipodystrophy, renal, neurologic or psychic (nightmares) and cardiovascular complications, but allergic skin manifestations are appearing, as well as respiratory syndromes akin to bronchial hyper-reactivity and asthma, accompanied among smokers, by risks of chronic bronchitis, all symptoms possibly linked to immune reconstitution, which the allergists and pneumologists must take into consideration. The use of vaccines against influenza, measles or chicken pox can now be even envisaged in asymptomatic HIV infected children under treatment.                          

    Finally, let us not forget the ongoing research for new better tolerated antiretroviral drugs such as rilpivirine (JM Molina et al  Lancet July 2011 378 9787 238- 246) which is proving as efficient as efavirenz, non-NRTI, one of the ‘pillars’ of tritherapy.


    2.  Specific IgEs and molecular allergens

    Theme: molecular allergy / specific IgEs
    Key words: CRD (Component-resolved diagnostics), Micro-array ISAC, Advia Centaur

    Hitherto specific IgE detection techniques were based on total allergenic extracts, i.e. on the allergen source. Recombinant DNA technology makes now possible to reproduce purified allergens in large quantities and at a reasonable cost, and to identify the individual molecules to which patients are sensitised. These molecular diagnosis methods (component-resolved diagnostics, CRD) are clearly explained in three articles of the June 2011 15-20 CIAB, respectively by H .Chabane, V.Doyen,  and J.Vitte, as well as in the Annals of Allergy,Asthma & Immunology 107 July 201135-41 (M.T Lizaso et al). This could lead to more accurate diagnoses, better immunotherapy indications, and also offers an explanation of cross-reactions between airborne and food allergens (e.g. birch / apple)and to definitely rule out non-IgE related Allergy.

    The most current technique, and currently the only one available in France (although not yet covered by Social Security) is the micro-array technique, which simultaneously tests a range of allergens on a glass surface and in the form of micro spots. This is known as a biochip which, thanks to the ISAC concept (Phadia ® : Immuno-Solid-phase Allergen Chip), maps a large number of natural and recombinant molecular allergens on a 1cm2 chip. Other techniques (Avia-Centaur) detecting individual allergens, are being developed and improved, and compared with usual IgE dosages.
    Thus, out of the 103 allergens identified on the ISAC biochip, 36 were not available in individual detection; and in comparison with the traditional ImmunoCAP, the ISAC technique may be less reliable for dust mite allergy. By using the Advia-Centaur technique for pollen allergy, the diagnosis was modified in 30% of the cases, through either the detection of new sensitisations (to Olea for instance), or the ruling out of those irrelevant to clinical data and skin tests. Moreover, some allergenic sources were absent: nuts, vegetables, some milks, plantain for ISAC, cypress for Advia-Centaur.
    Finally, according to R.C.Aalberse & R.Crameri (Allergy 66 2011 1131-1132t ahead of print 02/08 2011), the range of IgE epitopes is so vast that it would be illusory to pick just one of them as a realistic target for diagnosing or treating an allergy.
    All this means that these new techniques, albeit representing a breakthrough in the biological diagnosis of allergy, must be reserved for multiple or IgE-related allergies, or when molecular profiles are not available for unit identification, or even for non-elucidated anaphylactic shocks. In any case, the results must be interpreted in the light of clinical, biochemical, immunological data, and must take into account the relevance of the diagnosis. This is another case for calling to collaboration between biologists and clinicians.


    3.  Urinary leukotriene E4 in asthmatic children exposed to passive smoking (PS)

    Theme: children’s asthma
    Key words: leukotriene LTE4, uLTE4 (urinary leukotriene), asthma exacerbation

    A group of US paediatricians from Denver (N.Rabinovitch et al JACI 2011 128 2 August 323-327) thinking that asthmatic children exposed to PS were running the risk of severe exacerbations, have been looking for useful and convenient biomarkers for testing sensitivity to this environmental factor. LTE4 urinary dosage was used for this purpose. 44 children suffering from moderate to severe asthma and being treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were monitored for 5 months with repeated urinary LTE4 measurement, PS was revealed by preliminary questionnaires and repeated measurement of urinary cotinine, and asthma exacerbations were counted by emergency hospital consultations (EC) or intensive care hospitalisations (IC).

    The results were as follows :
    -    9 out of the 20 PS-exposed children (45%) did suffer exacerbation of their asthma requiring EC or IC, compared to 3 of the 24 not exposed to PS (12.5%), i.e. a relative risk of 3.6 (95% IC 1.1-11.5 P=.02).
    -    uLTE4 was a significant predictive factor of exacerbation risk in PS-exposed children (area under the curve 0.85 P=.003). Other factors such as the frequency of nocturnal symptoms, the pre- and post-bronchodilation pulmonary function, or  expired NO, were unrelated to exacerbations.
    -    As to uLTE4 levels of 106 pg/mg and above, they revealed 67% sensitivity (6/9) but 100% specificity (11/11).
    In conclusion, asthmatic children exposed to PS run a higher risk of exacerbations and the urinary LTE4 levels constitute, despite the use of ICS, the most reliable predictive factor.


    4.  Anaphylaxis to argan oil

    Theme: particular allergen
    Key words: argan oil, argan bush, oleosins

    Argan oil is extracted from nuts contained in the fruits of the argan tree (Argania spinosa of the Sapotaceas group), which grows in arid or semi-arid zones of south-western Morocco ; oil is extracted by heating, roasting and pressing the nuts according to ancestral processes and is traditionally used locally for its cosmetic but also medicinal and nutritional properties.         

    The observation reported has already been published and summarised in Allergy Net (2010 65, 662-63Astier et al), but it was developed more recently by Y.El Alaoui (Journees Pneumo-allergologiques d’Agadir, organised in collaboration with Cefcap in June 2010). The case is that of a 34 year old man, without allergy history, who suffered from rhinitis and conjunctivitis when smelling argan oil ; the ingestion of the oil also induced hypersalivation and epigastralgia.

    The prick tests to argan paste (residue after oil extraction) were positive and after a few minutes provoked generalised erythema and urticaria as well as pharyngo-laryngeal discomfort. Proteins extracted from the oil were analysed by SDS-PAGE and IgEs by immunoblotting and immuno-competition in contact with the patient’s serum. Oil electrophoresis revealed a protein profile close to that of the argan fruit stones, and serum IgEs recognised a 10KDa band which disappeared after inhibition with extract of the nuts. These proteins probably belong to the oleosin family, known to be powerful allergens like those described for peanut or sesame.
    This first case should attract our attention, as argan oil is used more and more frequently, locally where the price is rising but also in the West and the Far East, without forgetting the many tourists who visit Morocco. Its unsaturated fatty acid profile has made it attractive from a nutritional point of view.

    The argan tree is 8-10m high and lives for an average of 250 years. It is generally estimated that 100 kg of fruit and 8-10 hours of work are necessary to obtain 1 to 1.2 litres of oil. Three types of producer can be distinguished : individuals (i.e. village women using traditional methods), cooperatives (of which there are over 40, using more or less mechanised extraction), and private industries (set up in Casablanca and which only buy nuts or kernels).

    Attention should also be drawn to the need to further refine the oil, a step likely to inhibit its allergenicity.


    5.  Two new monoclonal antibodies in asthma treatment : anti-IL13 Lebrikizumab (L) and anti-eosinophil Reslizumab (R)

    Theme: anti asthma treatment
    Key words: anti IL13 Lebrikizumab, anti eosinophil Reslizumab, asthma, uncontrolled asthma, cytokine IL13, periostin, FEV1

    Two simultaneous articles, one from the USA (J.Corren et al NEJM 2011 August 3), the other from Quebec and  USA  (M.Castro AJRCCM 2011 August 18), have been focusing on asthma which are poorly controlled by Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS).

    Type-Th2 IL13 cytokine plays a part in the allergic asthma mechanism, but, while ICS theoretically inhibit its production, large quantities of it are found in sputum from uncontrolled asthma, which could account for resistance to corticoids. Besides, IL13 induces the secretion by bronchial epithelial cells of a protein of the extra-cellular matrix: periostin (P), which causes the production of mucus and acts upon fibroblasts, thus capable of intervening in bronchial remodeling. L is an anti-IL13 IgG4 humanised monoclonal antibody, and the authors of the article made use of serum P as a marker of its activity, easier to dose than IL13.
    219 randomised patients, presenting high levels of IgE (?100 UI/ml) and eosinophils (?0.14?109) which revealed a Th2 status, were treated by a monthly injection of 250mg of L (or Placebo) for 6 months.
    -    After 3 months, FEV1 was 5 points higher than that of the placebo group (P=.02) and 8.2 points higher for the high P-rate group. But, the number of exacerbations at the 6th month was no different from the placebo group.
    -    From a biological point of view, the decrease in IgE level and Th2 chemokines (CCL13 and CCL17) proves the efficiency of L. Side effects were musculoskeletal, generally benign.

    The anti-IL5 monoclonal antibody R was applied to eosinophilic asthma :
    53 patients and as many placebo patients received infusions of 3mg/kg over 15 weeks. In addition to significant reductions in the number of exacerbations (P=0.083), a modest FEV1 increase was observed, particularly among subjects also suffering from nasal polyposis. Adverse effects were mostly naso-pharyngo-laryngeal and the treatment was well tolerated on the whole.

    Thus, a breakdown of asthmatic disease into several phenotypes is on its way, with therapy aiming at different targets : IgEs with Omalizumab (Xolair®), IL13 with L, eosinophils with R. But these treatments are heavy, costly and not without long-term risks. They should be reserved for particularly difficult cases.

    -----

    Comments and questions welcome :

    Pr. Claude Molina    and/or    Dr Jacques Gayraud
    *claude.nelly.molina@orange.fr **j.gayraud@orange.fr

    The EAACI JMA Working Group is delighted to launch the first JMA Mentorship Program (MP).  The aims of the JMA MP is to promote the objectives of our field, targeting commitment to ongoing education for young scientists and enhancing JMA capacities as professionals.  The MP is expected to improve knowledge transfer of experienced professionals to juniors, increase JMAs' appreciation of and orientation in the field, promote opportunities for JMAs to work closely with a faculty mentor also for developing a paper for presentation at an academic conference and/or for publication.
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    EAACI offers a number of Educational Grants each year to help members in financial difficulty to cover the cost of their yearly membership. The educational grant includes a subscription to the journals ''Allergy'' and "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology''. All Individual and Affiliate Members in EAACI who can motivate their application are welcome to apply for this grant.
    2011 Educational Grant - apply now!
    Download the application form and send it
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    EAACI Headquarters
    Matthias Paulovics
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    This month, Prof. J. Christian Virchow has granted an interview to Website Management Team during the 29th EAACI Congress in London.  He shares his experience as an SPC Coordinator in Congresses.  Click here to read the entire interview.

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    Claude MOLINA & Franz MARRACHE

    1.    Postmenopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and asthma
    2.    Egg allergy and flu vaccine
    3.    Bronchial hyperreactivity and menstrual cycle
    4.    Cow’s milk allergy in pediatrics and constipation
    5.    Skin prick testing and beta-blockers (BB)?


    Postmenopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and asthma

    While MHT has been proven to be the cause of delayed onset of cancers, particularly breast cancers, the risk of asthma onset is more rarely reported. The very important epidemiologic study carried out by the French INSERM team within a teaching population (Mutuelle Generale de l’Education Nationale) of women patients monitored prospectively between 1990 and 2002, throws new light on this issue (I.Romieu et al : Thorax on line 8th February 2010).

    The characteristics of this cohort of women, free of asthma at menopause and following a hormone replacement therapy of oestrogen alone or combined oestrogen-progestagen, were surveyed twice a year through a questionnaire : age, treatment start and end dates, type of menopause (surgical by hysterectomy or medical), smoking habits, atopy history, all this data was submitted to a Cox model-based statistical analysis.

    Among 57 664 women, representing 495 448 years of follow-up, 569 incident cases of asthma were identified (as defined per the American Thoracic Society’s criteria). The risk is significantly higher in so-called ‘recent’ users (who stopped the treatment less than a year and a half before), and in users of oestrogen alone, but also in never-smokers and patients reporting allergic disease prior to asthma onset.
    A marginal increase in risk among patients using oestrogen/progestagen was also observed.

    Finally, and after having tried to explain both the pro and anti-inflammatory acting mechanisms of female hormones, as well as tobacco’s anti-oestrogen effect, the authors conclude this excellent study by repeating that oestrogen treatment is associated with an increased risk of asthma onset.

    Key-words: Hormone Replacement Therapy ; Asthma; Oestrogens; Progestagen


    Egg allergy and flu vaccine:

    What attitude should be adopted when, during an influenza epidemic such as the recent H1N1 one, a vaccine is offered to a truly egg-sensitive subject, knowing the anaphylactic risks that this subject bearing the corresponding IgEs could run, if injected with a vaccine including small quantities of egg proteins? (J.M.Kelso JACI 2010 125 Avril 800-802).

    Specialised publications reveal that in 1976, in the USA, out of 48 million vaccinated people there were 11 cases of anaphylaxis but none of  them were egg allergic, and that between 1900 and 2005, out of 747 million doses of vaccine, 4 deaths could be related to anaphylaxis (without any details on the exact nature of these accidents). By comparison, during the same period, there were 540 000 deaths due to the viral infection, of which a great number could have been avoided. Finally, only 1 single death could be linked to egg allergy in 1969 after  receiving anti-flu vaccine, again with few details on the reported case.

    Concerning the administration technique and the few minimal incidents reported among subjects vaccinated despite their egg allergy, the study by James et al 1998 J.Pediatr.624-628) reveals that in 83 cases, concerning adults and children from age 1 to age 46, the preliminary injection of 10% of the dose caused for 3 subjects a reaction of irritated airway which decreased in 30 minutes, the injection of the remaining 90% being perfectly tolerated. Besides, the quantity of ovalbumin the subjects were able to tolerate without problems was close to the threshold of 1.2µg/ml or less, which renders useless both prick-tests prior to vaccination and the 2-shot vaccine method.

    It is reassuring to observe with an independent study on 2009-2010 H1N1 vaccine batches that the ovalbumin rates discovered in the world’s major lab preparations were distinctly below those thresholds.
    Indeed when a patient presents a preliminary reaction to an anti-flu vaccine, it is possible to suspect the responsibility of another vaccine constituent (such as the thimerosal used as a preservative and which is in fact prohibited for young children and pregnant women). Moreover, nasal administration, despite its low content of egg protein, has not proven efficient and is not recommended for asthmatics, who are often simultaneously egg allergic.

    In conclusion, by taking a number of elementary precautions (vaccination by competent staff, appropriate equipment, 30 minute monitoring after the injection), an anti-flu vaccine with less ovalbumin than that the 1µg/0,5ml threshold, can be administrated without risk to an egg allergic person, without hindering the vaccine’s positive effect on the general morbidity and mortality rates due to influenza viruses.

    Key-words: egg allergy; influenza virus vaccine; H1N1 virus


    Bronchial hyperreactivity and menstrual cycle:

    Hormonal influence on asthma onset and evolution in women is clinically well known, whether it concerns puberty, pregnancy or the menstrual cycle, but its evolution is extremely inconsistent, either positive or negative according to publications.

    That is why the Swiss authors (J.Dratva et al JACI 2010 125 823-829), looking for objective parameters, have tried to specify the role of hormones on the bronchial physiology of healthy subjects, by addressing a cohort of young women from their well-known cohort (SAPALDIA : Study on Air Pollution And Lung Disease In Adults) examining modifications of bronchial
    hyperreactivity (BHR) in relation to the menstrual cycle and to use of oral contraceptives.

    Out of the 4 180 women in the cohort, and after exclusions for various reasons, 1 482 filled in the appropriate questionnaire, but only 571, aged 28 to 58, were considered as fitting the criteria for the study, which includes  respiratory functional tests (CV, FEV1), metacholine challenge and information on the menstrual cycle. The authors defined a risk window of 3 days before and 1 day after the first day of menstruation. All data were statistically analysed (logistical and linear regression analyses).

    The resulting prevalence of BHR was 13% (fall of ?20% in FEV1 up to a maximal cumulative dose of 2mg of metacholine), and 6% had asthma. Besides, 143 patients underwent the metacholine test within the ‘risk window’ and a significant increase in BHR was observed during that period (odds ratio [OR], 2.3; 95% CI, .27-4.29).

    Moreover, taking into account the use of oral contraceptives by 130 patients, the study revealed a weaker OR for asthma-free subjects, but a ?1 OR with patients using contraceptives whose protection against BHR is confirmed.

    In conclusion, women, even asthma-free, show a cyclical variation of BHR in the perimenstrual period which must be taken into consideration to adjust treatment in case of asthmatics. The protective influence of oral contraceptives on that BHR should also be noted.

    Key-words: bronchial hyperreactivity; menstrual cycle; oral contraceptives


    Cow’s milk allergy in pediatrics and constipation

    Constipation is responsible for 3-5% of physician visits by children. It is associated with painful defecation, perianal erythema or eczema, anal fissures, and painful fecal retention thus aggravating constipation. M. A. El-Hodhod  et al have aimed to evaluate the role and place of cow’s milk allergy (CMA) and the appropriate timing of tolerance in such patients : Cow’s milk allergy related pediatric constipation: Appropriate time of milk tolerance. Pediatr Allergy  Immumol  2010: 21: e407–e412.

    60 new-borns and young children suffering from chronic functional constipation were enrolled in the study : 27 of whom did not respond to 2-month laxative therapy (G1). 30 other healthy matching subjects were studied as a control group (G2). IgE to cow milk (CM) proteins was measured ; CM and dairy products were withdrawn for 1 month then followed by progressive CM re-challenge over 2 weeks. On the basis of their responses, subjects were classified into allergic responders (R+) and non allergic responders (R-), respectively 21 and 6 patients.

    Within this group of new-borns and young children with chronic constipation, CMA was found in 77.7% cases, i.e. more than 2 out of 3, with serum specific IgEs significantly higher than in non allergic healthy or chronically constipated subjects. Besides, 22.2% of these children will become tolerant to CM after 6 months of removal and 88.8% after 12 months.

    Thus, although the study was limited, CMA appears for these authors to be a significant etiologic factor for constipation in infants and young children. Serum levels of IgE to CM proteins are helpful although not definitive for diagnosis. Moreover, CM tolerance is better achieved after 12 months’ elimination.

    Key words: Cow milk allergy, constipation,


    Skin prick testing and beta-blockers (BB)?

    The use of BBs is a problem for allergic subjects because they may increase the occurrence and the severity of a possible anaphylactic reaction and complicate treatment. They are considered to be responsible for an increase in synthesizing and liberating the mediators of anaphylaxis, as well as a rise in the targeted organs’ response. Hence, the restrictions, even the contraindications pronounced as to their prescription with atopic subjects, notably during a specific immunotherapy. (cf. on the same topic our March 2005 and April 2008 Bibliographic Updates)

    Aware of those risks, Irene N Fung et Harold L Kim (Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers: a retrospective analysis, Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6) nevertheless wondered if such a veto was justified for allergy skin prick testing, no anaphylactic accident having been reported hitherto.

    From patients consulting between 2004-2008 they selected all those who were using BBs and had undergone allergy skin tests (STs), prick tests and/or intradermal reactions. Out of the 191 subjects identified, 72 had positive results on skin tests for various allergens: environmental aeroallergens, hymenoptera venoms, food allergens, drug allergens (penicillin), latex, associated with clinical reactions concerning airways (rhinitis and/or cough, asthma) or skin (angio-oedema, rash, urticaria), and anaphylactic reactions which were either drug or food induced.

    As for the diseases justifying the use of BBs, they were mainly cardiovascular (arterial hypertension, coronary arteritis, myocardial infarction history, arrhythmia), or ocular (glaucoma).

    The BBs were prescribed by oral or ocular intake.

    In fact, no incident or accident was observed during the skin tests.

    In the light of these results, the authors consider that skin tests on atopic patients taking BB medications are harmless. They observe, in passing, that when lethal accidents occurred during immunotherapy between 1964 and 2001 as reported by the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology (AAAI), BBs were not involved.

    Key words:
    Beta Blockers, anaphylaxis, skin tests,



    Source: CEFCAP
    You may send comments on these brief news to:  cme.inallergy.online@wanadoo.fr

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    Date: 25 - 26 March 2010

    Place: Berlin, Germany

    Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11 February 2010

     

    All participants are welcome to submit an abstract for a poster or oral presentation!

    More details are available on the conference website:

    www.allergie-centrum-charite.de/bradykinin 2010

     


    Call for Applications


    EAACI is seeking a qualified individual for the position of Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) Coordinator for the next 2 years term.

    The EAACI SPC is responsible for assembling the Scientific Program for the EAACI Annual Congresses, currently the largest Allergy Congress worldwide. The SPC involves several EAACI Officers and representatives of all sections and interest groups and is chaired by the SPC Coordinator.

    The SPC Coordinator is responsible for organisation and chairing of 3-4 SPC meetings, monthly teleconferences and ~1200 e-mails per year, compiling the first and second Congress announcements, finalizing the congress book, organising abstract submission, chairing the abstract selection procedure, and keeping scientific, topical and geographical and balance.


    The selected individual should have:
    a) A high scientific profile, judged by publications, citations and major meeting presentations

    b) Time availability for the schedule detailed above

    c) Commitment to EAACI and past involvements in relevant activities

    d) High communication skills


    Applications including a CV, disclosure of conflict of interests and motivation letter should be sent to the EAACI Headquarters, to the attention of EAACI Executive Director Silvia Schaller (hq@eaaci.net)

    Closing date: 8 February 2010, 17:00

    More information on the position can be obtained from the EAACI Vice President for Congresses, Prof C. Akdis (akdisac@siaf.uzh.ch) and the current SPC Coordinator Prof C. Virchow (j.c.virchow@med.uni-rostock.de).

    741The 7th Symposium on Experimental Rhinology and Immunology of the Nose (SERIN) is being organised by ENT section of EAACI from 13 to 15 November 2008 in Dubrovnik, Croatia.The main power of SERIN is the active interaction between experts, researchers and those who intend to upgrade the scientific level of their research in the focused field of ENT and respiratory medicine.

    Main topics
    The main topics of the meeting will include basic and clinical research on allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, rhino-sinusitis, nasal polyps, upper-lower airways interaction (infection, allergy, hyperreactivity), neurogenic inflammation, brain-nose axis, olfaction, neural regulation, novel approach to treatment of rhinosinusal disease, genomics and proteomics.

    After a succesful 6th SERIN symposium in Barcelona in February 2006, the location of the meeting has moved towards eastern Mediterranean region, the beautiful city on the coast of the Adriatic sea. As on previous SERIN meetings, held in Dueseldorf, Rotterdam, Ghent, London, Ghent and Barcelona, the aim is to gather together the researchers and their contributions from basic and clinical research in rhinology, allergology and respiratory medicine, both experts in the field and the young researchers.

    461

    Abstract Submission

    Abstracts may be submitted online through symposium website: www.hdorl.net/serin2008 , or a filled-abstract form may be sent by e-mail to symposium secretary: cgrbesic@kbsm.hr.

    A structured abstract with up to 250 words, should be written in MS Word text processor or compatible, using Times New Roman font, font size 12, single spacing.


    Abstract structure:

    Title in the uppercase

    Authors: Family names, followed by given names initials

    Affiliations: Institution, city, country

    The text body should contain paragraphs: Background, Methods, Results, Conclusions.

    All the information on the deadlines, registration and accomodation may be found on the symposium website. Confirmation of abstract submission would be sent to the author by e-mail.

    Travel Grants
    The EAACI JMA members may apply for EAACI travel grant which provides free registration, accomodation and refund of travel expenses (economy class for the plane ticket) up to 500 Eu with the original receipt. The application for a travel grant should be sent by e-mail with the submitted abstract to symposium secretary: cgrbesic@kbsm.hr. Check your EAACI membership before applying for travel grants, as only EAACI JMA members are entitled to such application.

    On behalf of the local organising committee and EAACI ENT section board, it is my pleasure to invite you to 7th Symposium on Experimental Rhinology and Immunology of the Nose (SERIN).

    For more information, please visit the official website http://www.hdorl.net/serin2008/.

    Livije Kalogjera
    President of the Local Organising Committee

    Main Tasks
    Administrators of the Sections and Interest Groups are responsible for the regular updating of the content of their own section or interest group. Among their main tasks are, adding and modifying articles, media and relevant files. The Web Committee will meet once a year during the EAACI Congress to discuss strategies for web development.

    Chrysanthi Skevaki
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    K Sofianou katsofkat@hotmail.com
    H D Lauenstein lauenstein@item.fraunhofer.de

    Back to top

    JMAs are actively involved in a series of activities including Section Activities, Summer/Winter Schools, as well as Business Meetings. JMAs operate their own schedule and programme at all EAACI Congresses, which apart from scientific meetings involve several social activities that help Junior Members of the Academy get to know each other better in a more relaxed environment.

    1924

    Date: 06 - 08 July 2009
    Place: Rome, Italy

    GA²LEN, Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, organises a training course on clinical trials in allergic diseases research from 06 to 08 July 2009. The course will be hosted by the Italian National Drug Agency in Rome, Italy.

    The Course will provide basic information on the role of clinical research in compliance with Good Clinical Practice for practicing allergists and young investigators. It will cover the requirements for designing and performing clinical research both in the context of contracts with pharmaceutical or biotech companies and as a site-originated independent research.  A Manual for Clinical Trials will be delivered at the end of the Course.

    Scientific Programme
    The preliminary programme is now available.

    More information and the draft Programme available on the GA²LEN website www.ga2len.net

    Organising Secretariat: c/o JAKA Congressi, c.raffaelli@jaka.it


    GA2LEN Symposium at the EAACI Congress 2009

    XXVIII EAACI Congress

    Monday, 8 June 2009
    13.30 – 15.00

    Severe Asthma: An unmet need?
    Chairpersons: Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium, Gunilla Hedlin, Sweden

    ■ The epidemiology of severe asthma in Europe
    Peter Burney, United Kingdom
    ■ Experiences from a British network of severe asthma in adults
    Chris Brightling, United Kingdom
    ■ Severe problematic asthma, not one entity, but several
    phenotypes throughout childhood
    Kai-Håkon Carlsen, Norway
    ■ Towards a global definition of severe asthma
    Jean Bousquet, France

    Open positions for the JMA representatives for the Dermatology, Immunology and Asthma Section as well as for the JMA Webmaster are now available for the new, 2009-2011, JMA Working Group.

    European EFA event, in Lisbon,Portugal

    Maria Jemalm

    628.KurowskiMedical University of Lodz

    Pomorska 251, building C5

    92213 Lodz

    Poland

    Tel: +48-42-675-6757329

    Fax: +48-42-6782292

    E-mail: marcin.kurowski@csk.umed.lodz.pl

    I completed my medical education at the Medical University of £ódŸ between 1993 and 1999. As a student I became involved in the scientific activity in the Division of Pneumonology and Allergology, Dept. of Medicine. At the same institution I started my PhD studies, which I have successfully completed in 2004. My thesis dealt with the prophylactic treatment of allergic rhinitis with the use of antihistamine and antileukotriene agents.

    Since November 2004 I have been working at the Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Medical University of £ódŸ, and my main field of interest is molecular biology and its use in investigating genetic backgrounds of allergy. Apart from that I work in the outpatient allergy clinic and finish my internal medicine training.

    I’m still single (this is, however, about to change…. J).
    My “extra-medical” ;-) interests include: foreign languages, politics, history and….combat sports.

    1360David A. Groneberg

    Charité School of Medicine
    Free University and Humboldt-University Berlin
    Allergy-Centre-Charité
    Augustenburger Platz 1 OR-1
    Germany
    Tel: +49-30-450559055
    Fax: +49-30-450559951
    E-mail: david.groneberg@charite.de

    David Groneberg studied medicine in Giessen and Cambridge (final year placement) and obtained his medical degree at the Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany. After research positions in the Department of Thoracic Medicine (Prof. K. F. Chung), National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, a clinical research fellowship at the Allergy-Centre Charité, Free and Humboldt-University, Berlin (Prof. U. Wahn), and a junior-professorship for Respiratory Immunology at the University of Lübeck and Research Centre Borstel, Germany, he returned to the Allergy-Centre-Charité, Berlin. He currently heads research groups focusing on molecular pneumology at the Charité and Berlin and the Hannover Medical School.

    For his medical thesis he investigated pulmonary drug transport pathways which can be used for target-specific delivery of asthma drugs. His present research is focused on inflammatory mediators of allergic diseases such as nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide or tachykinins. A second major point of interest is the investigation of pathomechanisms of respiratory symptoms such as mucus hypersecretion and cough.

    He is an active member of the European Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), Germany Society for Pneumology (DGP), German Airway League, German Lung Foundation, German Society for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and the German Society for Nicotine Research, and involved in the implementation of guidelines for respiratory medicine.
    623Dear JMA,

    We have great news for all JMAs:


    * Dermatology
    * Immunology
    * Asthma Section
    * JMA Webmaster

    are now available for the new, 2009-2011, JMA Working Group! This is definetly your chance to get involved in the JMA activities!

    If you are willing to overtake this challenging job, we would very much appreciate your letter of intention and CV sent, before 15 February 2009.

    In the last years, the JMA Working Group has actively participated in EAACI activities and has achieved considerable benefits for the JMAs, including free registration, travel grants, poster prizes, Junior sessions, JMA clinical fellowships etc. The JMA Working Group consists of the Chairperson, 5 Section representatives and the Webmaster, it is elected every 2 years following the periodicity of the Executive Committee.

    The present JMA Working Group was elected in Gotenborg (2007) and following the JMA procedures, the JMA Chair (Luis Miguel Borrego) will become the JMA past-chair. We will also, elect electronically the new Chairperson after Warsaw 2009.

    The responsibilities of JMA representatives
    • To provide information to JMAs regarding activities
    • To liaise with the relevant Section/IG board, the JMA group and all the JMAs in the section, in order to promote participation in EAACI activities.

    The main forum for meeting and discussing among JMAs is the yearly JMA Business Meeting held at the occasion of the EAACI Congress, where the JMA Working group should give a full report of activities. The JMA group also, organises a Poster session and an Educational Forum during the EAACI yearly Congress. The JMA Working group is also responsible for developing contacts with similar groups in other organisations, such as the Fellows in Training in the AAAAI.

    Voting procedures
    • The Working group is elected every 2 years, following the periodicity of the Executive Committee.
    • Available JMA representative posts are open for re-election for any JMA given that the person is graduated MD or BSc and under 35 years at the time of election, is an inhabitant of a European country, is a member of the section to which he/she is applying and is prepared and able to come to the EAACI Annual Congress and other JMA meetings. The same JMA representative post can be held for a maximum of 2 periods (4 years).
    • The JMA Chairperson must have held one of the other positions in the Working group for at least one period before being elected by the JMA Working group. The JMA Chairperson and JMA Past-chairperson post are not open for re-election (one period of two years).
    • Interested candidates should send a CV and a short description of their work intentions (+-500 words) in the group to the EAACI Executive Office before the given deadline. The working group will select up to 3 candidates/post based on keeping a well balanced group (gender, nationality etc.) The list will be presented, together with the candidates CV and summary, on the JMA Website and voting will be made by e-mail. The voting is open to all JMAs of the EAACI. The new JMA Working group starts after the results of the election have been presented at the JMA Business Meeting.

    Are you interested?
    Please send us your e-mail, with a CV and a short description of yourself and your interest for EAACI activities (<500 words), to the EAACI Executive Office at executive.office@eaaci.org. Please indicate your interest in the Webmaster post. The deadline for submission is 15 February 2009.

    We are looking forward to receiving your responses and will contact the nominated JMA by e-mail.

    Best regards,

    Luis Miguel Borrego

    JMA Chairperson

    SERIN 2008

     

    The aims of the Clinical Fellowships are to spread Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Europe and to promote fellowships in allergy and clinical immunology in order to support highly skilled specialists on this field in Europe. The Fellowships target at members in training for allergy and clinical immunology and will be prioritized to clinicians early in their career.

    Target: To spread Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Europe and promote fellowships in allergy and clinical immunology in order to support highly skilled specialists on this field in Europe

    The Clinical Fellowships will be prioritized to clinicians early in their career, and are not intended for well-established specialists.

    Conditions for application:

    1. Member of EAACI, in training or recently specialized in allergy and clinical
    immunology.
    2. Letter of recommendation.
    3. Motivation letter, specifying the centre for application.
    4. Commitment letter assuming that the candidate will not apply to any other national/european grant for the fellowship.
    5. curriculum vitae (1 A4 page maximum)
    6. Confirmation from host & home supervisor that they accept the terms

    Fellowship’s duration: 3 months.

    Winner’s announcement: The formal announcement of the winners will take place after the JMA poster session on the EAACI annual meeting. Nevertheless, all applicants will receive a formal answer by e-mail regarding their application till the end of February.

    Fellowship’s schedule:
    all fellows will have one year after the formal announcement to complete their fellowship, depending on the centres/fellow availability.

    Number of fellowships: Every year there will be 5 fellowships available for application.

    Grants:
    The winners of the clinical fellowships will have a grant of 3000 Euros provided by EAACI in order to pay expenses for accommodation and travels, for which they must present receipts. Salary would be provided by the hospital of origin. The sum of 3000 Euros will cover 450Euros for travel and 850Euros/month for accommodation.

    Final Reports: At the end of the fellowship the candidate has to make a report emphasising the activities made, as well as critics/suggestions. A brief report of the candidate would also be made by the centre.

    Time for application: Application must be sent electronically by January 31 2011 to:

    EAACI Headquarters
    Sladjana Scepan
    Education and Specialty Manager
    Genferstrasse 21
    8002 Zurich
    Switzerland
    Telephone: +41 44 205 55 33
    Fax: +41 44 205 55 39
    E-Mail: sladjana.scepan@eaaci.net



    MRC/UoE CENTRE FOR INFLAMMATION RESEARCH

    POST DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

    £27,466-£32,796

    Based within the Queen’s Medical Research Institute, Little France, you will contribute to the development of a Wellcome Trust funded programme of research with a focus on the role of dendritic cells in the immune mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation and lung function changes in respiratory viral infections, and their role in development and exacerbations of reactive airway disease, such as bronchial asthma. You will also facilitate the development of pre-clinical and clinical models and produce material for publication. You should have a PhD in a biological science and preferably experience in cellular immunology, molecular biology and murine models of disease.

    For informal enquiries contact: jurgen.schwarze@ed.ac.uk.
    The post is available until 31st December 2009
    Please apply via jobs.ac.uk, deadline 26.11.07

    INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES
    Post: Post Doctoral Research Associate

    Department: MRC/UoE Centre for Inflammation Research

    Vacancy Reference Number: (insert)
    ________________________________________

    The University of Edinburgh

    The University of Edinburgh has been instrumental in shaping history for over 400 years. An exciting, vibrant, research led academic community we offer opportunities to work with leading international academics whose visions are shaping tomorrow’s world. Our 21 Schools, spread across 3 Colleges, offer over 350 undergraduate and 160 postgraduate courses to more than 20,000 students each year.

    As a member of staff, you will not only be part of one the world’s leading Universities, working with one of the leading employers in Edinburgh, with over 7000 people employed across a wide range of academic and supporting roles.

    The College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine

    The College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, is headed by Professor J S Savill; who is also the Head of the Medical School. The Medical School in Edinburgh can trace its origins back nearly 500 years (Darwin, Simpson and Conan-Doyle were students here) and is internationally renowned for its research and teaching (all College academic staff were graded 4, 5 or 5* in the 2001 RAE with ~50 percent in Hospital Based Clinical Subjects which was graded 5*). The existing qualifications for undergraduates are amongst the most competitive in the UK.

    The academic disciplines within Medicine are largely concentrated in the two teaching hospitals in Edinburgh, namely the new Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh at Little France (NRIE) and the Western General Hospital (WGH). The NRIE was recently constructed on a green field site under a Private Finance Initiative (completed 2002). It is a state-of-the-art multi-speciality hospital together linked to the Medical School which is housed in two purpose built teaching and research facilities, the Chancellors Building and the Queen’s Medical Research Institute providing the accommodation and facilities required for the majority of the clinical students and associated academic clinical staff previously located at the Old Royal Infirmary.

    The Western General Hospital (WGH) has also undergone major redevelopment of its clinical research and teaching facilities. The Molecular Medicine Centre (£5m) was opened in 1995, a new Clinical Research Facility (£4m; joint development between the Wellcome Trust, University and Lothian Health), a £40m new clinical wing, the Anne Ferguson Building, and a new Medical Education Centre (£1m) were opened in 2001, and a new Cancer Research Building (£7m) in 2002. The University (through its Medical School) and Lothian Health work in close collaboration to ensure the integration of the Health Board's Integrated Health Care Plan for Lothian with the University's teaching and research plans.

    The MRC/UoE Centre for Inflammation Research

    Investigators in the MRC/UoE Centre for Inflammation Research (CIR) aim, by pursuit of current peer-reviewed research programmes enhanced by judicious and focussed collaboration, to characterise and manipulate key control points in inflammation. Effort is targeted at:

    I. Inhibiting the initiation of inflammation by blocking immunologically-specific triggers and by modulating cellular and tissue responses in injurious stimuli;

    II Finding new approaches to promote beneficial regulation of established inflammatory responses so as to limit tissue injury; and

    III Promoting safe resolution of inflammation and restoration of the structure and function of the perturbed tissue The CIR has a particular interest in inflammatory disease of the lungs and kidney, but the principles derived will have ready application to inflammatory responses in the liver, bowel, bone/joint and skin.

    Further details about the Centre may be found at http://www.cir.med.ed.ac.uk

    Job Purpose

    To contribute to the development of a programme of research into the immune mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation and lung function changes in respiratory viral infections, and their role in development and exacerbations of subsequent reactive airway disease, such as bronchial asthma. This research will use both pre-clinical and clinical models. The development of dendritic cell based immune modulation in this context will be of particular interest. To conduct original research, to produce material for publication and to contribute to the development of grant applications.

    Main Responsibilities

    1.( Approx. 50% of time) Conduct and facilitate a programme of individual research within the scope of a Wellcome Trust funded project examining mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation and lung function changes in respiratory viral infections. Techniques in use during the study will include cell culture of primary cells and cell lines and manipulation of viral vectors, in vivo studies in murine models, molecular biology manipulations and optical imaging analysis. The post holder will therefore have responsibility for delivering core elements of the research programme.

    2. (20%) Maintain accurate and up-to-date records to document the research progress. Take a lead role in writing up data for publication. Present data at group meetings, Centre meetings, and conferences to make data available for other workers. Regular reporting of progress to the PI/other members of the research team is expected. Presentation of research findings at national and international level

    3.(10 %) Contribute to the dissemination and publication of own/research team’s research findings.

    4.(10%) To prepare research proposals and applications to external funding bodies based on a line of future research.

    5.(5 %) To continually update knowledge and understanding in the field or specialism, and update skill base within the defined research area

    6.(5%) To provide guidance and supervision for student projects and/or instruction of students in the use of equipment and demonstration of techniques

    Planning and Organising

    The post-holder will plan and manage own programme of research activity on an ongoing basis, to ensure that the research is conducted in accordance with the research timetable which will be discussed with the line manager. Assist more junior members of the research team in planning and scheduling of their workload, in accordance with the demands of the overall project.

    Problem Solving

    The line manager has clinical commitments which take place at the Sick Children’s Hospital. Therefore the post holder is required to work autonomously in complement to another post doctoral post within the laboratory.

    The post holder is expected to resolve most problems using accumulated experience, with only the most serious non-standard issues reported to the line manager for assistance. To use creativity and initiative to identify areas for research, develop new research methods, diversify the research parameters. Use initiative to analyse and interpret research data, and draw conclusions from it. Use initiative to help other researchers in the team to resolve project problems and develop new techniques and methods, as appropriate.

    Decision Making

    Taken independently: Organise own workload according to priority and adapt as necessary, setting of short-term time-lines, design experimental set-up to address specific research aims
    In collaboration with others: Problem solving and data interpretation, experimental design and discussion of short-term research aims and potential new research strategies
    Referred to manager: Overall timelines, changes of direction, response to serious and unexpected events, identification of the best way forward and interpretation of complex data (although input to these areas is expected).
    Level of Direction Given: Line manager will offer general orientation and advice, in addition to support in developing and implementation of research strategy, there will be an appropriate degree of independence

    Key Contacts/Relationships

    Internal:
    PI and members of the immediate research team (other researchers, technical support) and other members of the Centre for Inflammation Research, build internal contacts eg within the BRF facilities and links to share information, students

    External: Collaborating researchers worldwide, external networks to share information and develop links as appropriate

    Required Knowledge, Skills and Experience

    • Appropriate degree, with relevant post-graduate research experience. Normally a PhD or equivalent professional qualification and/or experience.
    • Ability to communicate complex information clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Expertise in relevant approaches and models, analytical techniques and methods in particular experience is required in cellular immunology, molecular biology and murine models of disease.

    Informal Enquiries

    Informal enquiries may be directed to Professor Jürgen Schwarze (e mail: Jurgen.Schwarze@ed.ac.uk)

    Salary

    The role is grade UE07 and attracts an annual salary of £27,466 to £32,796 for 35 hours each week. Salary is paid monthly by direct transfer to your Bank or Building Society account, normally on the 28th of the month. Salaries for part-time staff are calculated on the full-time scales, pro-rata to the Standard Working Week. The role is available until 31st December 2009.

    Application Procedure

    We encourage all applicants to apply online at www.jobs.ed.ac.uk. The application process is quick and easy to follow, and you will receive email confirmation of safe receipt of your application. The online system allows you to submit a CV.

    Alternatively please complete and return the Application form, including a statement addressing how your application meets the Person Specification, Additional Personal Information Form and Rehabilitation of Offenders Form to Paula Saikko, CIR, Level 2, The Queen’s Medical Research Institute, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ by the closing date of 26.11.07.

    Please complete the equal opportunities form and return in the separate prepaid envelope. We cannot guarantee to consider late applications

    Please quote reference no:

    The University reserves the right to vary the candidate information or make no appointment at all. Neither in part, nor in whole does this information form part of any contract between the University and any individual.

    For informal enquiries contact: jurgen.schwarze@ed.ac.uk.

    The post is available until 31st December 2009

    Please apply via jobs.ac.uk

    998Professorial Appointment in Immunology/Allergy MRC & Asthma

    UK Centre in Allergic Mechanismsof Asthma

    Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics KCL School of Biomedical and Health Sciences

    Applications are invited for this non-clinical professorial post.
    The appointee will be based within the Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, joining the Allergy and Asthma Research Group (BJ Sutton, HJ Gould and AJ Beavil), with
    joint membership of the Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology. The applicant will be a member of the newly established MRC & Asthma UK Centre in Allergic
    Mechanisms of Asthma (directed by Prof. Tak Lee) (www.asthma-allergy.ac.uk).
    The Randall Division (www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/biohealth/research/randall/) offers a multidisciplinary research environment that encompasses molecular and cell biology (including live cell imaging), high-resolution optical microscopy (including a 4Pi microscope), structural biology (X-ray crystallography and NMR) and bioinformatics. The MRC & Asthma UK Centre brings together research groups at both King's College London and Imperial College with a common interest in Allergy and Asthma, providing common core facilities (including protein expression and animal airway measurement) and a network of clinical collaborations across a number of London hospitals that offers access to clinical facilities and materials.

    We are seeking individuals with an internationally recognised track record of research achievement in any aspect of immunology that has relevance to the understanding of the
    molecular mechanisms of allergy and/or asthma. We will consider individuals with research interests that complement any of the research programmes of the Centre, namely: IgE structure, function and regulation; leukocyte trafficking, inflammation and airway structure; immunomodulation; infections. Applicants who have a previous competitive research programme in molecular immunology would have an advantage.

    The salary will be on the Professorial (non-clinical, Band 1) salary scale. For an informal discussion about the position, please contact:
    Professor Brian Sutton
    (Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics
    King's College London, New Hunt's House, Guy's Campus,
    London SE1 1UL) on +44 (0) 20 7 848 6423 or email brian.sutton@kcl.ac.uk

    For an application pack, please send an A4 SAE to Dipa Bhudia,
    Personnel Department, 4th Floor,
    Capital House, Weston Street,
    London SE1 3QD or email
    personnel-applications@kcl.ac.uk
    quoting reference number A5/MA/101/06

    Closing date for submission of completed application:
    7 December 2006.

    453Determinism and indeterminism, or ‘free will’ theory, appeared as contrasting philosophical traits from the time of Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics; in addition to their pure philosophical value, they probably reflect pressing inner feelings from one hand, of awe towards the unknown, and from the other, of freedom of choice. How all this relates to allergy?


    Well, there is no doubt that this same fight has been taking place within our field for some time, now. The influence of genes versus the environment has been the subject of debate for many years. The rapidly changing picture in terms of disease prevalence has been a strong argument in favor of strong environmental influence. However, there is no doubt that not everybody exposed to the same environment becomes allergic.


    Also, the presence of genetic polymorphisms has consistently been associated with increased risk for various allergy-related outcomes. This is probably a good example in favor of the need (and the “truth”) of a more complex – interaction - theory. Certainly, such approach cannot mean only a mix of contrasting factors, but denotes the meaninglessness of simplifications. Hobbes, Hume and Henry James, among many others, have attempted to reconcile the two principles.

    Possibly reflecting this view, in a recent poll, most eaaci.net viewers (37%) prefer a balanced approach. Nevertheless, the fight seems to be still going on: 29% support the notion that environment has a role only in genetically susceptible individuals; while 21% more believe that ‘it’s only the environment’. My suspicion is that a great part of these preferences is based on philosophical, rather than scientific foundations. And why not? While we strive for scientific truth, there should still be some time for contemplating the world as a whole, which may in turn inspire us for more, better and deeper research.

     

    Nikos Papadopoulos

    EAACI Website editor

    2006-2007 Board Members

    President
    Prof. Anthony J. Frew
    Secretary General
    Prof. Jan Lötvall
    Past President
    Prof. Ulrich Wahn
    1:st Vice President
    Prof. Roy Gerth van Wijk
    Vienna President
    Prof. Rudolf Valenta
    Göteborg President
    Prof. Jan Lötvall
    Barcelona President
    Prof. Ignacio J. Asotegui
    Warsaw President
    Prof. Marek L. Kowalski
    SPC Coordinator
    Prof. Cezmi Akdis
    JMA Working Group Chair
    Ulrike Raap
    Asthma Secretary
    Dr. Ioana Agache
    ENT Secretary
    Dr. Glenis Scadding
    Paediatrics Secretary
    Dr. Antonella Muraro
    Immunology Secretary
    Dr. Barbara Bohle
    Dermatology Secretary
    Prof. Torsten Zuberbier

    2003-2005 Board Members

    President
    Prof. Ulrich Wahn
    Secretary General
    Prof. Anthony J Frew
    Treasurer
    Prof. Marek L. Kowalski
    Past President
    Prof. Paul van Cauwenberge
    1:st Vice President
    Prof. Jean Bousquet
    Amsterdam President
    Prof. Roy Gerth van Wijk
    Munich President
    Prof. Johannes Ring
    Vienna President
    Prof. Rudolf Valenta
    Gothenburg President
    Prof. Jan Lötvall
    CME Co-ordinator
    Dr. Sergio Romagnani
    Asthma Secretary
    Dr. Antonio M. Vignola +
    ENT Secretary
    Dr. Joaquim Mullol
    Paediatrics Secretary
    Dr. Maria A. Muraro
    Immunology Secretary
    Dr. Thilo Jakob
    Dermatology Secretary
    Dr. Thomas Bieber

    116Stefano del Giacco
    Italy
    Policlinico Universitario di Cagliari
    Department of Medicine 2
    09042 Monserrato (Cagliari), Italy
    delgiac@tiscali.it


    Born in Cagliari, Italy, 18/12/1968

    Education
    Degree in Medicine, 1993 - University of Cagliari
    Postgraduate Degree in Internal Medicine, 1998 – University of Cagliari
    Research fellow, 1999 - University of Cagliari
    Assistant Professor of Medicine, 2002 - University of Cagliari

    I am JMA since 1998, and I'm Secretary of the EAACI Interest Group on Allergy, Asthma & Sports

    Scientific Area
    I work in the University of Cagliari Hospital and Research Centre .
    My activity deals daily with Clinical and Basic Immunology and Allergology, and my research work has been dedicated to various aspects of this interesting fields, including studies on the HIV infection. Since 1998, my research activity is dedicated mainly to Allergy and Immunology aspects related to Exercise and Sports.

    Palma de Mallorca Meeting, September 2006

    4. (i) Definitions

    a. Committees are permanent bodies instituted by the EAACI Executive Committee (ExCom) to deal with specific aspects of the Academy’s work.

     

    b. Committees are co-ordinated by a chairperson named by the ExCom and by a secretary elected by the committee’s members. They are nominated on the occasion of EAACI congresses, keep their office for two years, and are eligible for re-election to the same post.

     

    c. The chairperson of each EAACI Committee is invited to attend Executive Committee Meetings, as an adjunct member (without voting rights). Committee Secretaries may deputise for the Committee chairs if the chair is unable to attend an ExCom meeting.


    4. (ii) Scientific Programme Committee

    The Scientific Programme Committee (SPC) is a permanent body of the Academy aimed at ensuring high scientific standards, continuity and harmonisation of EAACI congresses. The committee is responsible for the programmes of EAACI congresses and meetings (see Article 1c). The SPC meets at least once every year. It is regularly consulted by local organisers of congresses for relevant decisions on the scientific programme of their congress.

     

    4. (iii) Education and Specialty Committee

    The Education and Specialty Committee (ESC) is a permanent body of EAACI aimed at co-ordinating activities in Europe in the areas of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in allergy and clinical immunology. The committee also deals with other relevant problems of our specialty, including recognition of the specialty, free circulation of specialists within Europe, relationship with other specialties, contacts with regulatory bodies, UEMS etc.

    4. (iv) CME Committee

    The CME Committee is a permanent committee of EAACI, charged with responsibility for overseeing the content and delivery of CME accreditation. The CME Committee advises on, and approves the content of educational programmes,in accordance with EU regulations and any relevant policy objectives agreed with the ExCom. The CME Committee chairman may not be a current member of the ExCom. Members of the CME Committee serve for two year terms, synchronous with the ExCom mandate, and renewable up to three times. Potential members of the CMEC are proposed by the CMEC chairman but must be ratified by the ExCom before taking up their position. All members of the CMEC are expected to declare relevant interests, and to act in the best interests of EAACI at all times.

     

    4. (v) Ethics Committee

    The Ethics Committee is a permanent body of EAACI aimed at ensuring high ethical standards in all areas of EAACI activity. These include, but are not necessarily confined to, clinical, scientific and political aspects of allergology and clinical immunology, as well as the conduct of individual members of EAACI and its various committees. All EAACI members are obliged to uphold high ethical standards. The Ethics Committee may also address behaviour or practice by non-members of EAACI where this affects the image or standing of EAACI.

     

    The Ethics Committee chairman may not be a current member of the ExCom, but attends meetings of the ExCom ex officio, as an adjunct member. Members of the Ethics Committee serve for two year terms, synchronous with the ExCom mandate, and renewable up to three times. Potential members of the Ethics Committee are proposed by the Ethics Committee chairman but must be ratified by the ExCom before taking up their position. All members of the Ethics Committee are expected to declare relevant interests and to act in the best interests of EAACI at all times.

     

    The Ethics Committee may be asked to prepare policy proposals and statements on areas of general interest within the field of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The Ethics Committee may be asked to prepare policy proposals in relation to the ethical standards and practice expected of members of the ExCom and of EAACI members. The Ethics Committee may be asked to investigate the behaviour of individual EAACI members and to report to the ExCom on whether the member in question has breached ethical standards. The ExCom will accept the verdict of the Ethics Committee, but any resultant action will be the responsibility of the ExCom.

     

    The Ethics Committee may propose changes to the By-laws that govern its function but such changes must be approved by the ExCom before they come into force. Similarly, the Ethics Committee may propose topics for the development of policy but requires the permission of the ExCom to initiate discussions and the development of policy proposals.

     

    ARTICLE 5 : SECTIONS

     

    In order to strengthen the influence of EAACI on the work of the main clinical specialities where allergy and clinical immunology is of importance, EAACI has decided to form Sections. Sections will co-ordinate and represent the activities of all EAACI members and EAACI affiliates who have expressed a wish to join the Section and will act as a focus and point of contact for relevant specialty societies and non-members.

     

    a. A Section should represent an area of clinical interest such as Dermatology, Paediatrics, etc.

    b. The purposes of the Sections are to encourage membership of EAACI from relevant areas, to relate to European and national societies of relevant areas, to promote an understanding of the importance of allergy within those societies, to advise the ExCom on matters of policy within the relevant areas, to advise the SPC on the development of relevant programmes, to promote Europe-wide co-operation in scientific and clinical research in the relevant areas, and to suggest task forces and scientific sessions within their areas.

    c. Any EAACI Member can propose that a Section be formed, but the decision to form a Section is taken by the EAACI Executive Committee.

    d. Membership of a Section is restricted to EAACI Members, Junior Members, Affiliate Members and Junior Affiliate Members.

    e. A Section is governed by a Board which has 7 members including chairman and secretary. The Chairman of a Section Board is proposed to the General Assembly by the EAACI Executive Committee, after nomination by the Section Board. The Chairman is a member of the ExCom with voting rights and is elected for a two-year period. Section Chairmen may be re-elected once to the same post. Their chairmanship should preferably be preceded by one period as a board member. The Chairman of any new Section created by the ExCom between Congresses will be an adjunct member of the ExCom until a formal election is made by the General Assembly. If the Chairman of the Section Board is unable to attend an Executive Committee meeting, the Section Board may nominate an alternate, but without voting rights.

    f. The Section Board is elected by the Section members for the same period. No more than three of the ordinary Board members can be re-elected for a second two-year period. No person may remain as a Board member for a continuous period of more than 6 years (including periods as ordinary Board member, Secretary and Chairman). Additional years, due to a decision to create a Section being taken at a Congress when the Executive Committee is not being elected, are not counted.

    g. If there is a European society with a field of interest overlapping with the Section, it may be appropriate to reserve one of the seats in the Section Board for a representative nominated by that society. If so, the Section should have a representative on the Board or Executive Committee of the society in question.

    h. A National Allergy Society can have representatives both in the EAACI Executive Committee and on the Board of one or several Sections, but consideration should be paid to maintaining a wide national representation on the Section Boards.

    i. Individual EAACI members can participate in business and scientific meetings of several Sections, but can only be members with voting rights or Board members of one Section.

    j. The Section Board nominates a Section Secretary from amongst the Board members. The Secretary’s nomination has to be confirmed by the EAACI Executive Committee. The Secretary holds office for two years and may be re-elected once to the same post, subject to the limit of six years on the Board. The Secretary of a Section is ex officio a member of the EAACI Scientific Programme Committee to represent the interests of the Section. If the Section Secretary is unable to attend a Scientific Programme Committee meeting, the Section Board may nominate an alternate.

    k. The Section Board members are expected to keep in communication by telephone/email and are expected to hold one Board Meeting in between the annual EAACI congresses. However, the Annual General Meeting of the Section Board should be held during the EAACI Congress.

    l. Each Section is expected to arrange a business meeting for its members during each EAACI Congress. A suitable room will be offered free of charge.

    m. A Section can ask the Executive Committee to approve the establishment of a Task Force to work on a specific project for a given time.

    n. The scientific activities of a Section should be channelled through the EAACI Scientific Programme Committee. Each Section is encouraged to propose a programme and compete for one or more Main Symposia at each EAACI Congress to be presented in the name of the Section. The content must be co-ordinated with the work of the EAACI Congress Local Organising Committee and the EAACI Scientific Programme Committee which has the power to reject or modify the proposal.

    o. The EAACI Executive Committee should rely on the expertise of the Section in matters of interest to the Section.

    p. The Section should rely on the EAACI Executive Office for all matters of general interest to EAACI.

    q. A small budget should be granted to a Section for administrative expenses including mailing costs, telephone conferences and a Board meeting between EAACI annual congresses. Budgets and itemised accounts should be submitted to and approved by the EAACI Treasurer.

    r. Section Meetings: Sections are encouraged to hold Section Meetings, either alone or in collaboration with each other, or with sister societies, on topics relevant to the Section. It is envisaged that such meetings will be held at a time and place which does not clash with other EAACI events. EAACI will grant a fixed annual sum to the Sections to assist them in developing these meetings and providing travel grants. Proposals for such meetings should be developed by the Section and presented to the Executive Committee for approval. The total budget for these Section Meetings is currently 125,000 Euro/year (i.e. 25,000 Euro per section per year). Each Section may carry forward any unused part of its allocation from one year to the next, within a five year cycle (the current cycle being the calendar years 2004-2008).
    941 942

    For the last six years the Immunology Section of the EAACI has been organizing a meeting for young doctoral and postdoctoral scientists, who are active in allergy and clinical immunology research with the goal to increase the impact of basic immunology research on the fields of allergy and clinical immunology. The list of keynote speakers who have participated in the past include outstanding scientist such as: Ulrich von Andrian, Kim Bottomly, Richard Flavell, Raif Geha, Erwin Gelfand, Ron Germain, David Gray, Patrik Holt, Juha Kere, Jean-Pierre Kinet, Peter Krammer, Antonio Lanzavecchia, Markus Manz, Philippa Marrack, Fritz Melchers, Lorenzo Moretta, Antonius Rolink, Robert Seder, Dale Umetsu, Hermann Wagner. The first four of these meetings, three of which took place in Davos, have been a great success and coined the name EAACI-Davos meeting.

     

    The 5th EAACI-GA2LEN Davos Meeting Basic Immunology Research in Allergy and Asthma took place again in Davos between the 1st and the 4th of February, 2007. The meeting was organized by the Immunology Section, this time together with the Asthma Section of the EAACI, and the Swiss Institute for Allergy and Asthma Research, with generous support from GA2LEN.

     

    The programme of the meeting included 5 main symposia on innate immunity, adaptive immunity and regulation in allergic inflammation. Each symposium opened by a keynote lecture followed by presentations of participants as selected from their abstracts.

     

    The keynote speakers include:

    • Fred Finkelman, Cincinnati, OH
    • Steven Galli, Stanford, CA
    • Barry Kay, London, UK
    • Kenneth Murphy, St. Louis, MO
    • Marsha Wills-Karp, Cincinnati, OH
    • Federica Sallusto, Bellinzona, CH.

     

    As in previous years,the meeting was opened to 70 participants, who were selected based on the scientific quality of the submitted abstract. In total, 25 abstracts were presented as oral presentations.

     

     

     

    Thilo Jakob
    Chairman of the EAACI Immunology Section

    The Paul-Ehrlich-Institut intends to install two new independent Junior Research Groups. These groups will establish new competitive interdisciplinary research areas which will complement and strengthen existing research activities as delineated in the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut Research Programme (www.pei.de).

     

     

    The Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, located close to Frankfurt/Main, Germany, is a federal agency responsible for conventional and innovative biomedicinal drugs. Its major research activities are focused on immunology, allergology, virology, gene therapy, and prion biology.

     

     

    Applications are invited for

     

    Position 1:

    Head of the Junior Research Group “Experimental Allergology”

     

    Position 2:

    Head of the Junior Research Group “New Vaccination Strategies and Early Immune Responses”

     

    The successful candidates should hold a Ph.D. or M.D. degree and have strong research expertise in allergology (including allergy models), or immunology with a specific focus on animal models, cellular and molecular immunology, vaccine development and/or vector development.

     

    Please, address informal enquiries and specific questions to:

     

    Prof. Stefan Vieths or Dr. Ulrich Kalinke (groupleaderposition@pei.de).

     

    Send applications for both positions, including a detailed CV, and a comprehensive research proposal to:

     

    “Personalreferat des Paul-Ehrlich-Instituts”

    51-59, Paul-Ehrlich-Str.,

    63225 Langen

    Germany

    Email: nal@pei.de

     

    Deadline for application: now closed

    Since several years EAACI together with GA2LEN supports summer schools all over Europe. The summer school in Rotterdam was organised by the EAACI Asthma section and had as main theme "Asthma and Allergy: bridging the gap between basic and clinical science".

    On Saturday 27th August, 104 participants from all over Europe and even more far away (Iran, Russia, Georgia and United States) arrived in Rotterdam Golden Tulip hotel. The venue was nicely located on the bank of the Maas river in downtown Rotterdam. In restaurant Prachtig next to the Erasmus bridge all people were welcomed with an outdoor reception and Urban Barbecue. Fortunately the weather was extremely good for Dutch standards and contributed to the perfect atmosphere.

    The kick-off of the scientific programme took place on Sunday 28th August 9.00 AM. Although quite a few people went bar hopping the night before, the meeting room was full. After a short introduction and welcome of Gert-Jan Braunstahl, Gerard Koppelman from Groningen started with the first session about Asthma, nature or nurture. In this session the pathogenesis of asthma was discussed with special emphasis on genetics, psychological factors, environment, exercise and infections. In the afternoon, the immunopathology of asthma was the topic of interest. In clear presentations the speakers took their audience by the hand and unraveled the secrets of innate immunity, T-cells, neuro-immune interactions, mast cells, eosinophils and chemokines.

    After the end of the session, the whole group took off to the nearby beach where we had a volleyball tournament and BBQ. On the sounds of several Golden Oldies there was room for dancing and getting to know each other better.
    On Monday Peter Sterk from Leiden opened the session assessment and monitoring of asthma with a presentation about bronchial hyperreactivity. His talk was followed by several other presentations discussing the role of sputum induction, NO-measurement and airway remodeling.

    After lunch break the whole group left for a boat ride to Kinderdijk, which is famous for its beautiful windmills. The boat ride was great and everyone seemed to enjoy the sun and wonderful skyline of Rotterdam. In Kinderdijk there was ample opportunity to look inside one of the windmills and to have an impression of earlier times. In the evening we went by underground to historic Delfshaven, where a dinner buffet was organized in a 400 year old beer brewery.

    Despite the fact that the local beer was very much appreciated by most of the people, almost everybody was present on Tuesday morning s session about Evidence Based Medicine in airway disease. During this session several international Guidelines were presented, such as GINA, ARIA, GOLD and GARD. At lunch break interactive sessions were organized in small groups in which people were able to present their own work. There was a variety of research presented from basic science to clinical investigations. The discussion was lively and the presenters got good feedback on their projects. Subsequently, the whole group was split in four smaller groups visiting different parts of the Rotterdam University Hospital. There workshops were organized about various topics, such as animal models, immunopathology, diagnostic approaches and asthma and allergy in the clinic. During the workshops there was opportunity to watch several procedures and do experiments. At 19.00 hr the whole group gathered at the docks to take off by water taxi to the Euromast. With the incredible speed of 40 km/hr the group was transferred to the dinner place which was situated at 80 m high. The view from the restaurant overlooking Rotterdam and the docklands was marvelous. It was quite obvious that after 4 days of summer school the participants were much closer now. After dinner we had a last night cap at the borders of the Maas.

    On Wednesday August 31st a symposium was organized together with the Dutch Asthma Foundation covering asthma therapy and failure. Current therapeutic approaches and new asthma therapies were discussed in lively presentations. The delegates actively participated in the discussions. After lunch break several Dutch pediatricians talked about early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of asthma and allergy in children. At the end of the course there was a small reception. Most of the participants had already left by that time.

    From the feedback we have had until now, we may conclude that it was a very successful event. The organization would like to thank the enthusiastic faculty, who actively participated in the scientific as well as in the social programme. Finally, we are very grateful for the financial support from GA2LEN and EAACI, which made it possible for many participants to attend the summer school.

    Gert-Jan Braunstahl

    206.RES.AREAFrom the EUROPA website:

    Europe has a long standing tradition of excellence in research and innovation, and European teams continue to lead progress in many fields of science and technology. However our centres of excellence are scattered across the continent and all too often their efforts fail to add up in the absence of adequate networking and cooperation. In the past, collaborative actions have been initiated at European and Community level, but now is the time to bring our endeavours together and to build a research and innovation equivalent of the "common market" for goods and services. That structure is called the European Research Area and is regrouping all Community supports for the better coordination of research activities and the convergence of research and innovation policies, at national and EU levels.

    All important developments related to the ERA are followed in the EUROPA website, which is under the CORDIS server at <http://www.cordis.lu/era/> .

    314Theme: Dendritic and regulatory T cells in allergic diseases and/or lung chronic rejection
    Department: Research Department of Respiratory Diseases, Service of Pneumo-allergology, Hospital St Marguerite, Marseille

    The Research Department of Respiratory Diseases, Service of Pneumo-allergology in St Margeurite Hospital in Marseille is now accepting open applications for a post-doctoral researcher in the field of Dendritic and regulatory T cells in allergic diseases and/or lung chronic rejection, upon the applicant's desires and background. Appointments will be for two years, with possible extension for another year.


    The project applies to Ph.D. and/or M.D. students. A background in molecular or cell biology is preferable. The deadline for applications is September 2004. Applicants should send a cover letter, C.V., summary of past work, and names and addresses of three referees to:

     

    Professeur Antoine Magnan

    Service de Pneumo-allergologie

    Hôpital Ste Marguerite

    270 Bd de Ste Marguerite,

    BP 29 F-13274 Marseille Cedex 09
    e-mail : antoine.magnan@ap-hm.fr

    Sections and Interest Groups (IGs) are at the heart of all EAACI activities and therefore of utmost importance for our organisation. If you are a Section or IG member, you have the unique opportunity to influence
    the future of the Academy by participating in the 2013 elections. Vote for your Section and/or Interest Group Board Members and make a difference!
    Do not miss the chance to follow the EAACI Congress 2012 political symposium with the title: “EU Health Priorities: Political and Research Agenda” (Monday 10:45 - 12:15) live by clicking here.
    PhARF (Phadia Allergy Research Forum) was established in 1987 to honor the 20th anniversary of the discovery of IgE at Uppsala University.  PhARF is sponsored by Phadia, the world-leading company in the field of in vitro allergy diagnostics. The winner will be revealed at the Award Ceremony on Sunday 17 June during the EAACI Congress in Geneva Palexpo, Hall 2.

    Read more
    There are only a few days left to submit your abstract for the next EAACI Winter School to be held in Are, Sweden, 12-15 February 2012. Follow the link below and grab the opportunity to submit your abstract no later than 15 November 2011!

    Click here
    BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES IN ALLERGOLOGY

    June 2011

    Claude MOLINA* & Jacques GAYRAUD**

    1. Allergy to psocids : parasites of ecological buildings
    2. Allergens, television and children airway inflammation
    3. Anaphylaxis during anaesthesia in France
    4. Vitamin D deficiency in the USA and risks of allergy
    5. Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), a diagnosis and therapy trap


    1.  Allergy to psocids : parasites of ecological buildings

    Theme : Asthma
    Key words : psocids, booklice, ecological materials

    Psocids are small insects known and described as indoor allergens in India and more recently observed in Western countries, particularly in houses built with ecological materials for insulation and heating. The Reims (France) Pulmonary Allergy team led by F.Lavaud describes a rare case of allergic asthma (J.M Perotin et al: Allergy  early view 22 April 2011) occurring in a 33 year-old woman presenting rhinitis and conjunctivitis for 2 months, recently associated with wheezing cough and – after pulmonary function testing – reversible airway obstruction. She lived in a flat recently insulated with some ecological material (hemp). Antihistamine and inhaled corticosteroid dramatically decreased the symptoms.
    The allergy investigation showed skin prick tests and IgEs negative to common airborne allergens, but the patient mentioned little insects in her room, identified as psocids (Liposcelis) by an entomologist. Extracts prepared from these parasites provoked positive skin tests and specific IgEs (negative in control patients, just as they were to tropomyosin from Dermatophagoides farinae and cockroaches which could be co-sensitisation responsible with psocids).
    These insects are usually found in tree bark or leaves, as well as damp houses, cellars or food hangars (they are called “booklice”). They can also be observed in emerging countries as straw, hemp and hessian parasites, but also as occupational allergens in entomologic or stuffed animal collections.
    Few reported observations can be found. This is the first documented case of non-occupational allergic asthma due to this insect behaving like an indoor allergen, whose proliferation is boosted by the use of ecological materials: here, hemp, whose eviction induced a favourable outcome without relapse in 6 years.

    Thus, beside dust mites, cockroaches, bees, wasps and other insects, with psocids the Allergist enlarges his expertise and competence in entomology.


    2.  Allergens, television and children airway inflammation
    Theme : Asthma
    Key words : exhaled NO (FENO), house dust mites, sedentary behaviour, daily hours of TV /video games, physical activity

    We know that the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a marker for airway inflammation and is clinically used to monitor asthma evolution. The Harvard (Boston, USA) medical group has attempted to define the contribution of allergen exposure in children to FENO levels (J.E Sordillo et al JACI May 2011 vol 127  5  1165